Japanese

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Context statement

The place of Japanese culture and language in Australia and in the world
Japanese is the official language of Japan, Australia’s northern neighbour in the Asia region. It is also widely used by communities of speakers in Hawaii, Peru and Brazil, and learnt as an additional language by large numbers of students in the Republic of Korea, China, Indonesia and Australia.

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PDF documents

Resources and support materials for the Australian Curriculum: Languages - Japanese are available as PDF documents. 
Languages - Japanese: Sequence of content
Languages - Japanese: Sequence of Achievement - F-10 Sequence
Languages - Japanese: Sequence …

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Years 5 and 6

Years 5 and 6 Band Description

The nature of the learners

At this level, students are widening their social networks, experiences and communication repertoires in both their first language and Japanese. They continue to need guidance and participate in structured, collaborative tasks that both recycle and extend language. Students are gaining greater independence and becoming more conscious of their peers and social context. They are gaining a greater awareness of the world around them. Learners are noticing similarities and differences between Japanese language and culture and their own.

Japanese language learning and use

Learners use Japanese with peers and the teacher for a widening range of purposes: asking and responding to questions, exchanging information, expressing ideas and feelings, performing, responding to learning experiences, and interacting with Japanese language resources. They are developing greater fluency and accuracy in communication. As they draw on a growing range of vocabulary resources and grammatical structures, their pronunciation, intonation and phrasing improve. They begin to use Japanese more spontaneously when interacting with one another, and use an increasing range of body language and gestures. Shared tasks provide a context for purposeful language experience and experimentation. Focused attention on language structures, literacy skills development and exploration of cultural elements of communication are conducted at least in part in Japanese. Learners use digital media to support their learning in increasingly independent ways, such as exchanging resources and information with other Japanese speakers. In doing this, they may access music and media resources.

Contexts of interaction

Learners use Japanese with one another and with the teacher for a growing range of purposes. They may have some access to other Japanese speakers and cultural experiences in wider contexts and communities through the use of information and communications technology (ICT).

Texts and resources

Learners engage with a growing range of oral, written and multimodal texts, including published texts such as modified folk stories, songs and computer games, as well as teacher-generated resources such as language games, exercises and presentations. In addition, learners have some access to Japanese language and culture through texts created for young Japanese people, such as stories, music clips, anime/manga and video clips.

Features of Japanese language use

Learners notice the relationship between stress, pacing and meaning, and use appropriate intonation patterns to exclaim, make a statement or ask a question. They continue to acquire a wider range of vocabulary and to build grammatical and textual knowledge. They use verbs, nouns and adjectives, a variety of particles, prepositions, counters and conjunctions. They differentiate between animate and inanimate objects and apply their knowledge of こそあど in context. They develop metalanguage to describe patterns, rules and variations in language structures. As they use Japanese to interact in different situations, they develop understanding of how language and culture influence each other, and reflect on their own ways of communicating and using language. Learners begin to experience and reflect on the challenges and opportunities involved in moving between languages and different ways of making meaning.

Level of support

While learners work more independently at this level, ongoing support is incorporated into tasks and activities. Systematic feedback and review assist the interactive process of learning. Support includes provision of models, stimulus materials, scaffolded opportunities for reflection, and resources such as word and character charts, vocabulary lists, dictionaries and electronic reference materials. Learning tasks and activities take account of both learners’ current level of Japanese capability and their more general cognitive and social levels of development.

The role of English

While the use of Japanese in the classroom increases at this level, the use of English for discussion, reflection and explanation ensures the continued development of learners’ knowledge base and intercultural capability.


Years 5 and 6 Content Descriptions

Socialising

Interact with peers and the teacher to describe aspects of daily life such as routines and pastimes, or celebrations and special days; to express preferences; and to show interest in and respect for others

[Key concepts: communication, correspondence, exchange, interests; Key processes: interacting, communicating, greeting, describing] (ACLJAC145 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • communicating with peers and other Japanese speakers in local or online communities or digital forums, using strategies such as active listening skills, turn-taking cues, requests for clarification, and respectful language for agreeing or disagreeing, for example, へー、そうですね、すみません、もういちど おねがいします、ちょっと
  • showing interest in, respect and concern for others by asking questions such as だいじょうぶ です か。
  • exchanging simple correspondence such as greeting cards in print or digital form based on modelled language such as おたんじょうび おめでとう(ございます)。あけまして おめでとう ございます。おかあさん、ありがとう。~へ~より
  • using formulaic language to exchange emails with young Japanese speakers to provide personal information such as ~さんへ、~より、じゃあ また, their names, likes and dislikes, family members or leisure activities
  • exchanging information with one another or with other Japanese-speaking students about school or home routines, leisure activities, interests or preferences, popular culture or sport, for example, サッカー を します か。いつ  します か。()よう() に サッカー を します。サッカー  が  すき です か。ぼく も すき です。
  • recounting experiences with own family and friends, for example, ()よう() に ともだち と うみ に いきました。たん生日(じょうび) に ケーキ を たべました。
  • exchanging gifts using appropriate body language/gestures, such as giving and receiving with two hands and using expressions such as すみません。どうぞ 。どうも  ありがとう ございます。
Collaborate with peers to plan and conduct shared events or activities such as teaching and working with a buddy class, organising a shared event, or rehearsing and presenting a school performance

[Key concepts: collaboration, performance, transaction; Key processes: planning, organising, introducing, explaining, transacting, budgeting] (ACLJAC146 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • planning and organising activities such as a class event, visit or performance, using language related to place, people, time and numbers and creating promotional materials, for example, たいこ の えんそう、(もく)よう()、十一時、たいいくかん
  • creating a skit, performance or action game to introduce a buddy class to aspects of Japanese language and culture, for example, introducing hiragana, individual words or expressions, or behaviours such as bowing appropriately or receiving a gift
  • participating in simulated transactions such as purchasing goods or ordering food, using appropriate gestures, formulaic expressions and relevant question–answer exchanges such as いらっしゃいませ。これ を ください 。いくら です か 。3000 円 です。はい、どうぞ。
  • becoming familiar with the value of Japanese yen by carrying out real or simulated transactions and exchanges
  • budgeting for virtual shopping expeditions, for example, by consulting online catalogues and menus, comparing prices and values, and discussing intended purchases, using formulaic expressions such as ちょっと (たか)い です。でも、おいしそう です。
Participate in everyday classroom activities and routines such as asking how to say or write something, asking for help or repetition, praising or complimenting one another, thanking, apologising and expressing preferences

[Key concepts: roles, interaction, communication; Key processes: reading, naming, describing, requesting] (ACLJAC147 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • taking on different roles and responsibilities in the classroom (当番(とうばん)), such as taking the roll, identifying the day of the week, describing the weather or acting as monitor, for example, (ほん) を ください。ノート を ください。(どうも) ありがとう。
  • doing 日直(にっちょく), taking turns to lead the class in routines such as opening and closing lessons, for example, きり,つ れい、ちゃくせき, using appropriate gestures
  • indicating that something is either correct or incorrect using はい (>そうです) 。 ちがいます。
  • using appropriate language, actions and gestures to participate in interactions such as interrupting or asking for clarification, for example, 先生、すみません。 ちょっと わかりません。 ゆっくり (おねがいします) 。

Informing

Gather, classify and compare information from a range of sources related to concepts from other learning areas

[Key concepts: interests, behaviours, social interactions, cultural expression; Key processes: researching, compiling, presenting, identifying] (ACLJAC148 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • surveying and compiling information about young people’s interests and preferences in different contexts, such as favourite activities, television and websites, preferred means of transport or communication, or leisure activities at different times of the year, and presenting findings in formats such as flow charts, graphs, diagrams or oral presentations, for example, ぜんぶ で 二十人 です。六人 は ゲーム が すき です。
  • extracting key points from a range of spoken, written or digital texts on topics such as healthy eating, school lunches, or home or school routines, discussing findings and comparing opinions, for example, 日本人 は がっこう で そうじ を します。オーストラリア人 は そうじ を しません。
  • identifying points of information in texts such as advertisements, conversations, brochures or announcements, and representing them in different formats, such as charts, concept maps, skits or digital presentations
  • viewing video clips or reading simple texts containing social interactions such as exchanges between parents and children or customers and shop assistants, identifying and recording new words and expressions for use in their own language production
  • identifying words, expressions and behaviours associated with important Japanese cultural activities or events, and comparing them with equivalent Australian expressions or behaviours, for example, locating あけまして おめでとう ございます on a New Year’s card ((ねん)()(じょう))
Convey information on specific topics using formats such as oral or digital presentations, displays, diagrams, timelines and guided descriptions

[Key concepts: content, profile, audience, format; Key processes: presenting, profiling, referencing] (ACLJAC149 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Sustainability
  • organising and presenting information relating to aspects of Japanese culture, for example, fashion, famous landmarks/icons or festivals, using supporting resources such as sound, visuals or graphics, and providing a structured summary, for example,  です。高い です。そして、ゆうめい です。かざん です。 or さっぽろ です。さっぽろ は とても さむい です。ゆき が ふります。ふゆ に ゆきまつり が あります。
  • creating a profile in digital format of a context, situation or event for a specified audience, such as a virtual tour of the school or classroom for an intending exchange student group or sister school
  • creating a class book or digital display about topics that connect with other curriculum areas and are relevant to their own lives, such as sports, environmental sustainability, transport or health
    • Sustainability

Creating

Listen to, read and view different imaginative texts such as anime, folk stories and manga, describe and give opinions about characters and events, and identify cultural elements

[Key concepts: character, plot, context, values, emotion; Key processes: analysing, discussing, responding, expressing, comparing] (ACLJAC150 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • discussing key messages in print, digital or multimodal texts, such as the moral of a folk story, ideas or values expressed in songs or characterisation in anime, and comparing their treatment across cultural contexts and time
  • recalling and/or illustrating main characters and events in stories, songs or anime, for example, by responding to questions such as だれ、いつ、どこ
  • responding to simple spoken, written or digital narratives such as folk tales, anime, manga or films that evoke positive or negative emotions such as happiness, amusement or affection, fear or anger, connecting these with their own experiences by using stem statements such as わくわく します。だいすき です 。こわい です。どきどき します。びっくり しました。へん です ね 。
Create and present or perform imaginative texts for a variety of purposes and audiences

[Key concepts: performance, audience, rhythm, digital text; Key processes: creating, performing, designing] (ACLJAC151 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • creating and performing a presentation for a particular audience, for example, a puppet show or play for a buddy class or a performance for the school or community
  • designing and presenting a commercial for a new or existing product likely to appeal to consumers in their age group
  • creating a rap or song that involves experimentation with rhyme and rhythm
  • teaching younger children songs that involve repetitive phrases and actions, for example, songs from popular anime films
  • using familiar and modelled language to create imaginative digital texts, such as a photo story, an e-book or profile of an imagined avatar, for example, これ は たからじま です。大きい とりい と、(ちい)さい とりい が  あります。じてんしゃ で、大きい とりい に いきます。大きい とりい の (した) にはこ が あります。はこ の (なか) に (きん) が あります。
  • producing and presenting picture books/Big Books/mini books or short scripted scenarios for younger students, incorporating elements of Japanese language and culture that are likely to be unfamiliar, engaging or challenging

Translating

Explain aspects of spoken, written and non-verbal communication in Japanese interactions that require interpretation and carry cultural meaning

[Key concepts: meaning, culture, interpretation, equivalence; Key processes: explaining, interpreting, demonstrating, experimenting, reflecting] (ACLJAC152 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • providing explanations or interpretations of formulaic expressions such as おめでとう used in a range of situations and celebrations, for example, congratulations おめでとう ございます and birthday wishes おたんじょうび  おめでとう
  • collecting, using and explaining Japanese words and expressions that do not translate easily into English, such as おかえり、いらっしゃいませ、ごちそうさま
  • demonstrating and explaining elements of non-verbal Japanese communication that require interpretation for non-Japanese speakers, such as hand gestures, eye contact and counting systems
  • experimenting with bilingual dictionaries and/or online translators, considering relative advantages or limitations of each resource
Create bilingual texts and learning resources such as displays, websites, posters, picture books, games, word banks and menus

[Key concepts: bilingualism, learning resources, translation; Key processes: classifying, glossing, annotating, composing] (ACLJAC153 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • creating shared bilingual learning resources such as print or digital word banks or glossaries of Japanese and English expressions used in formal and informal everyday interactions
  • performing a role-play or skit for an audience, using Japanese for the performance and English for supporting explanations
  • using dictionaries and electronic translation tools to compose bilingual texts such as captions, menus, posters or invitations, comparing results and identifying how bilingual texts support intercultural communication
  • creating bilingual texts for the classroom or school community, for example, invitations to attend class or school assembly performances, posters advertising Languages Day

Reflecting

Reflect on the experience of learning and using Japanese, and identify how language reflects cultural practices and norms

[Key concepts: language, culture, similarity and difference, values; Key processes: identifying, analysing, comparing, reflecting] (ACLJAC154 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • identifying frequently used Japanese phrases and behaviours in everyday social exchanges that reflect cultural traditions or values that appear different to their own, for example, おてがみ ありがとう ございます。いらっしゃいませ。
  • comparing their own and one another’s reactions to the experience of learning Japanese, and considering whether their attitudes or understandings have changed in relation to cultural diversity and intercultural experience
  • reflecting on the experience of using Japanese language, gestures and body language, and considering how their responses reflect their own attitudes and experience
  • noticing aspects of communication and cultural expression represented in Japanese stories, songs or audio/visual media, responding to teacher prompts such as ‘What do you see?’ ‘What do you notice about …?’ ‘Why do you think …?’ ‘How is this similar/different to …?’
Discuss the experience of speaking and interacting in a different language, what they understand by ‘identity’, and whether learning Japanese has any effect on their sense of self

[Key concepts: identity, communication, stereotype, protocol; Key processes: reflecting, identifying, exploring] (ACLJAC155 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • identifying elements of identity that are important across all cultures, for example, family, community, location
  • creating multimodal texts that represent elements of their own identity, such as personal emblems/mottos, self-profile, photo journal, or caricature/self-portrait, and considering how Japanese children of the same age might respond to these
  • exploring the idea of stereotypes and how people think about others from different cultural backgrounds
  • practising formulaic expressions such as those exchanged before and after meals or when giving or receiving gifts or food, for example, いただきます、ごちそうさまでした, and reflecting on the experience of using such exchanges
  • considering whether learning and using Japanese impacts on their sense of identity or influences their behaviour in or out of the classroom, for example, when playing Japanese games online, eating in Japanese restaurants and reading signs or menus

Systems of language

Engage with authentic spoken language, recognising how words blend and understanding the relationship between sounds, words and meaning

[Key concepts: phonemic awareness, spelling, rhythm; Key processes: identifying, discriminating, pronouncing, spelling] (ACLJAU156 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • knowing how to pronounce all the sounds in the kana chart, including voiced and unvoiced sounds (てんてん and まる), combined and long vowel sounds and double consonants, for example, きって and りょうり
  • understanding that the sounds of hiragana and katakana are identical even though the associated scripts are different
  • knowing that the hiragana spelling of a particular particle does not match its pronunciation, for example, ‘wa’ for , ‘e’ for , ‘o/wo’ for
  • noticing that certain combinations of two moras make one rhythm unit (foot), for example, the copula です and the verb suffix ます
Recognise some single and whole word katakana and develop the ability to use hiragana and kanji in a single text

[Key concepts: scripts, characters, stroke order, punctuation; Key processes: reading, writing, recognising] (ACLJAU157 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • reading and writing all hiragana (including voiced, combined and long vowel sounds and double consonants) using the kana chart
  • learning that kanji were brought from China and that hiragana was formed by simplifying the form of kanji, while katakana was formed using a part of kanji
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • learning to apply the basic principles of stroke order to write all hiragana and high-frequency kanji such as 月、日、木、人
  • recognising frequently used katakana words such as オーストラリア
  • reading and writing words, phrases and sentences using kana, for example, わたし の 本、これ は かぞく です。
  • understanding the use of basic Japanese punctuation marks such as まる(。) and てん(、), and katakana long vowel marks, for example, in a student’s name such as ルーク
  • understanding the use of furigana as a reading aid
Recognise the systematic nature of Japanese grammatical rules and apply these to generate new language for a range of purposes

[Key concepts: metalanguage, grammar, counters; Key processes: identifying, explaining, discriminating, applying] (ACLJAU158 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • expanding metalanguage for communicating about language, using additional terms such as ‘pronoun’ and ‘conjunction’
  • understanding and identifying elements of different sentence structures and the use of particles such as へ、で
  • understanding the use of ~が あります/います。 to refer to inanimate/animate objects
  • describing locations of homes, people, animals and items, using basic structures, for example, noun  place に  あります。 noun  place に います。
  • knowing how to use prepositions to describe the position of objects, for example, つくえ の 上 に, いす の 下  に
  • understanding the use of こそあど series in concrete contexts, for example, これ、それ、あれ、どれ
  • using the verb form as a formulaic expression, such as when giving instructions or seeking permission, for example, 見て ください。トイレ に いっても いい です か。
  • knowing how to use common counters and classifiers such as ~こ、~ひき/ びき/ ぴき、~えん
  • understanding Japanese numerical place order: 一、十、(ひゃく)(せん)(まん)
  • understanding location words and expressions indicating direction or means of transportation, for example, くるま で がっこう に いきます。
  • understanding different question words such as いくら、どれ
  • using conjunctions such as そして、それから to link ideas
Recognise the use of formulaic expressions and textual features in familiar texts such as emails, letters, postcards or telephone conversations

[Key concepts: textual features, context, variation; Key processes: recognising, identifying, explaining, reflecting] (ACLJAU159 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • recognising the order for writing the components of the date in Japanese, for example, (ねん)、月、日、よう日
  • understanding the significance of features of different types of texts, such as opening and closing emails, letters or phone conversations, for example, ~さんへ、~より、もしもし
  • considering how the composition of texts in different languages reflects cultural values, such as the ordering of information on Japanese ID cards or when kanji or Arabic numerals are used in Japanese texts
  • understanding conventions associated with using げんこうようし、for example, the size of small characters, the position in the square and the placing of punctuation

Language variation and change

Understand that different ways of using Japanese language shape and reflect different relationships, such as deciding to be formal or informal

[Key concepts: register, context, tenor; Key processes: observing, reflecting, comparing] (ACLJAU160 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • noticing that language can be made casual or ‘softer’ by adding particular endings, such as そうですね。すみません。 ちょっと。
  • observing how language use reflects respect and social distance, such as showing respect for authority figures, for example, しつれいします。よろしく おねがいします。, or expressing familiarity with friends by using first names rather than surnames
  • noticing differences in interaction styles in some familiar situations in Japanese and Australian contexts, such as interactions in classrooms or shops
Recognise that the Japanese language is both influenced by in turn influences other languages and cultures

[Key concepts: language contact, word borrowing, globalisation, technology, change; Key processes: identifying, classifying, reflecting] (ACLJAU161 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
  • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • exploring how the Japanese language is influenced by other languages and cultures, for example, in relation to food パン、スパゲッティー、クレープ、ハンバーガー, music and sport ミュージカル、ロック、ダンス、サッカー、バスケットボール, and technology パソコン、メール、インターネット
  • investigating the influence of Japanese language and culture on their own language and experience, for example, by creating a glossary of Japanese words and expressions used in fields such as martial arts (‘judo’, ‘karate’, ‘sensei’, ‘sumo’), food (‘sushi’, ‘tofu’, ‘wasabi’) or communication/culture (‘haiku’, ‘anime’, ‘manga’, ‘sudoku’)
  • understanding that there are Japanese-speaking communities outside Japan, for example, in Hawaii and South America, and that Japanese is widely taught in many countries around the world, including Australia and other countries of the Asia-Pacific region
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • understanding that all languages change, that some are constantly growing and expanding while others are disappearing or being revived, for example, many indigenous languages, including Aboriginal languages and Torres Strait Islander languages
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures

Role of language and culture

Make connections between cultural practices and values and language use, such as formulaic expressions, and consider how these affect intercultural communication

[Key concepts: language, culture, expression, values, perspectives; Key processes: noticing, identifying, comparing, reflecting] (ACLJAU162 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
  • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • noticing ways in which Japanese language and behaviour reflect values and traditions, for example, reluctance to volunteer or compete for attention in class, responding to compliments じょうず です ね。いいえ, and prioritising the group rather than the individual
  • understanding that people ‘read’ intercultural experiences in different ways depending on their cultural perspective, recognising the validity of different perspectives and questioning notions of ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ ideas
  • imagining potential challenges for a visiting Japanese student spending time in an Australian classroom, and identifying phrases, expressions and behaviours that may need explaining, and elements of interaction, such as the use of personal space or volume of voice, that may appear inappropriate
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • reflecting on how different languages and cultures represented in the classroom influence ways of communicating about or relating to social and physical environments, for example, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander traditions in relation to place, language and culture
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
  • identifying and comparing traditional and contemporary cultural images used in Japanese and Australian print and media advertising and tourist brochures, considering when they are used and what message they convey
  • noticing similarities and differences between their own ways of communicating and observed interactions between young Japanese speakers in contexts such as everyday social situations or online forums, for example, responding to offers of food or drink, turn-taking in conversations

Years 5 and 6 Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 6, students use formulaic and modelled language in classroom interactions to carry out transactions and to share or convey information about daily routines, activities and events, using time expressions such as まい日、ときどき. They ask and respond to questions in familiar contexts using complete sentences and appropriate pronunciation, rhythm and intonation. They ask for clarification and assistance, negotiate turn-taking and follow instructions. They extend their answers by using conjunctions such as そして、それから. They show concern for and interest in others by making enquiries such as だいじょうぶ?, and apologise and express thanks using appropriate gestures. They read and write all hiragana, including voiced sounds, long vowel sounds, double consonants and blends, and high-frequency kanji, for example, (いぬ), 小さい、(あめ). Students locate specific information and some supporting details in a range of spoken, written and multimodal texts on familiar topics. They express reactions to imaginative texts, such as by describing qualities of characters, for example, やさしい 人 です。. They create connected texts of a few sentences, such as descriptions, dialogues or skits. They structure sentences using particles, for example, へ、で、を、がand prepositions, for example, (うえ), and apply the rules of punctuation when writing. They describe and recount events and experiences in time, for example, adjective です。noun です/でした。 and present/past/negative verb forms, for example, のみます、たべます、()ました、いきません. They use counter classifiers in response to questions such as いくら です か。なんびきなんこ?. Students translate familiar texts, recognising formulaic expressions and culturally specific textual features and language use. They comment on similarities and differences in ways of expressing values such as politeness, consideration and respect in Japanese compared to other languages and cultures.

Students understand and use the hiragana chart to pronounce contracted and blended sounds and exceptions to phonetic rules, such as を、へ、は, and です. They understand and apply the rules and phonetic changes related to counter classifiers, such as さんぜんえん、いっこ、はっぴき. They apply their knowledge of stroke order to form characters. They give examples of ways in which languages both change over time and are influenced by other languages and cultures. They identify words from other languages used in Japanese, such as パソコン、メール、パスタ, and how the pronunciation, form and meaning of borrowed words can change when used in Japanese. Students identify behaviours and values associated with Japanese society and incorporate these into their own language use, such as ways of deflecting praise, for example, じょうず です ね。いいえ。.


Years 5 and 6 Work Sample Portfolios