Japanese

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Context statement

The place of Japanese culture and language in Australia and in the world
Japanese is the official language of Japan, Australia’s northern neighbour in the Asia region. It is also widely used by communities of speakers in Hawaii, Peru and Brazil, and learnt as an additional language by large numbers of students in the Republic of Korea, China, Indonesia and Australia.

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PDF documents

Resources and support materials for the Australian Curriculum: Languages - Japanese are available as PDF documents. 
Languages - Japanese: Sequence of content
Languages - Japanese: Sequence of Achievement - F-10 Sequence
Languages - Japanese: Sequence …

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Years 7 and 8

Years 7 and 8 Band Description

The nature of the learners

Students are beginning their study of Japanese and typically have had little prior exposure to the language and associated culture. Many will have learnt an additional language in primary school, while some have proficiency in different home languages and bring existing language learning strategies and intercultural awareness to the new experience of learning Japanese. Students’ textual knowledge developed through English literacy learning supports the development of literacy in Japanese. Skills in analysing, comparing and reflecting on language and culture in both languages are mutually supportive. Students may need encouragement to take risks in learning a new language at this stage of social development and to consider issues of how the experience impacts on their sense of ‘norms’ associated with their first language and culture.

Japanese language learning and use

Students are encouraged to speak, listen to, read and write Japanese in a range of interactions with the teacher and one another. They use modelled and rehearsed language and gestures in familiar contexts and begin to use learnt language to express their personal meaning. They experiment with sounds and use high-frequency words and expressions, gradually broadening their range of vocabulary and language functions. They develop knowledge of Japanese word order and of grammatical features such as particles, adjectives, verb tenses and politeness forms. They apply this knowledge in simple oral and written texts such as self-introductions and statements relating to themselves and their personal worlds. They become aware of the systematic nature of Japanese grammar and of its importance in conveying meaning. They develop metalanguage to talk about Japanese grammar and to make comparisons and connections with their own language(s).

Students are exposed to all three scripts, hiragana, katakana and kanji, and develop a working knowledge of how these are used to create meaning. They develop proficiency in reading and writing hiragana and use high-frequency katakana and kanji to read and write words and sentences. They work collaboratively and independently, exploring a variety of simple texts with particular reference to their current social, cultural and communicative interests.

Students read, view and listen to a range of texts, and apply modelled language to create and present their own texts. They share grammatical knowledge and language resources to plan, problem-solve, monitor and reflect. They begin to use vocabulary and grammar accurately, drafting and editing texts to improve structure and to clarify meaning. They develop linguistic and cultural awareness through analysing texts, comparing languages, and applying their knowledge in language exercises and tasks.

Learners use a range of processes such as observing, comparing and reflecting on language use to identify how cultural values and perspectives are embedded in language and how language choices determine how people, issues and circumstances are represented. They reflect on intercultural perspectives and on their experience of intercultural communication, exploring aspects of environment, lifestyle and social practices associated with Japanese culture and making comparisons with their own. They develop metalanguage for discussing the nature of language and culture, and monitor and reflect on their language and culture learning through discussion, journalling or contributing to shared digital spaces.

Contexts of interaction

Japanese is used by the teacher and learners in classroom routines, structured interactions and learning tasks. Opportunities for interaction in Japanese are also provided through a range of resources and materials. There may be interaction beyond the classroom with guests or members of Japanese-speaking communities or via digital technology or student exchanges.

Texts and resources

Learners work with a range of resources designed for language learning, such as textbooks, audio recordings, teacher-generated materials and online resources. They read, view and interact with a variety of spoken, written and digital texts created for different purposes (social, informative, transactional, imaginative and expressive). Authentic texts such as advertisements, commercials, film excerpts or recorded conversations provide opportunities for discussion and analysis of the relationship between language, communication and culture.

Features of Japanese language use

Learners become familiar with the sounds and patterns of spoken Japanese, including pronunciation, rhythm and intonation. They identify words borrowed from English, noting differences in pronunciation and spelling. They use Japanese in classroom interactions and short communicative tasks. They participate in scaffolded activities to exchange information and complete transactions. They listen to and read texts to obtain specific details or to understand gist. Learners understand and apply rules/patterns applying to elements of Japanese grammar such as word order, simple verb forms, nouns, adjectives and particles. They understand that language is organised as text, and that texts use different structures and language features to achieve different purposes. They use modelled examples and apply knowledge of language features to create texts for different purposes, such as informative, personal or descriptive. Students develop an awareness of different cultural perspectives. They identify words, phrases and behaviours that convey Japanese traditions and values such as politeness and humility and use these appropriately.

Level of support

Learning at this level is supported by rich and varied language input and the provision of experiences that are challenging but achievable. Opportunities to review and consolidate learning are balanced against provision of engaging and relevant new experiences and connections. Learners rely on teacher talk, instruction, modelling, feedback, and structured opportunities for practising and understanding new language. They are supported to develop increasing autonomy as language learners and users. Support resources include word lists and dictionaries, visual organisers, images and gestures. Learners collaborate with peers in structured pair and group tasks that have clear roles and expectations.

The role of English

English serves two main functions in the Japanese class: it represents a point of reference for learning the new language by enabling students to compare structures, features and cultural meanings in each language, and it is used when appropriate for explanation, reflection and discussion.


Years 7 and 8 Content Descriptions

Socialising

Interact with peers and the teacher to socialise and to exchange information about self, personal worlds and immediate environment, and to express feelings, likes and dislikes, using appropriate gestures

[Key concepts: self, family, home, interests; Key processes: interacting, describing, expressing] (ACLJAC001 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • exchanging greetings depending on the time of day, for example, おはよう ございます。こんにちは。, using appropriate titles and terms of address, such as 先生(せんせい) or Simon さん、 and gestures such as bowing to show respect
  • giving and receiving items using culturally appropriate gestures and language, for example, どうぞ。どうも ありがとう。
  • exchanging personal details with Japanese-speaking peers via online or virtual forums, for example, providing name, age, school, and language(s) spoken at home
  • introducing themselves (じこしょうかい) using culturally appropriate formulaic expressions and gestures, はじめまして 、どうぞ よろしく。、 with bowing and appropriate eye contact
  • describing aspects of their personal worlds, for example, friends, family, pets, teachers, school and interests, using expressions such as noun  adjective です。わたしの ともだちは おもしろい です。
  • exchanging information about daily or leisure activities or events via face-to-face or online modes of communication such as blogs or virtual conversations, and comparing experiences with those of Japanese-speaking peers, using cohesive devices such as conjunctions when sequencing or elaborating, for example, (にち)よう()に えいがに()きます。それから、かいものを します。 or すしが()き です。でも、さしみが ()きじゃない です。
  • expressing likes and dislikes, for example, スポーツが ()き です。しゅくだいは ちょっと…。
  • using formulaic language to express feelings, for example, おなかが ぺこぺこ です。つかれました 。さむい です。どきどき します。
Engage in transactions and collaborative activities that involve planning and making arrangements, such as obtaining goods and organising performances

[Key concepts: tasks, transactions, collaboration; Key processes: planning, making arrangements, purchasing, performing, participating] (ACLJAC002 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • working together to create displays, presentations or performances to showcase their Japanese learning for family, friends or school community
  • following instructions, for example, following a recipe to make やきそば, おこのみやき、まきずし or making origami
  • making arrangements using language related to place, time and activity, for example, ()よう()に テニスを しますか。()よう()は ちょっと…。
  • participating in scenarios that involve ordering and purchasing goods such as food and drink, for example, すしを ください。おちゃ、おねがいします。いくらですか。
  • participating in class activities such as word, board or electronic games, using set phrases in Japanese such as わたしの ばん、みぎ、ひだ、かった!、まけた、ざんねん、だめだった、だいじょうぶ?、がんばって!、 つぎは だれ?、いち、に、さん
Interact in classroom routines and exchanges such as asking and responding to questions, requesting help, repetition or permission, following instructions, or giving praise and encouragement

[Key concepts: roles, routines, interaction patterns; Key processes: responding, requesting, apologising, thanking] (ACLJAC003 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • using set phrases, formulaic expressions and appropriate gestures for regular classroom routines such as opening and closing lessons and responding to roll call, for example, きりつ, れい, ちゃくせき、はい、います。いません。
  • asking the meaning of words and how to say something in Japanese, requesting repetition and indicating whether or not they understand, for example, はい、わかりました。いいえ、ちょっと わかりません。日本語(にほんご)で (なん) ですか。すみません、もう いちど。
  • using formulaic expressions to ask for clarification (for example, ~は えい()で (なん) ですか。十四(じゅうよん)ページ ですか。) or permission (for example,トイレに ()っても いい ですか。), to apologise for lateness or interrupting (for example, すみません、ちょっと いい ですか。おくれて すみません。), and to borrow classroom objects (for example,えんぴつを かして ください。けしゴム、ありますか。)
  • using appropriate language and behaviour when giving and receiving classroom objects, for example, どうぞ。ありがとう ございます。
  • following instructions to complete an activity or to get organised, for example, たって ください。三人(さんにん)グループに なって ください。
  • praising, complimenting and encouraging others, for example, じょうず ですね。いい ですね。よく できました。すごい ですね。もうちょっと です。がんばりましょう。

Informing

Locate key points of information in a range of texts and resources and use the information in new ways

[Key concepts: information, data, culture; Key processes: researching, classifying, interpreting, presenting] (ACLJAC004 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • identifying key information such as names of people and places, times and activities in familiar types of texts such as conversations, profiles, emails and announcements
  • gathering, classifying and summarising results of class surveys on topics such as students’ likes and interests, family, neighbourhood, activities or habits, and presenting findings to others, for example, ひるごはんに (なに)を ()べますか。(にち)よう()に (なに)を しますか。しゅうまつに どこに ()きますか。
  • listening to and reading texts and reorganising information to present in new ways, for example, by sequencing activities chronologically by completing a timetable or timeline, chart, table or itinerary
  • reading, listening to and viewing texts such as video clips, brochures, websites, menus, labels and packaging to obtain information about aspects of Japanese culture, for example, daily routines, food, writing systems, significant places or geography
  • locating, interpreting, classifying and listing factual information from modified texts such as notices, timetables, announcements, advertisements or signs
  • identifying cultural values reflected in a range of texts, such as the use of symbols, signs or images in advertising
Present factual information about aspects of Japanese and Australian lifestyles in spoken, written and digital forms

[Key concepts: community, cultural practice, personal world; Key processes: composing, designing, presenting, reporting, comparing] (ACLJAC005 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • creating and presenting a profile of a well-known Japanese or Australian person, including details, for example, とし、かぞく、 and ()きなこと such as ()べもの、スポーツ、 かもく、どうぶつ
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • planning and preparing short spoken, written or digital presentations on aspects of daily life and social/cultural practices in Japan or Australia, such as school, leisure, daily routines, celebrations or festivals, using supporting resources such as sound, images or graphics
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • reporting on events and activities in their immediate environment or personal worlds, such as through a personal blog, digital post, formal speech, diagrams, charts or illustrated schedules, for example, きのう サッカーの しあい でした。わたしの がっこうの チームは かちました。
  • creating a video clip to communicate specific information to a particular audience, such as a visual or virtual introduction to their family or neighbourhood or a glimpse into a week in the life of an Australian teenager for potential exchange student groups
  • creating a comparative report on aspects of Japanese and Australian lifestyles, such as climate, students’ interests or daily routines, using formats such as data displays, charts or graphs to identify similarities and differences, for example, オーストラリア(じん)は フットボールが すき です。でも、日本人(にほんじん)は やきゅうが すき です。(いま) オーストラリアは (あき) です。でも、日本(にほん)は (はる) です。

Creating

Listen to, read and view texts such as folk stories, video clips and television commercials, share reactions and describe aspects such as characters and contexts

[Key concepts: imagination, fantasy, character, effects, values; Key processes: responding, reflecting, creating, comparing] (ACLJAC006 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
  • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • reading and viewing texts such as anime, manga, video clips or lyrics of J-pop, responding to questions about characters, lyrics or events, for example, だれ ですか。()>まえは (なん) ですか。(なん)の イベント ですか。どこ ですか。、 or re-creating elements by means of a storyboard, timeline or original performance
  • responding to structured stimulus questions about characters, places, events or effects in imaginative texts such as stories, films and anime, using modelled language and formulaic expressions to express reactions, for example, やさしい (ひと)せが たかい です。おもしろい はなし ですね。ちょっと こわい です。かなしい です。たのしかった です。びっくり しました。どきどき しました。
  • comparing and reflecting on ideas, values and key messages in Japanese texts, such as the moral of a story or folk tale, identifying ideas and themes that may be similar or different across cultures, for example, Japanese concepts of おんがえし、 working hard, consideration of others and humility
  • discussing which animals often feature in Japanese folk tales and what characteristics are attributed to them, for example, つる in つるのおんがえし、さる and かに in さるかにがっせん、 and comparing with animals that feature in folk stories from other languages and cultures from the Asia-Pacific region, such as Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stories
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • exploring the idea of changing values and behaviours as represented in contemporary imaginative and creative texts such as television shows and/or commercials, video clips, jingles and computer games
Reinterpret or create and perform imaginative texts such as video clips, raps or skits using modelled language and supporting resources

[Key concepts: adaptation, mode, performance, intercultural experience; Key processes: creating, interpreting, expressing, performing] (ACLJAC007 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • creating imaginative texts to share with others, for example, a commercial for a new or existing product, a comic strip, a jingle, song or rap
  • producing short scripted plays or video clips to perform or present to others who are learning Japanese, experimenting with rhyme, rhythm and onomatopoeia
  • composing and performing an imagined scenario or skit designed to support intercultural understanding and involving elements such as comedy, emotion or surprise, for example, いただきます。いってらっしゃい。もしもし。こんにちは。
  • creating imaginative stories using a variety of resources and modes of presentation such as video clips or digital photo montages
  • designing texts for real or imagined special occasions that include the expression of culturally appropriate behaviour, for example, ねんがじょう、(はは)()M

Translating

Translate and interpret short texts such as self-introductions or conversations, noticing and explaining aspects that are similar or different in Japanese and English versions

[Key concepts: meaning, translation, equivalence, context; Key processes: translating, interpreting, comparing, explaining] (ACLJAC008 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • collaborating with peers and the teacher to translate and interpret familiar texts in Japanese such as emails and phone conversations between friends or self-introductions, noticing similarities and differences between Japanese interactions and their own communicative style
  • interpreting words and expressions encountered in simple Japanese texts such as greeting cards, menus or stories that do not translate easily into English and that reflect aspects of Japanese culture, for example, ていしょく、いただきます、 the use of ‘happy’ in English compared to おめでとう in Japanese, しつれいします、はじめまして、どうぞよろしく
  • comparing own translations of simple texts with peers’, explaining why words or expressions were translated in particular ways and considering reasons for any differences
  • learning to use dictionaries and electronic translation tools, identifying issues such as multiple meanings of words and the need to consider context
  • comparing the meaning and use of emoticons in Japanese and English
Create simple bilingual texts and resources such as learning support materials, menus, brochures, signs, digital presentations, displays and captions

[Key concepts: bilingualism, equivalence, context, meaning; Key processes: translating, reasoning, explaining] (ACLJAC009 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Sustainability
  • creating written or digital bilingual resources to support their language learning, such as captions for photo stories or displays, glossaries or personal Japanese–English dictionaries, with examples and explanations of terms or expressions that have cultural associations
  • preparing bilingual captions for texts such as a newsletter item for the school community or for Japanese-speaking peers, exploring how to convey specific ideas in two different languages
  • interpreting aspects of spoken Japanese texts for others, for example, providing an English commentary on a Japanese item at a class, school or community event, assembly or parent evening, explaining culturally significant expressions and gestures
  • creating bilingual menus, signs or brochures for the school or local community, such as information about caring for the environment or school resources
    • Sustainability

Reflecting

Reflect on the experience of learning and using Japanese in different contexts, commenting on similarities to and differences from their own usual language use and behaviour

[Key concepts: intercultural experience, cultural frames, response; Key processes: identifying, reflecting, expressing] (ACLJAC010 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • adopting Japanese ways of communicating that reflect cultural values and practices such as the expression of respect or familiarity, for example, (はは)、ママ and (かあ)さん、~さん and ~せんせい
  • describing and demonstrating differences in ways of showing consideration for others in Japanese, for example, using particular terms of address, register and body language in greetings, such asおはよう。 versus おはようございます。、 or forms of respect or apology when entering a classroom しつれいします。、 at mealtimes いただきます。or when interrupting someoneすみません。
  • reflecting on aspects of the experience of using Japanese that highlight intercultural differences relating to social and communicative behaviours, for example, the use of personal space and body language, and ways of accepting or refusing an offer
  • observing live or recorded interactions in different Japanese-language contexts, identifying aspects that they find confusing or surprising, for example, gestures (おじぎ), levels of politeness, ways of requesting, thanking or greeting, or the exchange of business cards, and comparing to own cultural forms of expression and social interaction
  • developing language for expressing personal reactions to and feelings about intercultural experience, for example, いいですね。 あれ? へえ すごい!びっくりした!すみません。
  • noticing that a focus on ‘self’ is avoided in Japanese by the minimal use of the pronoun ‘I’ in interactions
Collate and present information in print, digital or online formats about self and peers to share with others, and notice own and one another’s ways of expressing identity

[Key concepts: self-expression, identity, community, communication; Key processes: reflecting, comparing, identifying] (ACLJAC011 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • identifying elements of identity that may be important across all cultures, for example, family, community, location, language, religion, age, gender
  • sharing reactions to intercultural experiences, and considering whether their individual background, age and interests contribute to attitudes and/or beliefs that impact on the experience
  • preparing a digital class profile to exchange with Japanese-speaking students, showing the cultural backgrounds, interests and personalities of each class member using images, captions and symbols
  • creating a print or digital personal ‘cultural ID profile’ to exchange with Japanese-speaking peers, making decisions about what points of information will be of most interest, for example, by creating a family tree with associated links to cultural connections, languages spoken, interests and activities
  • comparing and reflecting on how identity is expressed across cultures and languages, considering the idea of ‘belonging’ and the relative importance of group or family membership as expressed in different languages

Systems of language

Recognise and use features of the Japanese sound system, including pitch, accent, rhythm and intonation

[Key concepts: mora, pitch, rhythm, intonation; Key processes: listening, distinguishing, recognising] (ACLJAU012 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • understanding the system of Japanese sound combinations, that Japanese has five vowels and that a vowel can be attached to all consonants except ‘
  • accurately pronouncing all combinations of hiragana and katakana, including voiced and unvoiced forms and all combined sounds (contractions and blends)
  • understanding that the sounds of hiragana and katakana are identical even though the associated scripts are different
  • recognising that in the copula desu and the verb suffix masu, the ‘u’ is devoiced in normal speech
  • using available combinations of katakana to experiment with the Japanese pronunciation of loan words, for example, レストラン
  • recognising the basic unit of sound in Japanese (‘mora’: モーラ or ), for example, こんにちは has five moras
  • becoming familiar with the rhythm of Japanese, recognising the concept of the ‘foot’ (フット) as the minimum unit of rhythm, and that one foot in Japanese consists of two moras, for example, ごちそうさま is pronounced as a three-foot word
Recognise and understand the relationship between the character-based scripts of hiragana, katakana and kanji

[Key concepts: script, kana, kanji, hiragana, katakana, furigana, stroke order, pictograph; Key processes: recognising, copying, applying, distinguishing] (ACLJAU013 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • understanding that the Japanese language uses three different scripts depending on word origins and on the context of language use
  • reading and writing all hiragana and katakana, including voiced, contracted and blended sounds, using the kana chart
  • using the kana chart as a systematic framework to support learning
  • recognising that Japanese can be written vertically or horizontally and has various typefaces in printed form
  • understanding the use of basic Japanese punctuation marks such as a まる (。) 、 てん (、) and katakana long vowel mark (), for example, in a student’s name such as サリー
  • applying the principles of stroke order to write all kana and high-frequency kanji such as ()きます、 月、 (おお)きい
  • knowing that kanji were brought from China and that hiragana was formed by simplifying the form of kanji, while katakana was formed using a part of kanji
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • understanding that each individual kanji represents meaning as well as sound, such as (‘sun’, ‘day’), and that some kanji come from pictographs, for example,
  • learning to write high-frequency kanji, such as numbers, days of the week, family members, and basic adjectives and verbs, applying the basic principles for stroke order, for example, (ちち)(はは)(ちい)さい、 ()ます、日本語(にほんご)
  • understanding the use of furigana as a tool to support reading
Develop understanding of the systematic nature of grammatical structures and features of Japanese used to perform particular functions, such as describing people, objects and places, and indicating quantity

[Key concepts: grammar, vocabulary, syntax, metalanguage; Key processes: recognising, describing, indicating, comparing] (ACLJAU014 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • developing metalanguage for communicating about language, using terms such as ‘noun’, ‘pronoun’, ‘verb’, ‘adjective’ and ‘conjunction’, and cross-referencing with knowledge of English-language syntax and parts of speech
  • understanding the rule that Japanese sentences end with a predicate and that there are three types of predicates, noun plus copula, adjective plus copula, and verb:
    • subject noun です。
    • subject adjective です。
    • subject  object verb ます。
  • understanding that pronouns are used far less frequently in Japanese than in English
  • understanding and using a range of particles to perform different functions, for example:
    • (subject, topic marker)
    • (subject, topic marker: ~が()きです、 ~がいます/あります)
    • (object)
    • (time, destination)
    • (direction)
    • (transport)
    • (possession)
    • (and, with)
    • (also)
  • understanding the role of sentence-ending particles such as and
  • understanding that the word order of noun phrases is not important as long as they appear before the verb and are accompanied by correct particles
  • understanding how to use and adjectives in the present tense in basic sentences such as たのしい、 たのしくない、 ゆうめいな、 ゆうめいじゃない
  • understanding the rules of verb conjugation, for example, ます、 ~ましょう、 ~ました、 ~ません、 ~ませんでした
  • understanding different question words such as (なに), どこ、 (なん)よう()、 どんな、 いつ、 いくら、 だれ
  • describing locations of homes, people and things using basic structures such as noun  place に あります。 noun  place に います。
  • using a range of verbs related to daily activities, for example, ()きます、 ()ます、 たべます、 かきます、 よみます、 ききます、 はなします、 します
  • understanding and responding to formulaic expressions that use form, such as ()て ください。 トイレに ()っても いい ですか 。
  • creating cohesion and flow using conjunctions, for example, そして、 それから、 でも
  • knowing how to count (いち)(せん)
  • using common counters and classifiers such as ~人、 ~さい、 ~がつ、 ~()
  • understanding the use of こそあどseries in concrete contexts, for example, これ、 それ、 あれ、 どれ
  • using basic time expressions such as days of the week and months, for example, まい(にち)、 ときどき
  • building vocabulary that relates to familiar environments such as the classroom, family and personal world and that can be used for cross-curricular content learning
  • understanding the use of the prefixes and before some words to indicate respect, for example,
    おなまえは?、ごかぞく 
  • understanding that the words for family members are different for one’s own family and for other people’s families, for example, (かあ)さん、(はは)
  • identifying similarities and differences in Japanese and English grammatical rules relating to word order or the use of elements such as pronouns
Identify textual conventions of familiar spoken, written and multimodal types of texts

[Key concepts: text, genre, mode, tenor, audience; Key processes: identifying, sequencing, comparing] (ACLJAU015 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • recognising structures and key features of familiar types of texts such as めいし、 emails, conversations, speeches, advertisements, stories and songs, identifying formulaic expressions and comparing with similar texts in English, for example, by comparing ways of answering the phone or starting and ending a letter
  • identifying how certain types of texts are typically constructed, for example, the use of particular layouts, visual images and grammatical features in advertisements, manga or brochures
  • understanding that the format of Japanese texts can include either たてがき or よこがき、 according to the context, purpose and intended audience
  • understanding how to create textual cohesion, using elements such as paragraphing or conjunctions to sequence and link ideas and to maintain the flow of expression, for example, そして、それから、 でも
  • understanding conventions associated with using げんこうようし、 for example, the size of small characters, the position in the square and the placing of punctuation

Language variation and change

Understand that Japanese language use varies according to the context and situation of the interaction and the relationship between participants

[Key concepts: variation, context, relationship; Key processes: identifying, distinguishing, analysing] (ACLJAU016 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • understanding and explaining variation in language use based on the age, relationship, and level of familiarity between participants, for example, (はは)/お(かあ)さん and 先生(せんせい)/~さん、 avoiding あなた when showing politeness
  • identifying language use associated with gender, age, social status or the purpose of interaction, for example, ぼく、 わたし、 はい、 うん、 こんにちは、 ハロー、 さようなら、 バイバイ、 and recognising the importance of using appropriate forms of address when interacting with different people, for example, using ~くん/~さんwhen communicating with close friends, family members or other young people, and using ~さん、 ~先生(せんせい) for adults
Understand that the Japanese language both influences and is influenced by other languages and cultures

[Key concepts: language change, intercultural contact, loan words; Key processes: identifying, reflecting, making connections] (ACLJAU017 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • recognising words of Japanese origin used in English, for example, ‘judo’, ‘karaoke’, ‘karate’, ‘obento’, ‘sushi’
  • recognising the use of words ‘borrowed’ by Japanese from other languages such as English, French or Portuguese, for example, サッカー、 ゴルフ、 パン、 and noting how these are pronounced by Japanese speakers
  • understanding that languages and cultures change continuously due to contact with one another and in response to new needs, ideas and developments in communications and technology, and considering why some types of words and expressions are more frequently borrowed, such as ラップトップ、 ダウンロード、 チャット
  • identifying words that have similar meanings and pronunciation across different languages, and reflecting on the possible origins of such words and their associated cultures
  • understanding that there are Japanese-speaking communities outside Japan, for example, in the United States, in particular Hawaii, and South America, and that Japanese is widely taught in many countries around the world and within the Asia-Pacific region, including Australia
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • understanding that all languages change, that some are constantly growing and expanding and that others are disappearing or being revived, as in the case of many indigenous languages

Role of language and culture

Explore connections between languages and cultures as exemplified in particular words, expressions and communicative behaviours, noticing how meaning can be culture-specific and difficult to transfer between languages

[Key concepts: culture, language, values, meaning; Key processes: analysing, explaining, comparing] (ACLJAU018 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • considering how Japanese language and interaction patterns around familiar routines such as mealtimes reflect traditional practices and values associated with family life, for example, using formulaic expressions such as いただきます。 いってきます。いってらっしゃい 。ただいま 。おかえり。
  • identifying changes in contemporary communication styles that reflect changes in Japanese and Australian cultures and social practices, for example, ハロー、 バイバイ and グッドラック
  • identifying and explaining phrases that require cultural knowledge in order to be understood in translation, for example, はじめまして。よろしく おねがいします 。or that the question おげんき ですか。is a genuine health enquiry rather than a greeting
  • understanding that the Japanese language has many ways of expressing values such as consideration and respect, for example, どうぞ, >どうも、 すみません、 おくれて すみません、 しつれいします、 and using indirect forms of refusal and softening responses, for example, ちょっと…。あんまり…。

Years 7 and 8 Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 8, students interact with one another and the teacher in classroom routines and activities, exchanging greetings, wishes and information about their personal and social worlds. They use gestures and formulaic expressions appropriately, for example, おくれて すみません。しつれいします。 They comprehend and respond to familiar questions, such asだれ、 (なに)、 どこ、 いつ、 (なん)よう()、 どんな、 and instructions, such as たって ください。三人の グループに なって ください。、 using rehearsed and some spontaneous language. They ask for assistance and clarification, for example, ~は 何 ですか。十四ページ ですね。. They pronounce voiced and unvoiced sounds, long vowels, blends, double consonants and high-frequency loan words with developing rhythm and intonation. They read and write texts in hiragana and katakana, with some kanji for numbers, days of the week and high-frequency nouns, adjectives and verbs, such as人、 先生(せんせい) 日本(にほん) (おお)きい、 (ちい)さい、 (とも)だち、 ()きます、 ()べます. Students identify key points of information in short predictable written, spoken and multimodal texts, understanding descriptions of people, objects, places and activities. They use non-verbal, visual and contextual cues to assist in making meaning. Students use rehearsed language related to their personal world to convey information in both written and spoken texts. They produce short sentences involving nouns, verbs (for example, 何を しますか 。ゲームを します。), common counter classifiers (for example, ~人、 ~ひき、 ~さい), and adjective, noun and verb predicates. They apply correct stroke order to all characters, and use appropriate punctuation and textual features in texts such as captions, greeting cards, profiles, emails or timelines. They structure sentences using correct word order, and link information using conjunctions such as そしてandそれから. They translate and interpret short spoken texts, explaining Japanese gestures and expressions that do not readily translate into English, for example, はじめまして、どうぞよろしく。. They adjust their language to suit different contexts and situations, for example, the use of appropriate titles and forms of address, and respond in culturally appropriate ways to interactions with other Japanese speakers, such as bowing when greeting, and using appropriate eye contact.

Students recognise the nature and roles of the three Japanese scripts, understanding that hiragana represents the basic unit of Japanese sound, kanji represents meaning, and katakana is used for borrowed words. They use the hiragana and katakana chart as a tool when writing and reading, recognising their systematic nature. They know that hiragana and katakana are pronounced identically and that the pronunciation of borrowed words is determined by the Japanese sound system. Students understand and apply grammatical concepts such as the use of particles, for example, の、 へ、 に、 で、 と、 も、 が、 は、 を、 か、 よ、 and conjugation of present, past, positive and negative forms of verbs. They understand and use and adjectives, and apply the rules of counter classifiers such as ~人、~(がつ)、 ~ひき/びき/ぴき. They explain how language and behaviour change according to participants, context and relationship, and that politeness and respect are expressed explicitly in Japanese through greetings, vocabulary, formulaic expressions and actions. They understand that languages and cultures change over time, and provide examples of how languages borrow words from one another. Students make connections and comparisons between elements of the Japanese language and culture and their own, identifying how languages reflect ways of thinking and behaving. They identify how Japanese values such as humility and harmony are reflected in language, such as by deflecting praise, for example, じょうず ですね。

いいえ。、 softening responses with expressions such asちょっと or あんまり、 and using indirect forms of refusal or disagreement.


Years 7 and 8 Work Sample Portfolios