Italian

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Context statement

The place of the Italian language and culture in Australia and the world
Italian, also known as Standard Italian or italiano standard, is the official language of Italy, the Vatican City, San Marino and parts of Switzerland.

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PDF documents

Resources and support materials for the Australian Curriculum: Languages - Italian are available as PDF documents. 
Languages - Italian: Sequence of content
Languages - Italian: Sequence of Achievement - F-10 Sequence
Languages - Italian: Sequence …

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Years 3 and 4

Years 3 and 4 Band Description

The nature of the learners

At this level, children are developing awareness of their social worlds and of their memberships of various groups including the Italian class. They are developing literacy capabilities in English, such as writing in the Roman alphabet, which assists to some degree in learning Italian. They benefit from varied, activity-based learning that builds on their interests and capabilities and makes connections with other areas of learning.

Italian language learning and use

The development of oral proficiency requires rich language input in different modes and from different sources. Children develop active listening skills and respond through action-related talk. They strengthen their comprehension skills, using contextual and grammatical cues as well as phonic and non-verbal cues. The language they encounter is authentic, with modification when necessary, involving familiar vocabulary and simple structures. Children are supported to use the language themselves in familiar contexts and situations, such as exchanging simple ideas and information, negotiating predictable activities and interactions, and participating in shared tasks, performance and play. They continue to build vocabulary which can be adapted for different purposes, and to control simple grammatical forms to communicate in familiar contexts.

Contexts of interaction

The contexts in which learners interact in using and learning Italian are primarily local: the classroom, school, home and community, with some access to wider communities of Italian speakers and resources through virtual and digital technologies.

Texts and resources

Children develop literacy skills and textual knowledge through supported interaction with a range of spoken, written, visual and multimodal texts. Imaginative and interactive texts (such as picture books, stories, puppet plays, songs and games) engage the expressive and cultural dimensions of language. Procedural, informational and descriptive texts (such as negotiated classroom rules, planned activities, and family and class profiles) encourage students to use language to ‘get things done’.

Features of Italian language use

Students experiment with pronunciation and intonation in Italian, noticing similarities and differences with other familiar languages. They focus on structures and grammatical rules such as those relating to the use of possessive pronouns, prepositions and negation. They extend their knowledge of definite and indefinite articles, and of gender and singular/plural forms.

As they encounter Italian language and culture they make comparisons with their own language(s) and culture(s) and consider their own ways of communicating. This leads to exploring concepts of commonality and difference, and of identity, and to thinking about what it means to speak more than one language.

Level of support

Children’s grammatical knowledge and accuracy in spoken and written Italian are developed both through form-focused activities and through opportunities to apply this knowledge in meaningful task activity, as they build their communicative skills, confidence and fluency. Teachers provide models and examples; introduce language, concepts and resources needed to manage and complete tasks; make time for experimentation and drafting; and provide support for self-monitoring and reflection.

The role of English

The use of English, when appropriate, provides support opportunities for discussion and exploration of ideas which help children to build a conceptual frame and metalanguage for talking about language and culture, and about their experiences as learners moving between languages and cultures.


Years 3 and 4 Content Descriptions

Socialising

Interact and socialise with the teacher and peers to exchange personal information and describe people, places, things and everyday routines relating to self, school and home

[Key concepts: routine, home; Key processes: describing, interacting, responding] (ACLITC020 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • exchanging personal information and responding to questions about self, family, leisure, neighbourhood, daily experiences and food, for example, Da dove vieni? Da Torino. Sono italiano, e tu?; Chi sei? Chi è …? Sono …, e tu?; Lui/lei è …, …è mio padre. Questo/a è …, e questo/a? È mio fratello. Dove abiti? Abito in via.../a …, e tu?
  • describing self and friends, for example, Sono biondo/alto/grasso; …è bruno; … è giovane, … ha gli occhi/il naso/la bocca + adjective, for example,Il nonno è simpatico, Ha gli occhi molto grandi
  • describing location, for example, the position of objects in the home (Il vaso è sopra il tavolo; l’albero è a sinistra; l’auto è dentro il garage)
  • describing things and routines, for example, La camicia è rossa/nuova/piccola. A pranzo mangio ..., bevo ...
  • describing time, including days of the week and months, as well as ieri, oggi, domani, ora, dopo; Che ore sono? Sono le … Quando? Venerdì, Alle dieci
Participate in collaborative action in class experiences and activities

[Key concepts: occasion, community; Key processes: describing, inviting] (ACLITC021 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • participating in organising a shared lunch in Italian (for example, Who will bring what? Who will invite parents? Facciamo un dolce. Chi porta lo zucchero? Chi porta le mele?) or a shared performance for assembly or guests, for example, Ti piace? Chi dobbiamo invitare? Facciamo un poster
  • creating invitation cards for a party, performance or class event, for example, Caro…Vieni alla nostra festa/recita/riunione! Il giorno…Alle ore ….Luogo/Presso
  • following procedures and instructions together, for example, recipes such as una macedonia di frutta, or making a model of an Italian garden or piazza
Participate in everyday transactions to obtain goods

[Key concepts: need, desire; Key processes: deciding, negotiating] (ACLITC022 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • writing a shopping list based on resources such as online supermarket catalogues, and doing the shopping in a real or simulated situation
  • requesting goods, for example, Posso avere un gelato? Posso avere il pennarello?
  • participating in a visit to the local market to buy ingredients for making minestrone, or participating in ordering food at the school canteen, for example, Io prendo un panino con il formaggio. E tu, cosa prendi?
Participate in everyday classroom activities by asking permission, requesting help, asking how to say or write something, asking for repetition, praising or complimenting

[Key concepts: collaboration, school life; Key processes: negotiating, discussing, connecting] (ACLITC023 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • asking permission, for example, Posso? Posso prendere/fare/parlare/avere qualcosa? Sì/no. Non è possibile. Non adesso
  • requesting help, for example, Come? Aiuto, per favore
  • asking how to say or write a word, for example, Come si dice …? Come si dice in italiano? Come si scrive …?
  • asking for repetition, for example, Non ho capito, Puὸ ripetere?
  • praising and complimenting, for example, Bravo/a! Ottimo! È bello/molto bello! Esatto!
  • responding to a partner’s questions, for example, Di che colore è la maglia? Qual è il tuo/suo gioco preferito?
  • connecting with and reacting to peer responses, noticing different perspectives

Informing

Obtain and process factual information about people, routines, responsibilities and interests

[Key concepts: routine, events, time; Key processes: identifying, recording, categorising, selecting] (ACLITC024 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • surveying classmates or responding to questionnaires about likes, interests, routines and activities (for example, Ti piace ...? Mi piace/non mi piace. Qual è il tuo libro preferito? Qual è il tuo programma televisivo preferito?), tabulating the results, and presenting information in various forms, such as class profiles, birthday charts or summaries of findings, for example, Dieci bambini giocano a tennis e tre a basket
  • generating questions such as Quanti … A che ora? Dov’ è la festa?
  • reading profiles and other information about children in different cultural contexts, in print and digital form
  • ordering and categorising information, for example, cibi sani e cibi poco sani
  • asking and responding to questions that address information such as participants, characteristics of a person, and dates, times and locations of events of interest to the class, for example, la domenica; il dieci giugno; ha trentasette anni; è alto e forte; è grandissima; ha due ali; abita a Milano
Give factual information about people, objects, places and events in texts supported by graphics or illustrations

[Key concepts: information, fact; Key processes: describing, presenting] (ACLITC025 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • creating texts in oral, print or digital form to provide information about:
    • people, for example, Ha i capelli lunghi e ricci; ha gli occhi neri; fa il farmacista; abita a Napoli;
    • pets and animals, for example, Mi piace … perchè … . Mangia …, Vive …;
    • places, for example, describing pictures and creating brochures of Italian resorts and cities (questa è Firenze; vedo il Ponte Vecchio, il fiume Arno, la cupola. È molto bella!)
    • events, for example, describing a party or school celebration (C’è la Coca-Cola; c’è il regalo e c’è la torta)
  • creating posters to inform others of a special event
  • planning and giving short presentations on topics such as holidays, favourite computer games or favourite playground, using a combination of language and images (for example, photos, illustrations, captions, diagrams) to report information

Creating

Listen to, view and read a range of imaginative texts for children, and discuss messages and impressions

[Key concepts: story, drama, message; Key processes: viewing, reading, predicting, describing, discussing; Key text types: narrative, song, poetry] (ACLITC026 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • experiencing different types of children’s texts (for example, Lo Zecchino d’Oro, video clips on Suonolandia and RAI Junior); appreciating elements of humour and drama, use of sound effects, and facial expressions; and responding to the characters and events depicted in the texts, for example, È strano, È buffo. La storia parla di …, La canzone parla di
  • presenting the Pinocchio and La Pimpa stories and commenting on the characters, discussing reasons and consequences (for example, è disobbediente); writing messages to their favourite character in a story or children’s television program, for example, Mi piace/non mi piace la canzone/il quadro. Il documentario è interessante.
  • sharing feelings and ideas about texts (for example, La storia/canzone parla di …e di … Non mi piace …) and making connections between their own experiences and those of characters and places encountered in creative stories or images
  • experimenting with voice to animate characters and using movement/drama to give expression to events in texts, for example, acting out scenes from a story, taking the role of a character
Create short, simple imaginative texts for different audiences

[Key concepts: character, narrative; Key processes: interacting, creating] (ACLITC027 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • making up rhymes and nonsense phrases in playing with the Italian language
  • creating new versions of well-known songs by substituting the words, for example, Per fare un tavolo could become Per fare un cavolo, ci vuole …
  • making picture storybooks (including digital versions) with captions to share with younger students
  • creating a story based on a set of images (for example, Il papà si alza. Il papà mangia. Il papà parte); matching or sequencing a set of images
  • creating greeting cards, for example, Caro/Cara …; Saluti da …

Translating

Translate texts to compare meanings and share understandings about aspects of Italian language and culture that are different from English

[Key concepts: translation, comparison; Key processes: translating, explaining] (ACLITC028 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • translating words, phrases and captions, and describing how meanings may change across languages
  • explaining the ideas contained in texts to someone unfamiliar with Italian, for example, lunch, alla mensa scolastica; le vacanze estive; la passeggiata
  • becoming familiar with using bilingual dictionaries and online translators
Create simple bilingual texts

[Key concepts: meaning, equivalence; Key processes: comparing, explaining] (ACLITC029 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • creating simple bilingual texts for different purposes and audiences, for example, school/classroom signs, captions for a school event or a class/school display of ‘homes around the world’ or ‘classrooms around the world’
  • exploring meanings between Italian and English using picture dictionaries created for self or younger learners

Reflecting

Compare experiences, noticing how these are influenced by language and culture and how readily they may be expressed in Italian

[Key concept: assumption; Key process: comparing] (ACLITC030 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • reflecting on cultural differences between everyday life in Italy and Australia, for example, asking how their school day would change if they went to primary school in Italy or what they would find interesting about sharing a lunch with an Italian family, and why; and considering what they would tell a visiting Italian child about how their own family celebrates Christmas, and explaining their choices
  • noticing the influence of important events such as religious celebrations on childhood experiences (for example, le lezioni settimanali di catechismo, la Prima Comunione, andare alla Scuola Media) and connecting these to their own experiences
  • recognising similarities in the Italian and Australian schooling systems (for example, la maestra, l’aula, il cortile), and differences (for example, il bidello, la mensa, il giardino, le scale), and noticing that the Italian school day is different for cultural reasons
  • noticing similarities between Australian and Italian cultures in major celebrations like Christmas (l’albero di Natale) and Easter (l’uovo di cioccolata), as well as differences, for example, the presence of il presepe at Christmas, and the presence of la sorpresa dentro all’uovo di cioccolata at Easter
  • noticing how their own language use influences expectations about Italian language use, such as seeing word order as ‘back to front’, for example, la macchina rossa = the red car
  • discussing distinctive social and cultural practices such as celebrations, for example, Santo Stefano, Ferragosto, Carnevale or Pasquetta
  • considering messages in Italian children’s stories and making comparisons with own experiences, for example, Is that the same or different for me? What would I do or say in that particular situation?
  • considering own and others’ cultural assumptions about home, school and leisure, and how these may be different in an Italian context
Express aspects of own identity reflected in various group and community memberships, including their developing bilingual identity

[Key concept: membership; Key process: representing] (ACLITC031 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • describing memberships of a wider network such as a club, country or language-speaking community (including being a learner of Italian), using textual and visual representation
  • using Italian to express aspects of personal identity such as name, nationality, languages spoken, interests, and memberships of teams/groups
  • recognising own special talents and those of others
  • considering their own perspective on personal experiences of Italian language and culture by asking questions such as: Am I familiar with this? Have I experienced something like this? What does this mean for me? Is this similar to or different from my experience? How? In what ways?

Systems of language

Experiment with pronunciation and intonation and use rules of spelling (ACLITU032 - Scootle )
  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • developing pronunciation between sound blends in Italian in comparison to English, for example, sc followed by h or i/e (schiavo, piscine, pesce); letter combinations such as gn in lavagna and gnocchi, and gl in figlio and famiglia
  • learning to recognise the silent h as applicable to the verb avere and for borrowed words, for example, hockey, hotel
  • noticing the differences in intonation between statements, questions, exclamations and commands
  • understanding that an accent may change the meaning of the word, for example, è and e, il papà, il Papa
  • applying punctuation and capitalisation rules when writing, for example, omission of capitals with days of the week and months of the year
Use key grammatical structures to form simple sentences, including the use of possessive pronouns, prepositions, definite and indefinite articles, and gender and singular/plural forms (ACLITU033 - Scootle )
  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • identifying gender, singular and plural in the regular form
  • observing gender in patterns of naming, for example, Paolo/Paola and Alessandro/Alessandra, but that Luca, Andrea and Simone are all male names in Italian
  • using singular and plural, recognising that some singular nouns do not follow the regular masculine/feminine pattern, for example, la mano, il papà
  • using the definite and indefinite articles and understanding how to specify a particular person or object, for example, la mamma, una mamma; il quaderno, un quaderno; l’arancia, un’ arancia
  • using personal pronouns in context, for example, Chi ha finito? Io!
  • learning to conjugate common regular verbs in the present tense, for example, gioco-gioca, mangio-mangiamo
  • expressing negation, for example, voglio/non voglio
  • expressing preferences and reasons for preferences, for example, mi piace ... perché
  • using cardinal numbers to tell the time and for dates and ages; using ordinal numbers such as primo, secondo, etc.
  • using adjectives to describe characteristics or qualities of a person or object, such as nationality, shape and colour (for example, Chiara è italiana), and noticing that they change with gender, for example, la macchina rossa, il libro rosso,
  • using prepositions to indicate location or direction, for example, a casa, a Roma, in città, a sinistra, sopra il tavolo, sotto il banco
  • using possessive adjectives to express ownership, for example, la mia casa, la tua famiglia, il tuo cappello, mia nonna
  • using suffixes to add nuance, for example, -ino (fratellino, piccolino) or -etto (poveretto, casetta)
  • creating simple sentences in the subject–verb–object pattern, and linking ideas using conjunctions such as e and ma
Recognise how grammatical structures are used to form simple texts (ACLITU034 - Scootle )
  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • creating paragraphs for a range of texts, including descriptions, cards, letters or emails
  • recognising how ideas are sequenced in simple texts (for example, prima, dopo), noticing patterns in the organisation of texts, for example, sequence in a narrative
  • noticing some commonalities between particular text types in Italian and English, for example, greeting cards have a front cover with images or photos specific to the occasion, an opening and closing address, and a written message

Language variation and change

Understand that language use varies according to the participants’ age, gender and relationship, and the context of use (ACLITU035 - Scootle )
  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • noticing differences between spoken and written texts
  • choosing appropriate formal and informal language for greetings, farewells and good wishes in social interactions, for example, Ciao Angela/Buongiorno Signora. Come stai?/Come sta? Questo/a è … ti presento ... Piacere!
  • identifying the meaning of conventional expressions used socially in Italian and the different contexts in which they are used, for example, Permesso? — Avanti! Grazie. — Prego; Per favore/per piacere. Buon appetito! A domani!
Understand that languages change with use over time (ACLITU036 - Scootle )
  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • maintaining a record of loan words from English to Italian and from Italian to English, noting how borrowing relates to cultural change, for example, new terms for technologies, or the use of Italian words in English advertisements or English words in Italian advertisements
  • observing language used across generations, such as by noticing differences in words used by grandparents, parents and themselves, and suggesting why these differences occur
Understand that Italian is spoken in a variety of forms within and outside of Italy (ACLITU037 - Scootle )
  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • recognising that Italian is one of the most widely used languages among the many languages spoken in the Australian community
  • recognising that there is the standard language called ‘Italian’ as well as a number of different dialects spoken throughout Italy and the Italian diaspora, and that these may be used in hybrid ways
  • discussing the influence of English words on the Italian language and considering why word borrowing occurs, for example, English words incorporated into Italian (il tennis, i jeans, fare lo shopping, l’email) and Italian words incorporated into English (espresso, bellissimo)
  • identifying cognates, for example, nouns such as cioccolata, cinema, pera, parco and stazione; adjectives such as intelligente and interessante; and verbs such as arrivare, studiare, telefonare and visitare

Role of language and culture

Compare and reflect on different cultural practices and the ways in which language use reflects culture-specific ideas (ACLITU038 - Scootle )
  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • recognising similarities and differences between the meaning of signs and symbols in everyday life, for example, use of Roman numerals, male/female signs, street signs (Senso Unico and Zona Pedonale), currency
  • showing awareness that Italian language carries cultural ideas that have no equivalent in English language and Australian culture, for example, Buon onomastico
  • beginning to develop a metalanguage for talking about language
  • making connections and comparisons between questions and responses among members of the class, noting different perspectives
  • observing the connection between some names and regional and family connections or religion

Years 3 and 4 Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 4, students comprehend a range of spoken, written, and multimodal texts on familiar topics, including home life, friends and classroom activities. They use Italian to communicate and to interact, for example, to exchange greetings and to address people, using appropriate language and pronunciation, and often formulaic expressions. They ask and respond to simple questions, by selecting between alternatives provided, by using short spoken responses which may consist of incomplete or partial Italian phrases and structures, or by using a key word to convey a whole idea. They talk about self, family, people, places, routine, school life and their own interests and preferences, for example, Com’è la tua casa? La mia casa è grande, Ci sono due camere da letto e due bagni. Mi piace la mia camera da letto. They use short sentences, reorganising known language to fit personal responses, for example, Giochi domani?Sì/no/Forse. Students understand short written texts, using visual cues, prediction and questioning to decipher meaning. They recall key ideas and events, recognise meanings, and respond meaningfully. Students create written texts of a few sentences using familiar language and structures.

Students demonstrate an understanding of the fact that language is used differently in different situations and contexts. They know the importance of using appropriate language when interacting in Italian, including informal/formal language, and the use of titles and gestures. They vary their responses and statements by choosing adjectives and adverbs, and by combining sentences. They demonstrate understanding of basic Italian grammatical rules, such as the fact that nouns have masculine or feminine gender and singular and plural forms, and that nouns, adjectives and articles need to agree. They identify similarities and differences in the patterns of Italian language compared to English and other familiar languages. They create texts that show understanding of how ideas are connected and how images support the meaning of texts. They make connections to personal experience when describing characters, events or cultural practices and behaviours encountered in texts. They identify cultural differences in ways of communicating and describe similarities and differences between their own and other cultures.


Years 3 and 4 Work Sample Portfolios