Visual Arts

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Rationale

This rationale complements and extends the rationale for The Arts learning area.
Visual arts includes the fields of art, craft and design. Learning in and through these fields, students create visual representations that communicate, challenge and express their own and others’ ideas as artist and audience.

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Aims

In addition to the overarching aims of the Australian Curriculum: The Arts, visual arts knowledge, understanding and skills ensure that, individually and collaboratively, students develop:

conceptual and perceptual ideas and representations through design and inquiry processes

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Structure

Learning in Visual Arts
Learning in Visual Arts involves students making and responding to artworks, drawing on the world as a source of ideas. Students engage with the knowledge of visual arts, develop skills, techniques and processes, and use materials as they explore a range of forms, styles and contexts.

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Example of knowledge and skills

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Years 5 and 6

Years 5 and 6 Band Description

In Years 5 and 6, students draw on artworks from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the arts of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and of the Asia region and learn that they are used for different purposes. While the arts in the local community should be the initial focus for learning, students are also aware of and interested in the arts from more distant locations and the curriculum provides opportunities to build on this curiosity. 

As they make and respond to the arts, students explore meaning and interpretation, and social and cultural contexts of the arts. They evaluate the use of forms and elements in artworks they make and observe.

Students extend their understanding of safety in the arts. In Years 5 and 6, their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds on previous bands. They develop their understanding and use of performance or technical skills to communicate intention for different audiences. They identify a variety of audiences for different arts experiences as they engage with more diverse artworks as artists and audiences.

In Visual Arts, students:

  • develop understanding of use and application of visual conventions as they develop conceptual and representational skills
  • test and innovate with properties and qualities of available materials, techniques, technologies and processes, combining two or more visual arts forms to test the boundaries of representation.
  • explore a diversity of ideas, concepts and viewpoints as they make and respond to visual artworks as artists and audiences
  • draw ideas from other artists, artworks, symbol systems, and visual arts practices in other cultures, societies and times
  • extend their understanding of how and why artists, craftspeople and designers realise their ideas through different visual representations, practices, processes and viewpoints. 

Years 5 and 6 Content Descriptions

Explore ideas and practices used by artists, including practices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists, to represent different views, beliefs and opinions (ACAVAM114 - Scootle )
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
  • selecting and manipulating combinations of materials and techniques
  • exploring cross-media effects and characteristics of representation when making artworks inspired by observation or imagination, for example, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art from the local community, graffiti art, graphic design, or manga art
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • Considering viewpoints – materials and technologies: What is the artwork made of? How does the choice of material enhance the audience’s understanding of the artist’s intention? What made you want to touch this sculpture?
  • trialling different ways to represent views, beliefs or opinions in their artworks in response to exploration of how artists communicate their views, beliefs and opinions through art
  • making aesthetic choices about representation and being able to explain their choices describing the visual conventions and processes
Develop and apply techniques and processes when making their artworks (ACAVAM115 - Scootle )
  • enhancing and practising their art making skills in using a range of materials and technologies
  • Considering viewpoints – materials and technologies: What is the artwork made of? How does the choice of material enhance the audience’s understanding of the artist’s intention? What made you want to touch this sculpture?
  • making informed choices about using various combinations of representational elements appropriate for a concept, theme or subject matter, for example, combining realistic drawing skills with an appropriated image from the past to create new meaning
  • explaining influences of other artists on their own art making
  • evaluating the characteristics of their work that are more successful, and work to improve their knowledge and skills from this reflection
Plan the display of artworks to enhance their meaning for an audience (ACAVAM116 - Scootle )
  • identifying reasons for the range of audience interpretations of the same artwork, for example, Considering viewpoints or the conceptual approach of the artwork
  • Considering viewpoints – histories: For example – What did the artist want the audience to see and understand?
  • recognising and evaluating how culture, gender, age, time and place, among other factors, impact on how an audience reads an artwork, for example, comparing the response of different age groups
  • Considering viewpoints – societies and cultures: For example – What clues in the artwork tell us where it was made, who made it, and why? What artworks are you familiar with? Which style of artwork represents your community? How would you represent your neighbourhood?
  • reflecting critically on how effectively their ideas or feelings have been expressed in their own artworks, and that of others
  • Considering viewpoints – skills, techniques and processes: For example – How did the artist work within a space, and at this time? How have they innovated their practice?
  • presenting their artworks using internet-based technologies, including social media
Explain how visual arts conventions communicate meaning by comparing artworks from different social, cultural and historical contexts, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artworks (ACAVAR117 - Scootle )
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
  • making discerning judgments about how they work as an artist, and what and why they design and create, using appropriate visual conventions, for example, a sculpture that expresses movement
  • Considering viewpoints – critical theories: For example – Compare these paintings (one from India, one Australian). What do you recognise? What do you understand? What is new?
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • explaining the artistic vision of artists from different contexts, particularly referencing the meaning their artworks convey, for example, Aboriginal rock art, graffiti art, Egyptian art
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
  • Considering viewpoints – meanings and interpretations: For example – What is this artwork about? What visual conventions have been used to convey meaning? How did the artist represent their subject matter? How does the artwork reflect the artist’s perspective about the environment? How did the audience react to the artwork when it was first displayed?
  • analysing how symbolic meaning or metaphor is constructed in their own artworks and artworks of others
  • Considering viewpoints – psychology: For example – What elements are used to show excitement in the sculpture? Make a scary monster.
  • expressing an opinion about the way numerous artists communicate multiple viewpoints through their artwork
  • Considering viewpoints – evaluations: For example – Did it make you think more seriously about the issue? Did the rest of the class understand your message?

Years 5 and 6 Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 6, students explain how ideas are communicated in artworks they make and to which they respond. They describe characteristics of artworks from different social, historical and cultural contexts that influence their art making.

Students structure elements and processes of arts subjects to make artworks that communicate meaning. They work collaboratively to share artworks for audiences, demonstrating skills and techniques.

By the end of Year 6, students explain how ideas are represented in artworks they make and view. They describe the influences of artworks and practices from different cultures, times and places on their art making.

Students use visual conventions and visual arts practices to express a personal view in their artworks. They demonstrate different techniques and processes in planning and making artworks. They describe how the display of artworks enhances meaning for an audience.


Years 5 and 6 Work Sample Portfolios