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Context statement

The place of the Korean culture and language in Australia and the world
Korean is the language of one of Australia’s important neighbours in the Asian region and is spoken by around 80 million people in the Korean Peninsula and worldwide.

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PDF documents

Resources and support materials for the Australian Curriculum: Languages - Korean are available as PDF documents. 
Languages - Korean: Sequence of content
Languages - Korean: Sequence of Achievement - F-10 Sequence
Languages - Korean: Sequence …

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Foundation to Year 2

Foundation to Year 2 Band Description

The nature of the learners

Children enter the early years of schooling with established oracy skills in one or more languages and varying degrees of early literacy capability. For young students, learning typically focuses on their immediate world of family, home, school, friends and neighbourhood. They are learning how to socialise with new people, share with others, and participate in structured routines and activities at school. Typically, they have little to no experience of Korean language and culture.

Korean language learning and use

Korean language learning at this stage is focused on developing learners’ oral language and familiarising learners with the language through interaction involving enjoyment, imagination and action. Through classroom routines and action-related activities such as playing games, dancing, singing and chanting, students learn and use Korean to socialise with others and explore the primary world around them. Non-verbal expressions such as miming, movement and gestures are an important part of students’ learning. Children begin to hear single words, phrases and short simple texts in Korean, relating them to concrete objects and people seen and known in their immediate environment, to what they feel and do, and to topics about self, home, family, and classroom activities. They listen to, use and experiment with simple formulaic language for routines such as greetings, introductions and classroom language, and become familiar with meaningful sounds in Korean. With the introduction of Hangeul, children become further aware of the relationships between sounds and letters, and between syllables and syllable blocks in Korean speech and script. As their phonological awareness increases, they begin to develop literacy in Korean, identifying simple Korean words in short texts through activities such as shared/supported reading or sight word games. They start to write Hangeul by copying or tracing words, and later co-construct longer texts such as chants and rhymes. Through the repeated use of simple patterns where basic key particles, verb endings and honorific elements are used, children notice that some Korean grammatical elements and rules are different from those of English. As students use simple language patterns with culturally appropriate gestures or body language, they recognise elements of Korean culture such as politeness embedded in the Korean language and its use, and become aware that there are different ways to communicate using languages other than their own.

Contexts of interaction

The primary context for students’ interaction is the language classroom, with the teacher of Korean language and peers. Students may have some access to Korean-speaking peers in wider school or community settings. Their use of Korean primarily relates to classroom routines and activities, drawing on their interest in play, movement and games and on their curiosity about the world around them.

Texts and resources

Learners have exposure to a variety of spoken, visual and written/digital texts. They listen and respond to teacher talk, and take part in songs, play, stories and simple conversations. Written and digital texts include picture books, wall charts, Big Books and teacher-generated materials such as games, labels, captions and flashcards. Writing development is supported through tracing and copying simple words as sight words and short modelled sentences in texts such as greeting cards or captions, and through co-creating shared resources such as word walls or storyboards.

Features of Korean language use

Students become familiar with the sound system of the Korean language, recognising Korean pronunciation as being different from that of their own language/s. They learn to pronounce syllable blocks as part of sight words, recognising the association between simple vowel and consonant sounds with their corresponding letters. They recognise, use and distinguish simple Korean intonation patterns for statements and questions. They become familiar with and use the pattern of simple basic sentences such as those with –요 at the end, and notice similarities and differences between Korean and English. They begin to develop curiosity about Korea and Korean people and about different ways of making meaning using Korean.

Level of support

Children need rich language input and their learning is supported with the ample provision of scaffolding and language modelling. They need opportunities to build and test hypotheses about the Korean language and culture, to review, recycle and revise them, and to adjust their use of the Korean language and understanding of Korean culture. Attention to diversity in students’ learning needs and backgrounds, and to the provision of continuous encouragement, cues, feedback and opportunities for learners to reflect, support these hypothesis building and testing processes. As the main source of target language input, the teacher provides ample models and examples of the Korean language and culture with the support of visual cues and resources such as pictures, realia, objects and charts.

The role of English

While the teacher and learners are encouraged to use Korean wherever possible, English is used for discussion, reflection, questions and explanations relating to complex ideas or aspects of languages or cultures, and in tasks which involve moving between the two languages, such as bilingually naming objects or images.


Foundation to Year 2 Content Descriptions

Socialising

Interact and socialise with peers and teacher to greet, introduce themselves and give basic personal information

[Key concepts: self, family; Key processes: greeting, playing, imitating] (ACLKOC115 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • greeting the teacher and peers using appropriate expressions and body language, for example, 안녕하세요? 안녕? 만나서 반가워요

  • introducing themselves using 저는…이에요/예요 as a set phrase

  • asking about and expressing likes/dislikes usingsimple language such as 뭐 좋아해요? 고양이를 좋아해요

Engage in guided group activities and simple exchanges such as playing games; group singing or dancing; contributing ideas through key words, images, mimes

[Key concepts: play, group; Key processes: singing, chanting, observing, drawing] (ACLKOC116 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • participating in group singing and chanting and performing actions, for example, 가나다 노래, 안녕 노래

  • making simple requests using … 주세요 and expressing thanks, 고맙습니다

  • providing descriptions of familiar objects or people, for example, 마이클이에요, 코예요

  • following instructions for language games such as pass the message, 코코코 놀이

Interact in familiar classroom routines and follow simple classroom instructions

[Key concepts: routines, interactions; Key processes: observing, responding] (ACLKOC117 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • using ... 있어요/없어요 and 네/아니요 to interact with the teacher inroutine exchanges such as roll call

  • responding with appropriate actions to the teacher’s simple instructions such as 따라하세요, 일어나세요, 앉으세요,인사하세요

  • asking questions and responding to the teacher and peers by using 뭐예요? …이에요/예요

  • using 안녕하세요?; 안녕히 가세요/계세요, to greet or to take leave

Informing

Locate specific words and expressions in simple texts such as signs, titles and captions, and use information tocomplete guided oral and written tasks

[Key concepts: text, meaning; Key processes: locating, noticing,matching] (ACLKOC118 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • using a variety of skills such as labelling,matching, clicking and dragging, drawing, miming and actions to locate and use information

  • locating and using information to describe, name, draw and trace, for example, 머리, 손. 발

  • classifying and categorising information gained from others, such as about favourite foods, for example, 미셸은 피자를 좋아해요

  • using contextual and visual cues while reading with the teacher, for example, using illustrations and printed/audio narrations when reading Big Books or digital books

Share simple information about themselves, known people, everyday objects and places of interest

[Key concepts: self, preference; Key processes: describing, showing] (ACLKOC119 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • reporting on information gathered from friends using simple structures such as ... 좋아해요 and ...있어요

  • contributing to a class photo story, for example, creating and reading aloud captions to own photos (저는 ...이에요/예요) and aspects of personal information (저는 바나나를 좋아해요; 저는 토끼가 없어요)

  • using simple sentence structures, familiar vocabulary, concrete materials and supporting gestures to communicate about self and the immediate environment, for example, 뭐예요? 양이에요. 저는 씨월드를 좋아해요

Creating

Participate in chants, choral and shared reading of short imaginative texts in audio-visual, print and digital media such as cartoons, stories or rhymes, and responding through play-acting, illustrating, miming or making short statements

[Key concepts: character, story; Key processes: playing, choral reading] (ACLKOC120 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • participating in shared reading, sharing opinions and responding to questions about imaginative texts

  • responding to imaginative texts including digital texts, stories, rhymes and songs through play-acting, illustrating, facial expression or movement

  • interacting with a character or puppet in an imaginary situation or setting, for example, 안녕하세요?; 저는 미나예요; 만나서 반가워요

  • making simple evaluative statements about favourite characters in stories, rhymes or songs, for example, … 좋아해요/싫어해요

  • re-creating stories, rhymes and songs through mime, dance or drawing with simple captions

Create captions to images for individual presentation and participate in shared performances and imaginative activities using familiar words, phrases and language patterns

[Key concepts: performance; Key processes: drawing, singing, dancing] (ACLKOC121 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • creating own version of a story by sequencing a series of pictures with captions or by creating a storyboard with labels using modelled language, for example, 안녕하세요?; … 있어요? 네, 있어요 / 아니요, 없어요; 고맙습니다

  • performing songs, rhymes and action stories using non-verbal forms of expression such as clapping, gestures and facial expressions to support the making of meaning

  • creating and presenting own Big Books, storyboards or digital texts based on imaginary scenarios infamiliar contexts, for example, 곰 세 마리

Translating

Translate familiar words and phrases, using visual cues and word lists, explaining the meaning of particular words, gestures and expressions

[Key concepts: similarity, difference; Key processes: noticing] (ACLKOC122 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • noticing words in Korean and English that have the same meaning, such as 테니스,컴퓨터, 코알라 and considering why

  • recognising that every language has its own words, sounds and gestures to make meaning

  • using Korean and/or English to name familiar objects and conduct simple conversations, translating when necessary to help others understand

  • sharing and interpreting simple expressions and songs with friends and family, for example, showing them how to sing 학교 종, 생일 노래

Create labels, captions or short statements in Korean and English for the immediate learning environment and for familiar objects or images

[Key concepts: counterpart; Key processes: naming, labelling, matching] (ACLKOC123 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • creating a bilingual picture dictionary for their classroom use

  • matching Korean and English texts, for example, name tags of friends in Korean and English

  • creating bilingual captions in Korean and English for a photographic display using digital technologies to show parents or others about a class event or experience such as sports day, school camp or pets day

Reflecting

Notice aspects of Korean language andculture that are ‘new’, sharing how interacting in Korean can be different to interacting in own language/s

[Keyconcepts: respect, acceptance; Key processes: noticing, comparing] (ACLKOC124 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • noticing that there are different ways to greet people in Korean, recognising their similarities and differences to those in their own language and culture

  • familiarising themselves with simple spoken exchanges in Korean, including how to use appropriate gestures, for example, how to bow and make hand gestures when saying 안녕하세요?

  • describing how it feels to use Korean, for example, when singing a song or hearing Korean spoken by others

  • including some Korean words and expressions in English conversation when it feels appropriate (for example, 네, 선생님, 고맙습니다), noticing changes in behaviour or body language when speaking Korean

Recognise themselves as members of different groups, including the Korean class, the school, their family and community, and consider their roles within these different groups

[Key concepts: self, role; Key processes: noticing] (ACLKOC125 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • naming languages they know and are learning, for example, 한국어

  • making simple statements about themselves, including who they are and their personal preferences, for example, 저는 …이에요/예요, 저는 … 좋아해요/싫어해요

  • noticing their own use of words, expressions or behaviours that make them who they are, such as using words from different languages, ways of celebrating or communicating that may not be familiar to other people

Systems of language

Recognise the sounds of the Korean language and the forms of Hangeul syllable blocks, and understand that the syllable block is the basic unit of writing in Korean, associating individual syllable blocks with their pronunciations

[Key concepts: phonic awareness, meaningfulness, unit of writing; Key processes: recognising, discriminating, mimicking] (ACLKOU126 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • differentiating Korean and English sounds, for example, by comparing names in Korean and English (for example, 로버트versus ‘Robert’)

  • categorising names according to their first consonant, for example, 마크, 매튜, 마이클

  • discriminating between simple vowel and consonant letters in a syllable block

  • recognising the order of strokes in writing syllable blocks

Recognise some basic features of the Korean grammatical system, such as the verb- final rule, the sentence-final –요,and notice chunks in which a noun or pronoun is combined with a case marker as part of a sentence

[Key concepts: word order, politeness; Key processes: noticing, selecting] (ACLKOU127 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • recognising –요 at the end of a sentence through its repetitive use in sentences such as 따라하세요 and 안녕하세요?

  • noticing that the Korean copula alternates between two forms (–이에요 and –예요) and using it with own names, for example, 마이클이에요/매튜예요

  • understanding that 저 is used to refer to the self

  • identifying a structure where a noun or a pronoun is followed by a basic case marker such as –은/는, –이/가 and –을/를 (for example, 저는) as a chunk which has a syntactic function in a sentence

  • understanding how to make a simple question using a basic question word, for example, 뭐 좋아해요?

Notice and use simple vocabulary to identify familiar objects and to describe simple actions, statesor qualities in familiar contexts

[Key concepts: word, meaning, name; Key processes: noticing, selecting] (ACLKOU128 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • identifying and using basic words for familiar objects, for example, body parts, pets and days of the week

  • responding to a simple question using 네/아니요 to express agreement/disagreement

  • using basic verbs with the –어/아요 ending in familiar contexts, for example, 있어요, 없어요, 좋아해요

Notice and identify different types of simple spoken, written and digital texts used for different purposes in familiar contexts

[Key concepts: text; Key processes: recognising, identifying] (ACLKOU129 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • listening to and viewing different types of simple texts in Korean including digital or online texts and recognising that Korean is used for purposes such as songs, chants, dialogues and stories

  • identifying Korean words in spoken and written texts where Korean is used alongside words from other languages

Language variation and change

Recognise that there are different words and expressions used by Korean speakers to address and greet people in different contexts and situations

[Key concepts: appropriateness, respect; Key processes: noticing, comparing] (ACLKOU130 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • noticing differences in greetings and expressions used in different social settings where people of different ages and/or different degrees of familiarity are involved

  • identifying social relationships between people interacting in videoclips, cartoons, photographs or role play

Recognise that languages change continuously and borrow words from each other

[Key concepts: word-borrowing; Key processes: noticing, selecting] (ACLKOU131 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • recognising loan words originating from other languages, for example, 코알라, 캥거루, 펭귄, 초코렛, 아이스크림

  • identifying Korean words used in English contexts, for example, taekwondo, kimchi

Recognise that Korean is one of many languages spoken in multicultural Australia and in the world

[Key concepts: multilingualism, community; Key processes: noticing, naming] (ACLKOU132 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • understanding that the world contains many different languages spoken by many different communities of speakers and that most people in the world speak more than one language

  • naming languages they have encountered in their everyday life, such as the languages of their neighbours or classmates

  • exploring the range of languages spoken in Australia, including Aboriginal languages and Torres Strait Islander languages, Asian languages and world languages

    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia

Role of language and culture

Understand that ways people use language reflect their culture, such as where and how they live and what is important to them, finding examples of similarities and differences between Korean and Australian ways of communicating

[Key concepts: language, culture, meaning; Key processes: noticing, making connections] (ACLKOU133 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • comparing gestures and body language associated with language use in different cultures, for example, bowing and saying 안녕하세요? when greeting in Korean, different ways of kissing on the cheek saying ‘hi’ in English-speaking cultures including Australia and pressing noses (that is, hongi)and saying ‘kia-ora’ when greeting in Maori

  • exploring the meaning of ‘culture’ and how it involves visible elements, for example, ways of eating or symbols such as flags, and invisible elements, for example, how people live, what they value, and how they think about themselves and others


Foundation to Year 2 Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 2, students interact with peers and teachers through play- and action-related talk, exchanging greetings and introducing themselves (for example, 안녕하세요?; 안녕?; 저는 ...이에요/예요 used as a set phrase) with gestures. They respond to question cues (such as 뭐예요?) by naming objects with single words (for example, 눈! 코! 입! 고양이!) or using short, simple sentences as set phrases (for example, 눈이에요, 고양이예요). They respond to teacher instructions such as 따라 하세요, 일어나세요 by imitating the teacher’s actions or speech, and to the teacher’s simple closed-ended questions by giving short answers such as 있어요/없어요 or 네/아니요. They make simple requests using … 주세요 and thank each other or the teacher using 고맙습니다 with appropriate gestures. They mimic and approximate Korean pronunciation of simple words, and locate and read specific words such as names of people or objects provided in familiar types of short texts. Students present simple information relating to themselves, their friends or everyday objects, using simple words and set phrases. They create and perform their own simple texts using modelled examples and formulaic language. Students use vocabulary related to their class and home environments. They use the personal pronoun , basic particles –은/는, –이/가 and –을/를 as part of formulaic chunks ending with –어/아요 or –이에요/예요 (for example, 저는 고양이가 없어요). They match simple Korean and English texts written in Hangeul and English such as 로버트 and Robert, and identify familiar objects in both languages. Students explain aspects of Korean language and culture in everyday language use, such as ways of greeting and thanking, identify differences or similarities to their own language/s and culture/s, and discuss the experience of learning and using the Korean language.

Students discriminate Korean sounds and script from those of English and other languages. They identify the syllable block as the unit of writing and associate individual syllable blocks with their pronunciations. They identify their own names written in Korean using syllable blocks (for example, 로버트, 마크) and pronounce them using Korean sounds. Students identify –요 at the end of a sentence as indicating some polite meaning. They identify as referring to self and 저는 as an equivalent to ‘I’ in a sentence. They choose between –이에요 and –예요 when they construct a sentence using a copula (for example, 재키예요; 마이클이에요). They identify Korean language as the language of Korea and as one of the many languages used in Australia and in the world. Students identify some loan words from other languages and Korean words used in Australia and other countries. Students identify differences and similarities between their own and others’ languages and cultures.


Foundation to Year 2 Work Sample Portfolios