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Context statement

The place of the French language and culture in Australia and in the world
French is a major world language, spoken as the first language in more than two dozen countries on five continents and as an official language in 33 countries.

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PDF documents

Resources and support materials for the Australian Curriculum: Languages - French are available as PDF documents. 
Languages - French: Sequence of content
Languages - French: Sequence of Achievement - F-10 Sequence
Languages - French: Sequence of …

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Years 9 and 10

Years 9 and 10 Band Description

The nature of the learners

At this level, students bring existing knowledge of French language and culture and a range of learning strategies to their learning. They are increasingly aware of the world beyond their own and are engaging with youth-related and social and environmental issues. They require continued guidance and mentoring, but are increasingly independent in terms of analysis, reflection and monitoring of their language learning and intercultural experiences. They are considering future pathways and options, including the possible role of French in these.

French language learning and use

This is a period of language exploration, vocabulary expansion and experimentation with different modes of communication (for example, digital and hypermedia, collaborative performance and group discussions). Learners become more confident in communicating in a wider range of contexts through greater control of language structures and increased understanding of the variability of language use. They use French to communicate and interact; to access and exchange information; to express feelings and opinions; to participate in imaginative and creative experiences; and to create, interpret and analyse a wider range of texts and experiences. They use French more fluently, with a greater degree of self-correction and repair. They reference the accuracy of their language use against a stronger frame of grammatical knowledge. They demonstrate understanding of language variation and change and of how intercultural experience, technology, media and globalisation influence communication.

Contexts of interaction

Learners interact with peers, teachers and other French speakers in immediate and local contexts, and with wider communities and cultural resources via virtual and online environments. They may access additional French experience through community events such as film festivals, interschool events or cultural performances.

Texts and resources

Learners use texts designed for language learning such as textbooks, teacher-generated materials and online resources. Learning is enriched by exposure to a range of authentic materials designed for or generated by young French speakers in France and other francophone regions, such as video clips, magazine features, television programs or advertisements. Students take some responsibility for sourcing additional materials to support their own learning.

Features of French language use

Learners expand their knowledge and control of grammatical elements such as verb tenses (l’imparfait, le futur simple, le conditionnel) and emphatic, direct and indirect object pronouns. They extend their knowledge of text types and language functions by maintaining a balance between form-focused activities and communicative tasks and performance. Task characteristics and conditions involve collaborative as well as independent language planning and performance, and strategic use of language and cultural resources. Tasks involve interpreting, creating, evaluating and performing. Learners engage in critical analysis of texts such as posters, advertisements or news reports, identifying how language choices reflect perspectives and shape meaning.

Learners examine the processes involved in learning and using a different language, recognising them as cognitive, cultural and personal as well as linguistic. They explore the reciprocal nature of intercultural communication: how moving between different languages and cultural systems impacts on ways of thinking and behaving; and how successful communication requires flexibility, awareness and openness to alternative ways. They develop the capacity to ‘decentre’ from normative ways of thinking and communicating, to consider themselves through the eyes of others, and to communicate in interculturally appropriate ways.

Level of support

Support at this level of learning includes provision of rich and varied stimulus materials, continued scaffolding and modelling of language functions and communicative tasks, and explicit instruction and explanation of the grammatical system, with opportunities for learners to discuss, clarify, practise and apply their knowledge. Critical and constructive teacher feedback combines with peer support and self-review to monitor and evaluate learning outcomes (for example, portfolios, peer review, e–journalling).

The role of English

English continues to be used for substantive discussion, explanation and analysis. This allows learners to talk in depth and detail about their experience of learning French, and about their thoughts on culture, identity and intercultural experience. English is the language of analysis and critique, supporting discussion of concepts such as ‘stereotypes’, ‘difference’, ‘diversity’ and ‘values’. It allows for a degree of expression and debate that is beyond learners’ communicative capabilities in French.


Years 9 and 10 Content Descriptions

Socialising

Discuss and compare young people’s interests, behaviours and values across cultural contexts, using formal and informal registers

[Key concepts: perspectives, generation, change, cultural diversity; Key processes: exchanging, responding, discussing] (ACLFRC073 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • using different forms of communication, including formal debates and informal exchanges, to discuss young people’s experience in contemporary culture, for example, la santé des jeunes, la vie des banlieues, les rapports avec les parents
  • initiating and sustaining conversation by introducing topics, inviting contributions or asking for clarification, for example, je n’ai pas bien compris … si on parlait de…? qu’est-ce que vous en pensez?
  • focusing on oral fluency and accuracy, exploring how rhythm, pitch and the use of connectives (for example, normalement…à vrai dire…) and gestures contribute to maintaining momentum and increasing confidence and engagement
  • contributing to online discussions with young people in French-speaking contexts, comparing aspects of school and home life, for example, les examens, le stress, les sports, les droits, les responsabilités
Engage in shared activities such as planning and managing events, exchanging resources and information

[Key concepts: communication, collaboration, information exchange; Key processes: calculating, predicting, planning] (ACLFRC074 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Sustainability
  • using online and digital forms of communication such as email, chat forums and community websites to plan shared events or activities, for example, intercultural components of the fête de la musique, or a cahier/guide de recommandations for language learners
  • planning a demonstration or performance for family and friends to showcase what they know and can do in French, incorporating factual, fictional and expressive elements and some interpretation and explanation of linguistic and cultural features of French language use
  • organising real or simulated forums, protests or rallies to raise awareness of environmental, social or ethical issues, for example, les droits des animaux, le développement durable, les préjugés
    • Sustainability
  • creating a collaborative communications project such as a daily news segment for a community television or radio station, building informations discourse and using appropriate terms to introduce, identify and summarise, for example, en directe de… notre envoyé spécial… l’enquête de… les titres/en tête/à la une de cette édition…
  • transacting for goods and services, considering concepts such as value, availability, competition and ethics
Compare and reflect on the experience of learning and using French

[Key concepts: metalanguage, reflection, awareness; Key processes: expressing, reflecting, analysing] (ACLFRC075 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • using questionnaires or surveys to collect and compare each other’s reflections on learning and using French, identifying challenges and gains and tracking different stages of learning, for example, au début, c’était comment?…petit à petit…; finalement…j’ai trouvé que…
  • communicating with other young learners of languages via email, online forums or video-conferencing, comparing experiences and challenges, for example, C’est comment pour toi? C’est difficile pour vous d’apprendre l’anglais? Moi, je trouve que…
  • using constructions such as il faut…, on doit…, on peut…, c’est impossible de… to generalise and summarise key aspects of learning to communicate in a new language and cultural context

Informing

Research and evaluate information from different perspectives on local and global issues, identifying how culture and context affect how information is presented

[Key concepts: standpoint, representation, cultural literacy; Key processes: researching, comparing, analysing] (ACLFRC076 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • selecting samples of spoken, written and digital texts that convey cultural as well as factual information (for example, regional news headlines, local community announcements, advertisements, notices in public spaces), and providing explanations and commentary on particular cultural aspects
  • researching a topic of global significance (for example, l’immigration, la jeunesse, l’action humanitaire, les langues mondiales), and identifying and explaining how texts reflect different perspectives and priorities
  • analysing and summarising interviews with high-profile speakers, such as political leaders or sports personalities, and listing words or expressions that provide cultural or contextual information
  • presenting commentaries collected from print, digital and personal sources of information on issues of relevance to young people (for example, la publicité, la santé des jeunes, les liens familiaux), and classifying according to viewpoints and perspectives
  • engaging in critical reading of texts such as product advice, news reports or travel brochures, considering questions such as intention and perspective, and rewriting key elements from a different perspective
Convey information on selected topics, using different modes of presentation to suit different audiences or to achieve different purposes

[Key concepts: content, audience, mode; Key processes: selecting, designing, aligning] (ACLFRC077 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Sustainability
  • creating different elements for a general information evening for peers and parents on topics such as les échanges culturelles, le tabagisme or les jeunes et la lecture/les médias sociaux, combining formats such as displays, posters, performances and printed material
  • creating a web page to provide information for young job seekers in different regional and cultural contexts (for example, les stations de ski, au pair à la ferme, le travail saisonnier), using formats such as databases, charts, maps and video clips
  • designing texts pitched to specific age or interest groups, making and explaining choices in relation to vocabulary, structure, and visual and cultural elements, (for example, fashion advice for teens, tips for healthier living, local information for new migrants)
  • summarising and presenting information relating to topics or themes studied in other curriculum areas, using different modes of presentation to cater for different learning styles, for example, charts, diagrams, recorded spoken commentary or demonstration to explain eco-systems or recycling
    • Sustainability
  • referencing cultural trends in contemporary France and other francophone communities, for example by presenting and commenting on community texts associated with cultural activities related to les fêtes religieuses or les fêtes civiles (Hanoucca, la Messe de Minuit, les Fêtes du Mawlid, le 1er mai)

Creating

Analyse how expressive and imaginative texts create aesthetic, humorous or emotional effects in ways that reflect cultural influence

[Key concepts: culture, humour, expression, tradition; Key processes: interpreting, analysing, evaluating] (ACLFRC078 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • expressing emotional or aesthetic responses to texts such as short stories, poems, cartoons, films and songs (for example, c’est émouvant, c’est troublant, ils sont mélancoliques, c’est trop beau, c’est amusant, ça fait rire), and identifying how mood is created and narrative is developed through language and expression
  • talking about how imaginative texts use structure, language and mood to build action, develop character and position the reader, using modelled descriptive and analytic language, for example, Les adjectifs et les adverbes sont très évocatifs; il y a un rythme qui crée un atmosphère de tristesse; la voix du narrateur calme le lecteur
  • comparing lyrics, themes and styles of popular French- and English-language songs, and tracking similarities and differences in genres and modes of expression, for example by comparing winners of Australian Idol and Francouvertes or La Voix
  • reading, viewing or listening to extracts from expressive contemporary texts such as poems, songs, dance, street art and performance, identifying elements of expression that reflect French cultural traditions or experience
Create imaginative texts involving moods and effects designed to engage different audiences

[Key concepts: imagination, creativity, stimulus; Key processes: planning, projecting, engaging, entertaining] (ACLFRC079 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • creating characters to role-play imagined encounters in possible intercultural contexts suggested by resources such as news reports or feature articles, (for example, au métro — jour de grève, à la douane — papiers perdus)
  • composing and performing poems, songs, monologues or dialogues to evoke amusement, sympathy or surprise, (for example, les chants d’amours, les virelangues, les récits de guerre, le rap, le rock)
  • creating performances or poems that reflect on significant French or Australian celebrations or historical events (for example, le 1er mai, National Sorry Day, le 11 novembre, Anzac Day)
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures

Translating

Consider the nature of translating and interpreting and the role of culture when transferring meaning from one language to another

[Key concepts: culture, text, context, perspective; Key processes: comparing, analysing, critical and cultural reading] (ACLFRC080 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • experimenting with literal translations of popular French expressions or idioms, noticing when this creates confusion (for example, être bien dans sa peau, dans son assiette, avoir le cafard, revenons à nos moutons) and recognising the nature and function of cultural elements of language and communication
  • finding examples of words, expressions and behaviours used in Australian English that do not translate literally into French (for example, ‘bush tucker’, ‘surf’s up’, ‘schoolies’), and providing cultural explanations for French speakers
  • experimenting with different resources to assist in translation, including monolingual and bilingual dictionaries, encyclopaedias, electronic dictionaries and translators, for example by comparing individual translations, back-translating, swapping useful references
  • considering the nature of translation, with reference to different strategies such as decoding literal meaning (word for word), reading for meaning (sense for sense) and cultural reading (between the lines)
  • interpreting gestures used by French speakers to signal meanings such as Parfait! J’ai du nez! c’est fini, comparing with gestures used in Australian English and other known languages, and incorporating some of them into own language production and communicative interactions to appropriate effect
  • recognising the need to sometimes recast language, and considering why one language may use more words than another to communicate a particular meaning, for example, Je vous prie, Monsieur, de croire à l’expression de mes sentiments distingués versus ‘Yours sincerely’
Create glossaries to interpret cultural aspects of contemporary and traditional French texts

[Key concepts: representation, critical and cultural literacy; Key processes: referencing, explaining, interpreting] (ACLFRC081 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • collecting and explaining to non-French speakers expressions and cultural allusions encountered in French texts associated with historical, religious or civic events or traditions, (for example, la Marianne, le tricolore, la Toussaint, le 1er mai)
  • exploring French colloquialisms, argot and idioms (for example, tomber dans les pommes, les doigts dans le nez) that are typically used by different social groups, (for example, les jeunes, les sportifs, les étudiants)
  • exploring texts for terms associated with particular elements of French lifestyles (for example, la cuisine, la mode, les loisirs, la famille), noting differences between traditional and more contemporary texts and explaining these differences in relation to changes in cultural practice
  • mapping France or other francophone countries as represented on internet sites or tourist brochures in terms of regional and cultural diversity, for example, la France gastronomique: la choucroute d’Alsace, la quiche Lorraine, le bœuf bourguignon, la tapenade Provençale; la Polynésie: les cinq archipels, les ȋles et les atolls

Reflecting

Reflect on the experience of learning and using French, considering how intercultural communication involves shared responsibility for meaning making

[Key concepts: reciprocity, understanding, intercultural experience; Key processes: communicating, observing, reflecting, analysing, responding] (ACLFRC082 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • considering how learning and using French and other languages offers different ways of interpreting the world and representing experience
  • keeping a record (for example, journal, log, posting on forum) of critical incidents in the course of intercultural language learning across different levels, (for example, breakdowns or breakthroughs in communication, repair and recovery strategies, and responses and insights to interactions)
  • comparing understandings of the relationship between language, culture and identity, using symbols, graphic representations, images and metaphors to represent how the relationship works
  • discussing how intercultural communication involves being flexible, responsive and open to alternative ways of communicating, (for example, responding to different levels of emotionality or confrontation in debate, or different levels of respect in casual exchanges or service encounters)
  • reflecting on how their own language use and communicative style might be perceived by French speakers, considering concepts such as ‘culture’, ‘attitudes’, ‘assumptions’ and ‘values’
Reflect on own cultural identity and how it shapes personal ways of communicating and thinking

[Key concepts: identity, culture, communication; Key processes: reflecting, explaining] (ACLFRC083 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • developing an enquiry-oriented stance to own cultural identity and communication style, reflecting on existing assumptions about what makes for effective communication and on any changes in perspective as a result of learning French
  • analysing how cultural norms impact on interpretations of French language texts and experiences, (for example, comparing own with others’ reactions to particular cultural texts, events or practices)
  • reflecting on own cultural identity in terms of family background, community relationships and contact with languages, (including contact with French and other languages and cultures), tracking changes over time or context
  • composing a ‘cultural ID profile’ to exchange with French-speaking friends, making decisions about what points of information will be of most interest

Systems of language

Increase control of regular and irregular elements of spoken and written French, using elements such as liaisons, accents and expression

[Key concepts: liaisons, accents, expression, style; Key processes: recognising, classifying, discriminating] (ACLFRU084 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • recognising ways in which written language is different to spoken language, such as being more crafted, precise, elaborated and complex, (for example, the use of interrelated clauses and support detail (Le Pays de Galles a remporté, samedi, le Tournoi des VI Nations en corrigeant l’Angleterre, pourtant favourite, sur le score de 30 à 3 au Millennium Stadium de Cardiff)
  • recognising the impermanent and fluid nature of spoken language, identifying features such as interactivity, and the use of repetition, pauses, interruptions and contractions, (for example, the dropping of ne in negative structures (je sais pas trop), incomplete sentences and reliance on non-verbal elements and vocal expression (Dis donc, t’es là? Je suis déjà là — t’es où toi?)
  • recognising and responding to challenges associated with clarity and pace in audio texts, (for example, station or airport announcements or recorded phone messages)
Analyse how grammatical elements such as tenses and verb moods impact on the making of meaning

[Key concepts: grammatical analysis, register, tenor; Key processes: identifying, defining, classifying] (ACLFRU085 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • noticing how grammatical choices can shade meaning, determine perspective and establish relationship, (for example, an imperative verb mood can indicate authority or enthusiasm (Arrêtez! Allons-y! Donnez-moi votre billet, Mademoiselle); shifting from the use of vous to tu can signal a more informal, friendly relationship)
  • exploring how choices of words such as nouns and adjectives can indicate values and attitudes, (for example, c’est un bon à rien/c’est un brave jeune homme; ce sont des illégaux/ce sont des réfugiés)
  • understanding the function of verb tenses to situate events in time (for example, ils vont partir demain matin, je suis allée au ciné hier soir) and to express intention or desire, (for example, je voudrais bien aller à Tunis avec toi!)
  • recognising variations in conjugation for verbs such as nettoyer, envoyer, essayer, appeler, acheter, manger, (for example, nous mangeons, j’essaie)
  • using l’imparfait, understanding how to distinguish between a completed and a continuing action in the past, (for example, nous étions déjà au lit quand Papa a téléphoné)
  • using le passé composé verb forms, recognising verbs conjugated with être as the auxiliary that involve agreement between subject and past participle, (for example, elles sont parties)
  • understanding and using in simple constructions le futur, le conditionnel and le plus-que- parfait tenses
  • being exposed to le subjonctif verb forms used in set phrases such as il faut que tu partes, il faut que je finisse mes devoirs
  • understanding the function of the reflexive pronoun and practising using the reflexive verb structure, (for example, je me suis levée à sept heures, je me suis entraȋnée…)
  • understanding the function and use of relative pronouns such as qui, que, dont
  • understanding that past participles agree with the preceding direct object when the verb is conjugated with the auxiliary verb avoir, for example, J’ai acheté une tartelette aux fraises — je l’ai mangée trop vite!
  • understanding and using infinitive verb forms and phrasal verbs, such as avoir besoin de faire quelque chose, commencer à faire…
  • using relative, emphatic and direct/indirect object pronouns, for example, qui, que, elle, eux, lui, leur, le, la, les
  • understanding the use of the si clause and how to coordinate meaning through various tenses, for example, si j’avais voulu, je serais partie de bonne heure
  • further developing a metalanguage to discuss and explain grammatical forms and functions, for example, ‘conditional tense’, ‘relative and emphatic pronouns’, ‘impersonal expressions’
Analyse how different types of text incorporate cultural and contextual elements

[Key concepts: context, culture, perspective; Key processes: comparing, analysing, identifying] (ACLFRU086 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • analysing how writers of community texts such as advertisements, radio requests or online trading posts make decisions in relation to language, style and register in order to achieve their purpose and suit the context, (for example by using personal pronouns, engaging language and images, or by creating problems/offering solutions (Un…deux, un…deux, on rit, on s’esclaffe, on glousse! Pour être au top lors de l’arrivée des beaux jours!)
  • understanding the dynamic relationship between different modes of communication in different cultural contexts, (for example, hybrid texts such as emails or text messages that combine features of spoken and written texts, or formal lectures or news reports that resemble spoken versions of written texts)
  • analysing cultural differences in genres such as cover letters for job applications or letters of complaint, noting protocols and conventions (for example, stating the purpose of a formal letter at the beginning: le recyclage proposé dans notre ville..)
  • collecting, interpreting and using textual conventions popular with young French speakers, for example, contractions, abbreviations and acronyms used in text messaging (bjr = bonjour; A+ = à plus; biz = bisous; 12C4 = un de ces quatre)

Language variation and change

Analyse and explain how and why language is used differently in different contexts and relationships

[Key concepts: genres, register, variation; Key processes: grammatical and lexical analysis] (ACLFRU087 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • recognising the diversity of spoken forms of French from region to region (for example, les accents du Midi, l’accent parisien, toulousain, picard) and from country to country (le Québecois, La Réunion), considering concepts such as la norme, la diversité, l’intelligibilité and les élites in terms of how language variation can both reflect and shape social and cultural processes
  • exploring how texts achieve different effects, (for example, moving from generic terms such as les fleurs to specific detail such as les violettes, les jonquilles, les roses mignonnes in advertisements to suggest superior or specialised taste)
  • understanding the power of language to influence people’s actions and beliefs, for example by analysing language used in community appeals in response to natural disasters
  • comparing language and textual features used in texts to entertain different age groups, (for example, amusing rhymes for les tout petits, dessins d’humour for older children, and les blagues, l’humour noir and l’humour adolescent for older students)
Explore changes to both French and Australian English, and identify reasons for these changes, such as technology, popular culture and intercultural exchange

[Key concepts: globalisation, exchange, influence; Key processes: mapping, classifying, analysing] (ACLFRU088 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • exploring the concept of the ‘ecology’ of French and of other languages, including English; that is, the interaction of language with constantly changing environments, referencing influences on contemporary French language use such as globalisation and technology
  • identifying elements of language use in the Australian community that reflect the linguistic and cultural diversity of the population, (for example, intercultural exchange and experience), and words and expressions borrowed/used across contexts and activities such as sports, martial arts, dance, cooking, fashion
  • considering the development of le franglais in communities of French speakers (for example, la pharmacie du corner, faire du shopping), and developing awareness of some aspects of current debates and discussions around its use
Identify examples of French language used to influence social and cultural relationships and practices

[Key concepts: authority, language as power, inclusion, exclusion; Key processes: scanning, selecting, analysing] (ACLFRU089 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • finding examples of language used for social commentary or to influence actions or beliefs, (for example, emotive language and images in reports on cruelty to children or to animals [la violence, la négligence, l’intimidation, l’abus; menacer, blesser, battre])
  • understanding how language variation can reflect cultural and social identity, inclusion or exclusion, (for example, inclusive language of political speeches (Nous les pères et les mères des futurs citoyens de notre belle France…), or inclusion and exclusion through the use of langage codifié (le verlan d’une sous-culture: zyva — vas-y; ouf — fou; zarbi-bizarre)
  • examining how specialised language associated with professional, commercial or cultural ways of speaking or writing can create barriers for some members of a language community, (for example, legal or medical terms, arts-related expressions, or bureaucratic language)

Role of language and culture

Understand that language and culture are interrelated, that they shape and are shaped by each other

[Key concepts: culture, language, meaning; Key processes: discussing, reflecting, comparing] (ACLFRU090 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • comparing definitions of ‘language’ and of ‘culture’, and explaining how they relate to each other
  • considering how language both reflects and shapes cultural distinctions such as community, social class, gender and generation
  • reflecting on the experience of moving between cultures in and out of school, in local and virtual environments, and through the experience of learning and using French
  • exploring the reciprocal element of intercultural communication, considering how own cultural ways of thinking and behaving affect attitudes and interactions and influence other people’s responses or interpretations

Years 9 and 10 Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 10, students use written and spoken French to communicate with teachers, peers and others in a range of settings and for a range of purposes They use language to access and exchange information on a broad range of social, cultural and youth-related issues (for example, student politics and priorities, the environment, virtual worlds). They socialise, express feelings and opinions, and use expressive and descriptive language to participate in different modes of imaginative and creative expression. They initiate conversations and discussion (such as Qu’est-ce que vous pensez au sujet de ... ? A mon avis ...), change or elaborate on topics (for example, Oui, mais … d’autre part ...), and provide feedback and encouragement (for example, En effet - c’est intéressant; et toi, qu’est-ce que tu en dis?). They employ self-correction and repair strategies, and use non-verbal elements such as gestures, pacing and pitch to maintain momentum and engage interest. They locate and evaluate information on local and global issues from a range of perspectives and sources. They produce informative, persuasive and imaginative texts, incorporating relative clauses and adverbial phrases, using some specialised vocabulary and cohesive devices. Students use présent, passé composé, imparfait and futur proche tenses in their own texts, and the conditional tense to express intention or preference (for example, Je voudrais aller au cinéma ce soir). They use with support futur and plus-que-parfait tenses. Students translate and interpret a range of French and English texts, comparing versions and analysing processes.

Students explain differences between spoken and written French, and identify the contribution of non-verbal elements of spoken communication and the crafted nature of written text (for example, grammatical elaboration, cohesion). They provide examples of the blurring of these differences in modes of communication such as text messages, emails or conversation transcripts. They describe how languages change, borrow from, build upon and blend with each other (for example, le franglais). They demonstrate understanding of the power of language to shape relationships, to include and exclude. They use appropriate terminology to explain some irregularities of grammatical patterns and rules (such as irregular verb forms, different word order of some adjective-noun combinations), and textual conventions associated with familiar genres such as invitations, apologies or music reviews. They reflect on their own cultural perspectives and discuss how these are impacted by French language and culture learning.


Years 9 and 10 Work Sample Portfolios