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Context statement

The place of the German language and culture in Australia and in the world
German is an official language of Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Liechtenstein, Belgium, Luxembourg and in South Tyrol in Italy.

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PDF documents

Resources and support materials for the Australian Curriculum: Languages - German are available as PDF documents. 
Languages - German: Sequence of content
Languages - German: Sequence of Achievement - F-10 Sequence
Languages - German: Sequence of …

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Years 5 and 6

Years 5 and 6 Band Description

The nature of the learners

At this level, students are expanding their social networks, experiences and communication repertoire in both their first language and German. They continue to need guidance and participate in structured, collaborative tasks that both recycle and extend language. They are gaining greater independence and becoming more conscious of their peers and social context, and of the world around them. They are noticing additional similarities and differences between German language and culture and their own.

German language learning and use

Learners use German with one another and the teacher for an increasing range of purposes: exchanging information, expressing ideas and feelings, and functioning within a German learning environment. They are able to work increasingly independently, but enjoy working collaboratively as well as competing with one another. Learners’ ability to communicate within familiar contexts is developing in terms of fluency and accuracy. Their pronunciation, intonation and phrasing are more confident, and they control and access wider vocabulary resources and use an increasing range of strategies to negotiate meaning. Shared tasks develop social, cognitive and language skills, and provide a context for purposeful language experience and experimentation. Focused attention to language structures and systems, literacy skills development, and exploration of cultural elements of communication are conducted at least in part in German. Learners use digital technologies to support their learning in increasingly independent and intentional ways, such as exchanging resources and information with one another and with young people of the same age in German-speaking communities, accessing music and media resources, maintaining blogs and other web pages, creating presentations, and participating in social networks.

Oracy development at this level includes active listening to a range of input from different sources and building more elaborated conversational and interactional skills. This involves turn-taking, ‘reading’ language for cultural and contextual meaning, building on others’ contributions, and making appropriate responses and adjustments. Learners begin to engage in debate and discussion. Individual and group oral presentation and performance skills are developed through researching and organising information; structuring, rehearsing and resourcing the content of presentations; and selecting appropriate language to engage particular audiences.

Contexts of interaction

The contexts in which learners interact in learning and using German are sometimes extended beyond the classroom, school, home and community as they have some access to German speakers and cultural resources in wider contexts and communities such as through the use of digital technologies.

Texts and resources

Literacy development involves increasingly independent engagement with a wider range of texts. Learners use a range of cues and decoding strategies to assist comprehension. They make connections between ideas, contexts and language within and between texts. Learners are able to provide simple summaries of and responses to texts. They begin to produce clearly structured original texts for different audiences and purposes. With support they are able to edit their own written work for common grammatical and orthographic errors.

Features of German language use

Learners increase their range of German vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammar and textual knowledge. They use present tense forms of regular
and irregular verbs, including some modal verbs and common separable verbs, and use plural forms of nouns and possessive adjectives. They add detail and expand simple sentences by using adverbs, phrases and some conjunctions. They move between statement, question and imperative forms and use simple negative constructions. They develop metalanguage to comment on grammar and vocabulary. As they use German to interact in different situations and to engage with different resources, learners develop an understanding of how language and culture influence each other. They learn to recognise how language features and expressions reflect cultural values and experiences, for example, language variation relating to age, gender, and relationship between participants, and how grammatical forms or vocabulary choices can affect the ‘meaning’ that is made, for example, using informal or formal forms of address, or using adjectives expressing approval or disapproval. This leads to considering their own ways of communicating and using language, and to thinking about the construction of personal identity and the notion of multiple identities.

Level of support

While learners work more independently at this level, ongoing and systematic scaffolding, feedback and review support the interactive process of learning. Modelling and scaffolding are incorporated into task activity. Support materials include models, stimulus materials, and resources such as word charts, vocabulary lists, dictionaries and electronic reference resources.

The role of English

While the use of German in the classroom increases at this level, the use of English for discussion, reflection and explanation ensures the continued development of learners’ awareness of the nature and function of language generally as well as of their own emerging intercultural capability. Using both German and English in the classroom develops a sense of what it means to be bilingual.


Years 5 and 6 Content Descriptions

Socialising

Interact using descriptive and expressive language to share information about daily life, relate experiences and express feelings

[Key concepts: school, home, routines, relationships; Key processes: listening, describing] (ACLGEC137 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • exchanging information with peers and adults (online, in writing or face-to-face) about daily routines and leisure activities, using modelled language associated with time, sequence and location, for example, Ich stehe um 7.30 Uhr auf. Dann frühstücke ich. Ich schwimme und surfe oft.
  • expressing feelings (Wie geht’s? Es geht mir nicht gut. Ich bin krank.) using adjectives (aufgeregt, glücklich, nervös, sauer, traurig)
  • using communication strategies such as active listening skills, turn-taking cues, and requests for clarification or more detail to support interaction, for example, Und du, was meinst du? Stimmt das? Warum?
  • describing key friends or family members, using simple descriptive and expressive modelled language, for example, Das ist mein Bruder. Er ist sehr sportlich und intelligent. Er spielt sehr gern Fuβball und liest gern Comics. Ich liebe meinen Bruder.
  • recounting social and cultural experiences with family and friends, for example, Wir haben eine Reise nach Neuseeland gemacht. Unser Campingplatz war direkt am See und wir sind jeden Tag geschwommen.
  • apologising and expressing concern or sympathy to friends and family members, for example, Tut mir Leid. Schade! Du Arme(r)!
Participate in guided tasks such as planning and organising events and completing transactions

[Key concepts: collaboration, organisation, responsibility; Key processes: organising, planning, budgeting] (ACLGEC138 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • organising and conducting collaborative activities, for example, a Deutsch macht fit session for a younger class, or designing badges or bilingual posters on healthy eating or recycling (Trinkt lieber Wasser!; Recycelt eure Dosen!)
  • participating in real or simulated transactions such as buying food, for example, Ich nehme ein Käsebrötchen. Was kostet ein Eis? Das macht 6,50 Euro.
  • participating in sourcing goods and services, such as budgeting for virtual shopping expeditions, consulting online catalogues and websites, comparing prices and value, and discussing intended purchases, for example, Dieses Handy ist zu teuer. Der Hut passt dir gut.
  • exchanging and comparing currencies, for example, converting Euro or Schweizer Franken into Australian dollars
Use simple questions, statements and responses to participate in and support classroom interactions and learning activities, and to indicate understanding and monitor own learning

[Key concepts: process, progress, outcome; Key processes: discussing, monitoring, reflecting] (ACLGEC139 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • politely asking peers to do something and responding to requests, for example, giving and receiving things (Gib mir itte den Stift! bitte schön; danke schön)
  • discussing and creating shared class rules and procedures, for example, Dürfen wir auf dem Boden sitzen? Wir müssen immer aufpassen.
  • checking on progress during learning tasks or activities, using comments and questions such as Kein Problem! Das schaffen wir. Was machst du jetzt? Verstehst du das?
  • sharing ideas about the experience of learning and using German, and comparing what they can and cannot do, for example, Ich kann gut sprechen, aber ich finde das Lesen und Schreiben schwierig.

Informing

Gather, compare and respond to information from different sources relating to social and natural worlds

[Key concepts: environment, lifestyles, relationships; Key processes: researching, collating, reading, viewing] (ACLGEC140 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • collecting and comparing information from a range of informative print media and digital texts on topics related to social and environmental issues, for example, family life, schooling in different cultural contexts, endangered animals, or innovative technology
  • obtaining information from simple texts such as advertisements or features in teen magazines to share impressions of the lifestyles of young German speakers in different contexts
  • viewing subtitled video clips on different German-speaking communities, identifying key facts and features, and recording new vocabulary and expressions for use in shared texts
  • compiling information from a survey of peers and adults on social behaviours and reporting on results, for example, mode of transport to school/work (zu Fuβ, mit dem Rad/Bus/Auto) and how environmentally friendly it is, or preferred modes of communication (Hast du ein Handy? Wie oft telefonierst/simst du? Wie oft schaust du einen YouTube clip an?)
    • Sustainability
  • viewing a news item or short documentary about a festival in a German-speaking country, such as die Basler Fasnacht or Karneval in Köln, describing and giving an opinion on the main aspects, for example, Ich finde die Fasnacht in Basel super. Ich mag die Masken und die Musik. Aber ich möchte nicht um 4 Uhr aufstehen.
Convey information and opinions in different formats to suit specific audiences and purposes, selecting appropriate print and multimodal elements

[Key concepts: youth issues, audience; Key processes: representing, transposing, comparing] (ACLGEC141 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • analysing and presenting the results of a class survey, for example, by creating a poster or digital presentation using graphs showing what foods students buy and/or would like to be able to buy at the school canteen (27 Schüler kaufen Süßigkeiten. 34 Schüler wollen andere Getränke.)
  • writing a blog entry for a youth website discussing an aspect of social behaviour, for example, Partys
  • creating a website for a contact group of German-speaking students, posting information on own interests and experiences, for example, Ferien, Freunde, Freizeit, Schule, Medien, and highlighting elements which may be unfamiliar to the intended audience using sound, visuals or graphics
  • creating a factual self-profile using Voki or VoiceThread for a group of young German speakers
  • recording, comparing and representing statistics related to German-speaking countries and Australia, for example, population and physical size, daily temperatures, number and type of dwellings, pet ownership, most popular leisure activities

Creating

Share and compare responses to characters, events and ideas in imaginative texts, making connections with own experience and feelings

[Key concepts: plot, mood, character; Key processes: recounting, describing, sequencing] (ACLGEC142 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • producing a timeline of the main events of an imaginative text or creating a sociogram illustrating how the main character links with other characters
  • responding to a text such as a poem by selecting an appropriate image to illustrate an aspect (message, mood) and explaining choice, for example, Das ist die Sonne. Die Sonne ist heiß und gelb. Die Sonne scheint im Sommer. Ich bin glücklich, wenn die Sonne scheint.
  • using modelled structures such as Das Ende war lustig/traurig/blöd or Die Hauptperson war sehr mutig/schön/schlau to express a personal opinion on aspects of a text, such as the beginning, ending, plot and characters
  • creating storyboards to represent key events in different types of imaginative texts, including captions or word bubbles to capture moods or feelings, for example, using a digital cartoon tool
Present, reinterpret or create alternative versions of imaginative texts, adapting events, characters or settings

[Key concepts: imagination, adaptation, character, setting; Key processes: imagining, creating, interpreting] (ACLGEC143 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • creating and performing a new version of a familiar song or poem, for example, using digital tools and apps for movie making and voice recording
  • creating dialogue/lines for characters from a text, describing in spoken or written form their opinions and emotional responses, for example, as an interview, email or diary entry
  • creating and presenting an adapted text such as a story, for example, by introducing new elements (changing the gender of the main character or the setting, adding a new character or dilemma), and presenting it to a younger audience

Translating

Explain aspects of German language and culture for family or peers, noticing that there are not always equivalent expressions in English

[Key concepts: equivalence, meaning; Key processes: interpreting, explaining, predicting] (ACLGEC144 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • identifying when literal translation is or is not possible, for example, in idiomatic expressions such as Bist du satt? (not voll) or Es geht mir gut. (not Ich bin)
  • using German–English cognates to predict meaning, for example, Brot/‘bread’, kalt/‘cold’, Maske/‘mask’, trinken/‘to drink’
  • recognising long compound words, collecting and analysing interesting examples (das Schlagzeug, babyleicht, abenteuerlustig), and discussing how best to translate them into English
  • explaining in English the use and meaning of German expressions such as Gesundheit, Hals und Beinbruch, Toi, toi, toi!
Create a range of bilingual texts such as notices, announcements, photo stories, dialogues and instructions for language learning and the school community

[Key concepts: bilingualism, meaning; Key processes: translating, selecting, connecting] (ACLGEC145 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • creating and using bilingual resources for language learning, such as glossaries or personal German–English and English–German print and digital word lists and dictionaries with examples and explanations of parts of speech and language use
  • creating bilingual texts for the school community, such as a virtual tour for a school website, or a translation of the school canteen menu into German
  • creating bilingual/multilingual texts for specific audiences, for example, a Big Book or game for young learners of German, or invitations, posters, programs or menus for a class event, performance or celebration, such as a Deutschabend or Maskenfest

Reflecting

Engage in intercultural interactions, describing aspects of language and culture that are unfamiliar or uncomfortable, and discussing own reactions and adjustments

[Key concepts: language, culture, reaction; Key processes: observing, evaluating, reflecting] (ACLGEC146 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • observing how language use reflects politeness and the closeness of social relationships, such as different levels of formality through the use of du/ihr/Sie, and familiarity with friends, for example, nicknames (Spitznamen) and various uses of diminutives (-chen, -lein)
  • noticing the use of and evaluating whether or not to adopt German expressions such as exclamations (Ach so! Echt!), and gestures such as indicating approval with ‘thumbs up’ (comparing with the use of one thumb to indicate the number ‘one’) and ‘applauding’ by rapping knuckles on the table
  • reflecting on how own cultural etiquette and behaviour such as gestures affect interactions and may be interpreted, for example, noticing similarities and differences in body language when interacting with people from German-speaking countries (shrugging, nodding one’s head)
  • noticing own reaction (level of comfort/discomfort) to different cultural practices such as asking Wie geht’s? and not expecting a detailed response about health and current medical conditions
  • recognising aspects of own language use that reflect own cultural perspective and experiences, for example, references to climate and environment, animals, activities and routines such as chores, and celebrations and events
Reflect on aspects of own identity and language use, commenting on and suggesting reasons for what is similar/different and easy/difficult

[Key concepts: reflection, perception; Key processes: reflecting, analysing, comparing] (ACLGEC147 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • participating in a discussion in English about the impact of a school uniform on personal identity, and imagining how German students might view wearing a school uniform
  • preparing a digital ‘language passport’ documenting different stages in learning German, intercultural experiences and reflections on the impact of learning German on self and others, and considering possible reasons for perceived similarities and differences between experiences or degree of difficulty
  • evaluating own preferred learning style, identifying own strengths, and contributing to a class list of German Fachleute/Experten for others to consult for advice, in areas such as Aussprache, Technologie and Vokabeln
  • exploring the idea of stereotypes associated with languages and identity discussing how groups of people tend to think about themselves and others, and how stereotypes affect attitudes and communication and can be inaccurate
  • comparing own ways of using language with those of peers, considering how family and community shape identity and communication, for example, using more than one language, expressing feelings or celebrating in various ways
  • considering whether learning and using German impacts on identity either in or out of the classroom

Systems of language

Explain and apply basic rules for German pronunciation, intonation, spelling and punctuation

[Key concepts: pronunciation, writing systems, punctuation; Key processes: spelling, making connections, applying rules] (ACLGEU148 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • applying basic pronunciation rules, such as the two different pronunciations of ch
  • applying different intonation for statements, questions, exclamations and instructions
  • understanding that β can only be used in lower case, otherwise SS, and that ä, ö and ü can be written as ae, oe and ue respectively, for example, in upper case signs or word puzzles such as crosswords
  • applying phonic and grammatical knowledge to spell and write unfamiliar words containing, for example, ch, j, w and z, and diphthongs such as au, ei, eu and ie
  • noticing distinctive punctuation features of personal correspondence in German, such as Hallo Annette!/Lieber Klaus, followed respectively by upper or lower case for the beginning of the first sentence
  • understanding and applying punctuation rules (full stops, question marks, exclamation marks, commas, quotation marks) in German, including the meaning and use of full stops and commas in ordinal and decimal numbers (die 3. Klasse and 9,50 Euro), and capitalisation rules
Develop and apply knowledge of German grammatical elements such as verb tenses, modal verbs and case, combining them with an increasing range of nouns, adjectives and adverbs to construct sentences

[Key concepts: verb tenses and forms, variation, metalanguage; Key processes: applying, noticing patterns, understanding] (ACLGEU149 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • referring to a person, place or object using the nominative and accusative definite and indefinite articles, for example, Das Mädchen hat einen Hockeyschläger. Der Film hat ein Happy End.
  • noticing how articles and pronouns change after certain verbs (Ich danke dir.) and after particular prepositions associated with location, for example, Wir sind in der Stadt. Die Party ist bei Stefan im Garten.
  • understanding and describing current, recurring and future actions, including by using common separable verbs such as aufstehen, ausgehen, aussehen, fernsehen, mitkommen and mitnehmen
  • understanding the concept of regular and irregular verbs and noticing that this is a feature of both German and English (and other languages, such as French, Italian and Spanish)
  • understanding and expressing obligation and permission using the modal verbs müssen and dürfen, such as in descriptions of school rules, for example, Wir dürfen in der Klasse nicht texten. Wir müssen eine Uniform tragen.
  • comparing the meaning of the modal verbs wollen, sollen, mögen and können with their English equivalents
  • making comparisons using simple structures such as Ich mag Erdbeeren lieber als Kiwis. Radfahren ist besser als Autofahren.
  • giving instructions to one or more peers, for example, Trink(t) mehr Wasser!
  • understanding and speaking about past events by adapting modelled sentences in the present perfect tense and using knowledge of common verbs in the simple past tense, for example, Ich habe heute meine Hausaufgaben nicht gemacht. Wir sind nach Bali geflogen. Früher konnte ich Klavier spielen.
  • noticing that some verbs can be combined with a separable or inseparable prefix which alters the meaning of the base verb, for example, Er kommt um 17.15 Uhr. Kommst du mit? Ich bekomme $50 zum Geburtstag.
  • describing frequency using adverbs and adverbial expressions such as oft, manchmal, jeden Tag, ab und zu and nie
  • understanding the meaning of the conjunctions dass and weil
  • understanding questions using warum and responding with a simple sentence, for example, Warum bist du müde? Ich habe heute Fuβball gespielt.
  • referring to a date, including the year, for an event such as a birth date, for example, Meine Oma ist am elften April 1956 geboren.
  • understanding and locating events in time, including the use of the 24-hour clock, prepositions such as nach and vor, and formulaic expressions such as früher, später, am Wochenende, in den Ferien
  • referring to quantities of people and things (including Meter, Kilometer; Quadratmeter, Quadratkilometer for length/height/distance and area) using cardinal numbers up to 10 000 including decimals, common fractions and negative numbers, for example, 85,5 Prozent haben ein Handy. Die Tagestemperatur liegt bei minus 8 Grad. Ich habe eine Halbschwester.
  • building metalanguage to comment on grammar and vocabulary (for example, Substantive/Nomen, Verben, Ordinalzahlen, Präpositionen, Fragewörter, groβ/klein schreiben), comparing with equivalent English terms
Recognise that different types of texts, such as narratives, recounts and informative and procedural texts, have certain conventions and can take different forms depending on the context in which they are produced

[Key concepts: context, audience, functionality; Key processes: identifying, classifying, transforming] (ACLGEU150 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • identifying the purpose, context and intended audience of a range of familiar texts, for example, fairy tales, sports reports or recipes
  • reading, viewing and/or listening to different digital and other texts with a common topic and discussing structural and linguistic similarities and differences, for example, comparing a print, radio, TV and social media announcement for the same event
  • describing key features of different text types, for example, a shopping list serves as a reminder to self and consists of items and quantities (6 Brötchen, 500 g Butter, Marmelade), whereas a shopping transaction involves interaction and negotiation and more extended language (Ich möchte eine Bratwurst mit Pommes, bitte. Noch etwas? Das macht 5,80 Euro bitte.)
  • transforming a text such as a poem into another text type, such as a conversation, cartoon or SMS

Language variation and change

Recognise that there are variations in German as it is used in different contexts by different people, such as formal/informal register and regional variations

[Key concepts: variation, place, identity; Key processes: observing, comparing, analysing] (ACLGEU151 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • using the plural informal ihr when addressing more than one person, for example, Was meint ihr? Hört gut zu!
  • noticing when the more polite Sie is used, for example, by children to unknown adults
  • recognising that there are differences in what people say when answering the family landline or their own mobile phone, for example, Schmidt, Guten Tag! or Hallo Lisa!
  • being aware of some regional variations in German language use, for example, in greetings such as the Swiss Grüezi and Austrian Servus, or the lack of the Eszett in Switzerland
  • comparing diversity in accents, dialects and vocabulary in German-speaking communities with similar diversity in the use of English within and beyond Australia
Understand why language is important and recognise that languages and cultures change over time and influence one another

[Key concepts: change, borrowing, impact; Key processes: discovering, exploring, understanding] (ACLGEU152 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • exploring the function of language in social and educational life, for example, listing and discussing how, where and why they use language in the course of a day
  • discovering some of the English words used by German speakers (das Internet, die App, Stopp!, Sorry!) and considering if they are the same kinds of words as those borrowed from German by English
  • understanding that German, like all languages, is constantly expanding to include new words and expressions in response to changing intercultural experiences, for example, Fast Food, Fairness

Role of language and culture

Understand that own and others’ language use is shaped by and reflects the values, ideas and norms of a community

[Key concepts: norms, values; Key processes: observing, comparing, connecting] (ACLGEU153 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • recognising that texts such as stories have a social and cultural purpose, for example, the moral of a fairy tale (Aschenputtel) and comparing the kinds of personal characteristics that are depicted in texts as desirable
  • recognising that language use can have connections to cultural practices, such as expressions from family or religious celebrations, or from outdoor activities such as sports, for example, Gott sei Dank!, ‘Howzat!’, ‘fair go’
  • discussing situations of culturally inappropriate language use and noticing what makes them inappropriate and how this may be addressed, for example, addressing an adult who is not a family member with du instead of Sie
  • noticing the impact of own assumptions about people from German-speaking countries, their language and culture, when listening to, reading and viewing texts, and considering how German speakers too may make assumptions and generalisations about Australians

Years 5 and 6 Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 6, students use written and spoken German for classroom interactions, to carry out transactions, and to share ideas and opinions, relate experiences and express feelings. They use complete sentences in familiar contexts to ask questions such as, Bist du fertig? Was machst du jetzt? Verstehst du das? respond to requests and share experiences of learning, for example, Ich kann gut sprechen, aber ich finde das Lesen und Schreiben schwierig. They use descriptive and expressive vocabulary, including adjectives such as aufgeregt, glücklich, nervös, sauer and traurig, to express feelings and make statements such as Ich nehme ein Käsebrötchen. They use appropriate intonation for simple statements, questions and exclamations, and correct pronunciation, for example, for the two different pronunciations of ch. They gather and compare information from different sources about social and natural worlds, and convey information and opinions in different formats to suit specific audiences and purposes. They describe characters, events and ideas encountered in texts, and re-create imaginative texts to reflect their imaginative experience. When creating texts, they manipulate modelled language to describe current, recurring and future actions, for example, Wir gehen morgen schwimmen. Kommst du mit? Es geht mir nicht gut. and produce original sentences with common regular and irregular verbs in the present tense, including limited forms of the modal verbs dürfen and müssen and some common separable verbs such as mitbringen and fernsehen. They use adjectives, adverbs and adverbial phrases to qualify meaning, for example, viel Wasser, neue Schuhe; lieber, oft, jeden Tag. They explain aspects of German language and culture, recognising that there are not always equivalent expressions in English, and create a range of bilingual texts to support their own language learning and the school community. They describe aspects of their intercultural interactions that are unfamiliar or uncomfortable, and discuss their own reactions and adjustments.

Students give examples of how German language and culture are continuously changing and are influenced by other languages and cultures. They identify and apply some of the systematic sentence structure and word order rules of German. They identify rules for pronunciation and apply phonic and grammatical knowledge to spell and write unfamiliar words, for example, words containing ch, j, w and z, and diphthongs such as au, ei, eu and ie. They apply the conventions of commonly used text types, and identify differences in language features and text structures. They give examples of the variety of ways German is used by different people in different contexts. They make connections between culture and language use, and identify ways that language use is shaped by and reflects the values, ideas and norms of a community.


Years 5 and 6 Work Sample Portfolios