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Context statement

The place of the German language and culture in Australia and in the world
German is an official language of Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Liechtenstein, Belgium, Luxembourg and in South Tyrol in Italy.

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PDF documents

Resources and support materials for the Australian Curriculum: Languages - German are available as PDF documents. 
Languages - German: Sequence of content
Languages - German: Sequence of Achievement - F-10 Sequence
Languages - German: Sequence of …

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Years 7 and 8

Years 7 and 8 Band Description

The nature of the learners

These years represent a transition to secondary school. Students in this sequence bring with them an established capability to interact in different situations, to engage with a variety of texts and to communicate with some assistance about their immediate world and that of German-speaking communities. They have experience in analysing the major features of the language system and in reflecting on the nature of intercultural exchanges in which they are involved.

German language learning and use

German is used for a range of classroom interactions and transactions, and for creating and maintaining a new class dynamic, explaining and practising language forms, reflecting on ways of thinking and learning, and developing cultural understanding. Learners are encouraged to socialise and interact with users of German beyond the classroom. Additional opportunities for interaction in the target language are provided by purposeful and integrated use of digital technologies, including social media and a range of applications. Learners work collaboratively and independently in the target language, exploring different modes and genres of communication with particular reference to their current social, cultural and communicative interests and needs. They pool information, language knowledge and resources to plan, problem-solve, monitor and reflect. They use and adapt modelled and rehearsed language in familiar and unfamiliar contexts, increasingly generating original language. They make cross-curricular connections and explore intercultural experiences and perspectives, such as the notion of a shared understanding.

Contexts of interaction

While the primary context for learning is usually the German language classroom, there may be opportunities for interacting with peers in German-speaking contexts and with other learners of German, such as through the use of technology or relationships with partner schools. Learners may also have some contact with German speakers and cultural events in the local community.

Texts and resources

Learners listen to, read, view and interact with a widening range of texts for a variety of purposes (informative, transactional, imaginative, expressive). They apply learnt processing strategies and language knowledge, drawing on their grammatical and vocabulary knowledge and their understanding of text conventions and patterns to obtain meaning from texts. They make connections between texts and cultural frames, and reflect on aspects of the variability of language, identifying how cultural values and perspectives are embedded in language and how language choices determine how people, issues and circumstances are represented. They plan, create and present more complex and varied imaginative, informative and persuasive texts (shared stories, poetry, songs/raps, blogs, advertisements, reports, journal entries), applying appropriate conventions of text types. They design interactive events and collaborative tasks, and participate in discussions, games and competitions.

Features of German language use

Learners gain more control of grammatical and textual elements such as the case system, prepositions and tenses, using the present perfect (Perfekt) tense of verbs conjugated with haben and sein and the simple past (Imperfekt) tenses. They use German with increasing accuracy and fluency, drafting and editing texts to improve structure and effect and to clarify meaning. Learners build on their cumulative experience of learning languages to analyse the relationship between language and culture more critically. They identify cultural references in texts and consider how language frames and communicates perspectives and values. They make comparisons between their own language(s) and German, and reflect on the complexities involved in moving between languages and cultural systems. They monitor and reflect on their own intercultural experience and capability as second language learners, and identify their own personal and community practices and identities that reflect cultural influence.

Level of support

Particular support is required at this stage of second language learning to manage the transition to post-primary schooling and to encourage continued engagement. Opportunities to review and consolidate prior learning are balanced with provision of engaging and relevant new experiences and connections. Students are supported to develop increasing autonomy as language learners and users, to self-monitor, and to reflect on and adjust language in response to their experience in diverse contexts.

The role of English

While German is used in more extended and elaborated ways at this level, English is used when appropriate to allow for explanation, analysis and reflection in relation to abstract concepts.


Years 7 and 8 Content Descriptions

Socialising

Initiate and participate in interactions with peers and adults to discuss and exchange views and experiences

[Key concepts: neighbourhood, school, leisure; Key processes: discussing, commenting, comparing] (ACLGEC154 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • discussing and giving opinions on various topics such as school life, neighbourhood, entertainment, sport and leisure, for example, Hast du ein Lieblingsfach? Ja, ich mag Deutsch. Wie findest du Mathe? Ich finde Sozi interessant. Und du? Ich wohne gern auf dem Land. Es gibt in der Nähe einen Fluβ und einen Fußballplatz. Leider haben wir kein Kino. Gibt es einen Supermarkt, wo du wohnst?
  • recounting events and describing activities and personal experiences, for example, Gestern Abend hat Karly bei The Voice gewonnen. Hast du sie gesehen? Wir sind in den Ferien zum Strand gefahren.
  • communicating in face-to-face or online guided discussions with peers and German-speaking contacts to seek or share information and ideas about social, cultural and environmental issues, for example, Was recyceln Sie, Herr Meier?
Engage in tasks and transactions that involve negotiation and problem-solving

[Key concepts: exploratory talk, exchange of ideas, task management; Key processes: transacting, negotiating] (ACLGEC155 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • participating in collaborative learning experiences with peers to organise class events such as an excursion to the market or contribution to a local festival, for example, Wir können mit dem Zug oder mit dem Bus zum Markt fahren. Was wollen wir für das Straßenfest organisieren?
  • planning and conducting a group activity such as a live or online Modeschau with a theme, for example, Sommerferien, Wintersport, ‘Damals und heute’
  • agreeing or disagreeing with a suggestion (Gute Idee!; Wozu? Das wäre super/blöd!), and accepting or declining an offer or invitation, for example, Danke für die Einladung, aber ich habe freitagabends Judo. Hast du am Montag Zeit?
  • transacting and negotiating in real or simulated situations, such as shopping or comparing similar offers for goods in online catalogues on German-language internet sites, including commenting on price, for example, Ich möchte diese Hose anprobieren. Haben Sie Größe 38? Das ist sehr preiswert.
  • asking, giving and following directions to real or virtual locations (Wo ist das Schwimmbad? Es ist in der Schillerstraße. Wie komme ich am besten zum Bahnhof? Können Sie mir helfen? Ich suche…), using electronic information devices, apps, street maps or directories
  • complaining about unsatisfactory goods or services, for example, making a phone call about a cancelled concert and asking for a refund or substitute tickets for another event (Ich möchte mich beschweren. Ich möchte mein Geld zurück!)
Interact in classroom activities and discussions through asking and responding to open-ended questions, giving opinions and making suggestions

[Key concepts: interaction, learning strategies, exchange; Key processes: responding, participating, advising] (ACLGEC156 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • initiating interactions in a class or group activity, such as by assigning roles to others, for example, Patrick, du kannst den Text schreiben! Sarah, du machst die Fotos!
  • stating a problem and asking for advice, for example, Ich habe mein Passwort vergessen. Was soll ich machen? Wie lernt man am besten Vokabeln?
  • discussing and sharing learning strategies, for example, Lerne jeden Tag zehn neue Wörter! Ich lerne Vokabeln am besten, wenn ich sie in einem Satz schreibe.
  • participating in classroom activities and discussions to manage shared learning experiences, considering and commenting on the contributions and views of others, for example, Ja, das stimmt.; Sie hat Recht.; Ich bin anderer Meinung.

Informing

Access, summarise and analyse information and opinions from a range of sources relating to topical issues of shared interest

[Key concepts: resources, values, issues; Key processes: summarising, reading, listening, analysing] (ACLGEC157 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • accessing and using print and online resources such as dictionaries, grammar references and encyclopaedias to support understanding of texts
  • analysing and summarising information and viewpoints on a range of issues, such as information from a television news report about social media, a documentary on early German settlement in Australia, or an interview with an older German speaker on the topic of her/his Kindheit und Jugend, using tools such as guided note-taking, timelines and/or concept maps
  • accessing, collating and summarising information on youth-related issues such as Musik, Schulsport or Fernsehen from sources such as the internet, magazines and personal communications
  • collecting information on topics related to lifestyle choices, explaining changes in focus and perspective over different periods, for example, Rauchen oder nicht?
  • researching young people’s lifestyles across German-speaking cultures and contexts, comparing information from different cultural contexts to identify the influence of factors such as geography, climate, and social and community environment, for example, Wintersport, Reiseziele
Convey information and ideas on different topics, issues and events, describing and comparing views, perspectives and experiences, and using modes of presentation to suit different audiences

[Key concepts: representations, perspectives; Key processes: comparing, classifying, organising] (ACLGEC158 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • presenting information and ideas using language appropriate to text type and topics or themes, such as using reflective language in diary and journal entries, persuasive language in advertisements, emotive images and captions to highlight issues such as Kinderrechte, or rap rhythms and punchlines to engage with controversial ideas or provoke reactions
  • contrasting aspects of everyday life past and present, for example, Heute haben wir Twitter und Facebook. Damals gab es nur die Post.
  • organising and presenting information to raise awareness or invite action in relation to social or community issues, using multimodal forms of presentation such as sound and visual images or websites with hyperlinks
  • classifying information obtained from different print and electronic resources in a shared database of categories, themes and genres, showing relationships between ideas, topics and key vocabulary
  • combining modes of presentation such as displays, videos or music to compare social and cultural themes, for example, Australien und Asien/Deutschland und Europa im 21. Jahrhundert

Creating

Respond to a range of imaginative texts by expressing opinions and feelings about key ideas and making connections with personal experiences and other texts

[Key concepts: plot, character, emotions; Key processes: expressing, reviewing, comparing] (ACLGEC159 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • conducting a mock interview with a character from a text such as a short story or episode from a television series, or with a music or movie star, about their experience
  • reviewing a film, computer game, novel or performance for a radio segment or to recommend to a friend
  • comparing Australian and German-language examples of a particular genre for cultural and stylistic differences, for example, iconic television series such as Gute Zeiten, schlechte Zeiten and ‘Home and Away’
  • creating a persuasive text promoting a new television show, book, film or song for a targeted audience, for example, a poster, book or CD cover or social media post for German-speaking peers
  • listening to or viewing digital and other texts, such as songs, raps, or film and video clips, noticing ideas, comparing aspects that may be similar or different across cultures, and making connections with own experiences
Create individual and shared texts about imagined people, places and experiences, to entertain others

[Key concepts: imagination, audience, entertainment; Key processes: composing, performing, experimenting] (ACLGEC160 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • creating the next scene, a new character or an alternative ending for imaginative texts such as a story, drama or film script
  • dramatising a text, for example, performing a poem or imagining they are the ‘characters’ in a painting and creating a scenario and dialogue
  • creating texts to entertain younger audiences, such as an ebook, an alphabet or number book, a puppet play or short film depicting an aspect of contemporary teenage life, considering different cultural perspectives and selecting appropriate language, rhythms and images to enrich the listening or visual experience
  • composing and performing short songs with particular themes or for real or imagined occasions, for example, Liebe, Ferien, Freunde

Translating

Interpret and/or translate for friends or visitors terms associated with German or own culture

[Key concepts: relationship, meaning, idioms; Key processes: interpreting, explaining, translating] (ACLGEC161 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • translating expressions associated with politeness and social protocols in German, for example, responding to requests or thanks, or signing cards (Dein Fritz/Deine Anna), and comparing with typical expressions in similar messages in English
  • translating and discussing common idiomatic expressions in both German and English, for example, Ich drücke dir die Daumen (‘I’ll keep my fingers crossed for you’)
  • comparing and finding equivalent phrases and expressions in German and English, discussing differences and cultural influences, for example, so alt wie ein Baum/Stein (‘as old as the hills’), einen Bärenhunger haben (‘to be as hungry as a horse’)
  • explaining terms associated with practices or features of schools in German-speaking countries, such as hitzefrei or aspects of assessment and reporting, for example, das Notensystem, die mündliche Note, der blaue Brief, sitzenbleiben, and drawing comparisons with similar terms used in Australian schools
Create bilingual resources such as games, vocabulary cards, glossaries, word lists and labelled posters for language learning and the wider community

[Key concepts: representation, organisation; Key processes: selecting, categorising, evaluating, translating] (ACLGEC162 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • creating English captions, commentaries or subtitles for German multimodal texts, or vice versa
  • discussing problems associated with online translators by comparing different versions of translations and suggesting causes for differences and mistranslations, considering the need to go beyond literal meaning
  • creating vocabulary lists and annotated cultural explanations for German-speaking visitors to events such as Australian sports days, swimming carnivals or family events, explaining culture-specific elements

Reflecting

Participate in intercultural experiences, demonstrating awareness of the importance of shared understanding, and reflecting on adjustments made as a result of reactions and responses

[Key concepts: values, society, reaction; Key processes: adjusting, evaluating, reflecting] (ACLGEC163 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • participating in cultural experiences, such as eating at a Swiss restaurant/café in Australia, watching a German soccer match or Austrian skiing competition, or listening to a pop group performance on Radio Liechtenstein, and reflecting on cultural similarities and differences that are manifested through language
  • reflecting on how some personal or community ideas and actions in the Australian context may be perceived by German speakers, for example, being able to go camping all year round or taking into account the vastness of Australia when planning a holiday, and discussing possible implications
  • observing and recording aspects of language (such as register and use of the imperative) and cultural behaviour that need to be modified when communicating in German, depending on audience and social context
  • reflecting on and explaining which aspects of culture and language use can be comfortably adopted and where adjustments should be made, such as the use of Sie and titles (Herr Dr. Meier), wearing of Hausschuhe, placing payment and receiving change on a tray rather than in the hand in a shop
  • providing advice for others in intercultural situations where it is difficult to make oneself understood clearly or to understand the other speaker
Consider how personal experiences, family origins, traditions and beliefs impact on identity and shape intercultural experiences

[Key concepts: perspective, values, membership; Key processes: reflecting, connecting, discussing] (ACLGEC164 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • mapping their own linguistic and cultural profile, for example, by creating a chart, timeline or web profile to highlight formative elements such as family languages, key relationships and intercultural experiences
  • reflecting on the experience of learning and using German, considering how it might add a further dimension to own sense of identity
  • discussing how they would represent Australia in a cultural forum, for example, what they would wear or take along to an International Students Day function held in Austria
  • discussing in English the issue of identity and gender-inclusive language in German, for example, Schüler; Schüler und Schülerinnen; SchülerInnen

Systems of language

Recognise the pronunciation of loan words, and understand and apply knowledge of similarities and differences between German and English punctuation

[Key concepts: pronunciation, punctuation, systems; Key processes: comparing, making connections, noticing] (ACLGEU165 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • exploring the German pronunciation of a range of loan words from English and other languages, for example, Job, Restaurant, Pizza
  • recognising the role of and relationship between pronunciation, rhythm and pace in creating effects in spoken texts such as stories, poems, songs and conversations
  • comparing punctuation rules in English and German, considering aspects such as the distribution and functions of commas, the style of quotation marks for direct speech, and writing numbers less than one million as one word
  • applying German punctuation and spelling rules to own writing and learning to systematically edit own and others’ written work
Extend knowledge of elements of the German grammatical system, including prepositions, reflexive verbs, adverbial phrases and subordinating conjunctions, to specify and describe people, objects and places, sequence events and qualify opinions

[Key concepts: syntax, systems, verb tenses, grammar patterns; Key processes: noticing, selecting, linking] (ACLGEU166 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • specifying a person, object or place using knowledge of the German case system (nominative, accusative and dative), and using definite and indefinite articles, kein, personal pronouns (including man), and possessive, demonstrative and interrogative adjectives such as sein, unser, dieser, jeder and welcher
  • noticing the relationship between gender, article and case and the adjectival ending when describing people, objects, places and events, for example, Mein bester Freund hat lange, schwarze Haare und trägt einen kleinen Ohrring.; Es gibt hier keinen Sportplatz.
  • selecting and using the appropriate form of ‘you’ (du, ihr, Sie) and its possessive adjective equivalents (dein, euer, Ihr) according to the audience, for example, Sind Sie Frau Wagner?; Hast du dein Geld mit?
  • selecting the correct personal pronoun for ‘it’ (er/sie/es; ihn) for objects, for example, Woher hast du den Hut? Er ist sehr schön; Ich habe ihn bei … gekauft.
  • comparing the meanings and use of the German modal verbs with their English equivalents, for example, Wir müssen eine Schuluniform tragen. Man darf hier nicht essen.
  • noticing that some verbs can be combined with a separable or inseparable prefix which alters the meaning of the base verb, for example, Er kommt um 17.15 Uhr.; Kommst du mit?; Ich bekomme manchmal Geld zum Geburtstag.
  • describing current, recurring and future actions using regular, irregular, modal, separable and inseparable verbs in the present tense, for example, Wir spielen morgen nicht mit., Er sieht viel fern. Ich muss meine Hausaufgaben machen. Nächstes Jahr bekommen wir neue Laptops.
  • describing past events and experiences in present perfect and/or simple past tense using a limited range of common verbs, for example, Ich habe meine Hausaufgaben nicht gemacht, denn ich war am Wochenende krank.
  • using reflexive verbs in present tense with their appropriate accusative reflexive pronouns to describe daily routines and express emotions and interests, for example, Ich dusche mich morgens. Interessierst du dich für Geschichte? Wir freuen uns auf die Ferien.
  • understanding and applying the ‘verb as second element’ (Wir kommen morgen or Morgen kommen wir) and ‘subject-time-object-manner-place’ (STOMP) word order rules for main clauses (Ich spiele jetzt Basketball.), and realising that German word order is flexible, allowing other elements apart from the subject to begin the sentence, for example, Langsam verstehe ich mehr Deutsch. Zu Hause ist es oft sehr laut.
  • linking and sequencing events and ideas using a range of cohesive devices, including adverbs (danach, vorher, dann, früher) and common conjunctions (als, dass, obwohl, wenn, weil), usually with the subordinate clause after the main clause
  • expressing opinions using, for example, meiner Meinung nach; Ich glaube, dass … Wir sind dagegen/dafür
  • understanding and using wozu? to clarify purpose
  • understanding and using dative and accusative prepositions with their core meanings, for example, Ich komme aus der Stadt. Der Kuchen ist für dich.
  • describing destinations using prepositions including some ‘two-way’ prepositions (Wechselpräpositionen), for example, Wir fahren nach Adelaide. Der Junge geht zum Bahnhof. Sie sind in die Stadt gefahren.
  • experimenting (using models) with different structures to make comparisons, for example, Englisch ist schwieriger als Mathe. Welches Auto ist am sichersten? Kaffee ist nicht so gesund wie Wasser
  • referring to quantities of people and things using cardinal numbers up to a billion, for example, Deutschland hat 81,9 Millionen Einwohner.
  • extending metalanguage to communicate in German and English, for example, about case, word order and verb tenses (Dativ, Wechselpräpositionen, das Imperfekt, Hilfsverben, trennbare Verben)
Understand the structures and conventions associated with different types of personal, informative and persuasive texts such as emails, news items and advertisements

[Key concepts: structure, conventions, purpose; Key processes: analysing, applying, describing] (ACLGEU167 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • applying knowledge of text types and their purposes to identify the gist and predict the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary in texts
  • analysing different samples of a particular text type such as advertisements to determine the targeted audience(s), and describing the techniques used
  • identifying the structure and conventions of a range of texts, such as a diary entry, a weather report and a news report
  • describing relationships between language, structure and textual purpose, for example, in a personal text using informal register, such as a thank-you email to a friend (Liebe Grüße; du; Dein(e) X)

Language variation and change

Identify features of German that vary according to audience, context and purpose in familiar spoken and written texts

[Key concepts: register, variation; Key processes: identifying, comparing, analysing] (ACLGEU168 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • identifying differences in register and style when using language in different contexts, for example, language in songs and graffiti, and teacher feedback on a test or in a formal school report
  • comparing German and English language use in similar situations and in texts with similar content such as advertisements, or student blogs about school issues
  • understanding particular functions of speech such as making a request or expressing pleasure or dissatisfaction, and considering how it is realised with different speakers (strangers, acquaintances, friends, family members), and possible consequences, including compliance, giving offence or being accepted into a group
  • recognising that different situations require different levels of politeness depending on the context and speaker, such as thanking a host parent or a peer for a gift or apologising to a teacher or a family member for being late
  • understanding that texts have different purposes (to persuade, to entertain), different audiences (children, adolescents, German speakers, Australians) and different forms (short speech, blog)
  • recognising textual conventions popular with young German speakers, such as the use of contractions, abbreviations and acronyms in text messages, for example, 4u = für dich = for you, brb = bin gleich wieder da = be right back, 8ung = Achtung!, dubido = du bist doof, sz = schreib zurück, sTn = schöner Tag noch
Understand that German, like other languages, continues to change over time due to influences such as globalisation and new technologies and knowledge

[Key concepts: change, globalisation, evolution; Key processes: investigating, analysing, understanding] (ACLGEU169 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • investigating and reporting on evidence of current and historical influence of German language and culture in the local and broader Australian community, for example, German/Austrian/Swiss place names (Heidelberg, Hahndorf, Leichhardt, Grindelwald), food (restaurants, bakeries, market stalls), festivals and celebrations (German Film Festival, Swiss Festival, Weihnachtsmarkt), and organisations (Goethe-Institut, SBS German Radio, clubs, churches, companies)
  • understanding that German, like all languages, is constantly expanding to include new words and expressions in response to changing environments due to globalisation, technology, language shifts and exchange, and intercultural experiences, for example, googeln, skypen
  • understanding that English grammar used to be more similar to German grammar but that English has changed, for example, the Old English ‘What thinkest thou?’ and Was denkst du?
  • noting that although German grammar has not changed as much as English over the centuries, it did relatively recently undergo changes in spelling and punctuation in the official Rechtschreibreform, requiring, for example, β to be used only after long vowel sounds or diphthongs (Fuβball, Spaβ, weiβ), and ss to be used after short vowels (dass, Klasse)

Role of language and culture

Reflect on different aspects of the cultural dimension of learning and using German

[Key concepts: cultural attitudes and values, assumptions; Key processes: recognising, discussing, analysing] (ACLGEU170 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • recognising that different expressions are used across cultures to communicate ideas, for example, when describing Brot or school excursions (Klassenfahrt, Wandertag)
  • exploring how origin, geography and religion are integrally connected with lifestyle, daily practices and language use, for example, Recycling, Kaffee und Kuchen, Wandern, Stehcafé, religious/public holidays, choice of Fremdsprachen offered in schools
    • Sustainability
  • discussing the use of appropriate gestures and body language when communicating in German, for example, not putting hands in pockets while talking with someone (as this may be considered rude), and maintaining eye contact
  • identifying changes in own ways of thinking about culture and identity as a result of learning German

Years 7 and 8 Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 8, students use written and spoken German to interact with teachers, peers and others; to make decisions, solve problems and negotiate transactions; and to exchange and justify ideas, opinions and views. When interacting, they use both rehearsed and spontaneous language to ask and respond to open-ended questions and express, compare and justify opinions, for example, Sie glaubt, dass … Ich bin dafür, weil … They apply rules of pronunciation, rhythm, stress and intonation to a range of sentence types and words, including loan words from English. They obtain, summarise and evaluate information from a range of sources. They express opinions and feelings in response to imaginative texts, and make connections with their own experiences and other texts. They plan, draft and present original imaginative and informative texts, following models to link and sequence events and ideas using both adverbs such as danach, dann, früher, vorher and common subordinating conjunctions, for example, als, wenn, weil, dass. They use some modal verbs and imperative forms, for example, Was soll ich machen? Du kannst … Kauf die neue App! They refer to a person, object or place using definite and indefinite articles, personal pronouns, and some demonstrative and interrogative adjectives such as dieser, jeder and welcher. They produce original present tense sentences and use familiar examples of the Perfekt and Imperfekt tenses. They use a range of everyday and topic-based prepositions, adverbs and adverbial phrases, for example, nach der Schule, zu Hause, in der Stadt, gegen die Wand, links, hier, oben, im Süden. They interpret and/or translate terms associated with the culture of German-speaking communities or their own culture, and explain specific values and traditions reflected in the language. They create a range of bilingual resources for the wide community and to assist their own and others’ language learning. They explain the importance of shared understanding, discussing adjustments made as a result of reactions and responses to intercultural experience.

Students explain how language changes over time and identify reasons for change. They identify and apply the German case system (nominative, accusative and dative) and name some grammatical terms and their functions. They describe the similarities and differences between German and English punctuation, including capitalisation, numbers (ordinals, decimals) and quotation marks. They explain reasons for differences in a range of text types, for example, personal, informative and persuasive texts, including differences in text structure and language features. They give examples of how language use varies according to audience, context and purpose. They identify different aspects of the cultural dimension of learning and using German, and explain how language use reflects cultural ideas, assumptions and perspectives.


Years 7 and 8 Work Sample Portfolios