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Context statement

The place of the French language and culture in Australia and in the world
French is a major world language, spoken as the first language in more than two dozen countries on five continents and as an official language in 33 countries.

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PDF documents

Resources and support materials for the Australian Curriculum: Languages - French are available as PDF documents. 
Languages - French: Sequence of content
Languages - French: Sequence of Achievement - F-10 Sequence
Languages - French: Sequence of …

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Years 7 and 8

Years 7 and 8 Band Description

The nature of the learners

These years represent a transition to secondary school. Students in this pathway are continuing to study French, bringing with them an established capability to interact in different situations, to engage with a variety of texts and to communicate with some assistance about their immediate world and that of France and other French-speaking communities. They have experience in analysing the major features of the language system and in reflecting on the nature of intercultural exchanges in which they are involved.

French language learning and use

French is used for classroom interactions and transactions, for explaining and practising language forms and for developing cultural understanding. Additional opportunities for interaction in the target language are provided by purposeful and integrated use of ICT. Learners work both collaboratively and independently, exploring different modes and genres of communication, with particular reference to their own current interests. They pool language knowledge and resources to plan, problem-solve, monitor and reflect. They use modelled and rehearsed language in familiar and unfamiliar contexts and increasingly generate original and personal language. They make cross-curricular connections and explore intercultural perspectives and experience.

Contexts of interaction

The primary context for learning remains the French language class; however, there may be increasing opportunities for interaction with peers in France and other French-speaking communities through technology, partner-school arrangements or community connections. Learners have access to additional French resources through websites, social media and radio streaming.

Features of French language use

Learners expand their range of vocabulary beyond their immediate world. They make clearer distinctions between sounds and intonation patterns. They develop more detailed grammatical knowledge, using additional tenses (le passé composé, le futur proche), some reflexive verb forms and additional irregular verbs. They become more familiar with features of different types of text (for example, informative, transactional, expressive), using this understanding to guide their own text production. They create and present more varied texts (such as poems, web pages and brochures), plan events and join in competitions and debates. They use French with increasing accuracy and fluency, drafting and editing texts to improve structure and effect. They make connections more confidently between texts and cultural contexts.

Texts and resources

Learners work with a range of texts specifically designed for learning French in schools, such as textbooks, videos, readers and online resources. They also access materials created for French-speaking communities, such as films (with subtitles), websites, advertisements and magazines. Authentic French-community resources provide access to additional cultural expression and experience.

Level of support

This is a period of review and consolidation and of engaging with new and challenging learning experiences. Continued scaffolding, modelling and material support are required to manage this transitional phase. Learners require modelled language use, particularly at the paragraph and whole text level for written language and for developing fluency and accuracy in spoken French. Focused attention on grammatical and textual features supports learners’ development as text producers. Learners are encouraged to become more autonomous, to self-monitor and to reflect on their learning.

The role of English

French is increasingly used at this level for classroom interactions and routines, for task participation and structured discussions. English continues to be used for more complex elements of instruction, and more substantive discussion, analysis and reflection in relation to abstract concepts. Learners continue to develop a metalanguage for thinking and talking about language, culture, identity and the experience of learning and using French.


Years 7 and 8 Content Descriptions

Socialising

Participate in a range of spoken and written interactions, for example, exchanging views or experiences, apologising or excusing, inviting or congratulating

[Key concepts: friendship, respect, communication; Key processes: responding, expressing, connecting] (ACLFRC055 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Sustainability
  • using the appropriate register when exchanging greetings, introductions, apologies or health enquiries, for example, Salut mon pote! Ça roule? Bonjour, Mademoiselle Charpent, comment allez-vous? Enchanté! Je m’excuse, Monsieur, vous vous appellez comment? Ciao, Pierre, à tout de suite!
  • using descriptive and expressive language to talk about aspects of school, home and social life, for example, Ma sœur m’ennuie parce que…; c’est bien/dûr d’être ado car…; ce que je déteste/j’adore, c’est la musique/l’informatique /les maths; s’il faut redoubler…!
  • communicating in face-to-face or online discussion and debate with peers and French-speaking contacts about social and environmental issues, such as l’influence de la musique, l’environnement digital or le recyclage, referencing community attitudes and changing practices
    • Sustainability
  • composing formal and informal versions of invitations and/or replies to invitations, taking account of the context and the relationship with the recipient of the text
Engage in tasks and activities that involve negotiation and problem-solving

[Key concepts: value, design, audience, purpose; Key processes: negotiating, considering, reflecting, evaluating] (ACLFRC056 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • planning and participating in learning experiences that combine linguistic and cultural elements (for example, an excursion to a French restaurant, exhibition, festival or performance), rehearsing language forms, structures, vocabulary and behaviours (l’entrée, le plat principal, le fromage, le dessert; comme boisson…l’addition, s’il vous plaȋt)
  • organising action-oriented projects with a school or community focus, using print, visual and digital resources to raise awareness, communicate concern or present a position, for example, une campagne d’information et de sensibilisation around issues such as l’influence des réseaux sociaux or la sécurité des cyclistes
  • making arrangements to cater for an event (for example, des baguettes, des fromages, de l’eau minérale, des saucisses, du pȃté), calculating quantities and prices, for example, trois douzaines de…, 40 litres de…
  • asking, giving and following directions to real or virtual locations (for example, continuez jusqu’à… prenez le métro jusqu’au Musée du Louvre…prenez la troisième rue à gauche… en face de…), using electronic information devices, apps, street maps or directories
  • planning and running a class vide-grenier or marché aux puces, preparing labels and fliers, rehearsing language for negotiating, buying, swapping and bargaining (for example, Vente flash! un très bon prix, un prix cassé, bon marché, cher)
Interact in classroom activities and discussions through asking and responding to open-ended questions, offering opinions and explaining positions

[Key concepts: exploratory talk, discussion, exchange; Key processes: eliciting, prompting, responding, explaining] (ACLFRC057 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • initiating and extending conversations and discussion, for example, by using connectives such as puis, et après, ensuite and alors que…
  • inviting people into conversations (for example, et toi, qu’est-ce que tu dis?), and using expressions such as n’est-ce pas? and non-verbal strategies such as wait time or facial expressions to signify interest or attention
  • using simple and compound sentences to structure arguments and to explain or justify a position, for example, D’abord… et puis… en plus… finalement; ce qui est intéressant c’est que…; ce que je trouve…

Informing

Access, summarise and analyse information from different sources relating to contemporary community and lifestyle issues

[Key concepts: values, generation, culture; Key processes: researching, comparing, evaluating, reflecting] (ACLFRC058 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • accessing, collating and analysing information on youth-related issues (for example, la musique, la télévision, les sports) from sources such as the internet, magazines and personal communications, and classifying findings into themes, for example, la jeunesse urbaine, l’environnement, le fast food
  • collecting information on topics related to lifestyle choices, explaining changes in focus and perspective over different periods, for example, Gitane - vous apporte, sans réserves, le plaisir de fumer, 1957: sans tabac, prenons la vie à pleins poumons, 2014
  • listening to or viewing informative texts such as television news reports or feature articles, and noting key words, specialised terms or points of information to be reused in own newsflash or roman photo, for example, en direct, les dernières nouvelles, l’information continue, la météo
  • researching young people’s lifestyles across French-speaking cultures and contexts, comparing information from different cultural contexts to identify the influence of factors such as geography, climate, and social and community environment, for example, les colonies de vacances, les boulots, les sports aquatiques, les jeux vidéos
Organise and present information and ideas on different topics, issues or events, comparing perspectives and experiences

[Key concepts: perspective, engagement, action, debate; Key processes: managing information, shaping text, engaging] (ACLFRC059 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • organising and presenting information to raise awareness or invite action in relation to social or community issues, using multimodal forms of presentation such as sound and visual images or websites with hyperlinks
  • classifying information obtained from different print and electronic resources in a shared database of categories, themes and genres, showing relationships between ideas, topics and key language
  • presenting findings related to the investigation of a social or cultural issue (for example, la mode et les codes vestimentaires: l’influence des marques), summarising opinions and attitudes collected from surveys, interviews or media sources
  • conveying information and ideas by matching language features and text types to topics and themes, for example, using emotive images and captions to highlight issues such as la faim or l’égalité des sexes, or rap rhythms and punchlines to engage with controversial ideas or provoke reactions
  • combining modes of presentation such as displays, videos or music to explore social and cultural themes, for example, l’Australie et les régions asiatiques, or le multiculturalisme
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia

Creating

Respond to a variety of imaginative texts, analysing ideas, themes, values and techniques used to engage and entertain audiences

[Key concepts: audience, engagement, themes; Key processes: responding, analysing, contextualising, explaining] (ACLFRC060 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • comparing cartoons or video clips from different eras, identifying themes and representations, for example, traditional fables and contes with moral messages and contemporary texts such as cartoons that include diverse perspectives on social issues
  • transcribing short samples of action-related dialogue from texts designed to create suspense or excitement (for example, Tintin et l’étoile mysterieuse: allons-y! Ah non, c’est impossible! Personne? Ah magnifique!), and building them into their own performance dialogues or captions for comics or storybooks
  • responding to different expressions of humour in French (for example, le mime, les blagues, les jeux de mots, les devinettes), and comparing these with Australian expressions of humour
Create simple songs, plays or stories to entertain others, involving imagined contexts and characters

[Key concepts: mood, drama, effect, audience; Key processes: character and context building, creating] (ACLFRC061 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • creating and performing texts such as les raps, les poèmes or les sketchs, experimenting with the musicality, rhythms and non-verbal expressiveness of French
  • performing unscripted explorations of characters, contexts and concepts (for example, l’amitié, la peur, la liberté), using gestures, voice and props to build mood, drama and effect and to explore expression and emotion
  • creating simple texts such as picture books, bedtime stories or cartoons for younger children, selecting appropriate language, rhythms and images to enrich the visual or listening experience

Translating

Translate and interpret texts, compare own translation to classmates’, and consider why there might be differences in interpretation and how language reflects elements of culture

[Key concepts: culture, equivalence, idiom; Key processes: translating, interpreting, mediating] (ACLFRC062 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • interpreting phrases and expressions that do not translate literally (for example, à tout à l’heure, pas de quoi, courage), identifying similar English expressions and considering possible consequences of the lack of equivalence in terms of intercultural communication
  • translating written expressions associated with politeness and social protocols in French (for example, responding to requests or thanks, or signing postcards or birthday cards: je vous en prie, Madame; amitiés; je t’embrasse très fort…) and comparing with typical expressions in similar messages in English
  • using and evaluating translation resources such as electronic translators and print and digital dictionaries, including monolingual French dictionaries, using prompt questions such as: Does this represent the exact meaning? What other ways could this be interpreted?
  • collecting examples of faux amis (for example, assister à, demander, un médecin, extra, sympathique) and of inaccurate translations of public signs or notices
  • becoming increasingly aware of the fact that some words and expressions cannot be translated and are used in their original form in other languages (for example, ‘nuance’, ‘chic’, ‘silhouette’), and considering the impact of word borrowing on the style and effect of communication
Create bilingual texts such as glossaries, menus, captions or brochures, identifying words or expressions that carry specific cultural meaning in either language

[Key concepts: language, culture, meaning; Key processes: selecting, identifying, explaining, comparing] (ACLFRC063 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • creating glossaries for French-speaking friends to accompany Australian images or texts, explaining, for example, outback lifestyle, inner-city markets, abbreviations such as ‘barbie’ and ‘brekkie’
  • composing menus or programs for French-themed events, including footnotes in English to explain key terms or items, for example, le plat du jour, service compris, l’entr’acte, la mise en scène
  • creating tourist brochures or itineraries for young Australian travellers to French- speaking regions or countries, supplying key words, phrases and cultural protocols, for example, Encore une fois, s’il vous plaȋt; je vais prendre ceci, ça coûte combien? où sont les toilettes? Je vous remercie, Madame — Je vous en prie, Madame

Reflecting

Reflect on cultural differences between French and English communicative styles and on how these affect intercultural interactions

[Key concepts: values, perspective, respect; Key processes: reflecting, analysing, comparing] (ACLFRC064 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • noticing cultural cues that suggest differences in traditions, ideas or values when interacting with French speakers or resources, for example, ways of expressing feelings, or politeness protocols associated with social events
  • discussing elements of successful intercultural communication when using French or other languages, for example, awareness of differences, flexibility, and respect for other perspectives and traditions
  • interacting with young French-speakers who are learning English, comparing views on cultural aspects of communication and discussing individual challenges and gains
  • identifying gestures, intonation patterns and facial expressions that are different in French, and explaining how some could be adopted in other-language contexts or situations
  • reflecting on own ways of communicating and behaving and how these may be interpreted by French speakers
Consider how own biography including family origins, traditions, interests and experience, impacts on identity and communication

[Key concepts: culture, community, communication, identity; Key processes: reflecting, analysing, explaining] (ACLFRC065 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • mapping their own linguistic and cultural profiles, for example by creating a chart/timeline/web profile to highlight formative elements such as family languages, key relationships and intercultural experiences
  • sharing and comparing cultural and intercultural experiences and language capabilities, and exchanging views on the benefits of speaking more than one language, such as having a larger vocabulary to draw on, new insights and perspectives, and opportunities for new experiences
  • identifying events, relationships and experiences that have contributed to building a personal and/or collective sense of identity, and explaining key influences, for example, le voyage, les concours, les amis, la famille, l’équipe

Systems of language

Recognise individual elements of spoken and written words, phrases and non-verbal forms of expression, and notice how they combine to make or to change meaning

[Key concepts: word parts, idioms, expression; Key processes: listening, reading, identifying, describing] (ACLFRU066 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • recognising the function and form of commonly used morphemes, suffixes and prefixes (for example, la camionette, désordre, désagréable, irrégulier, inacceptable, la danseuse), and collecting groups of words that share a common stem (for example, la bouche, la bouchée; le jardin, jardiner, le jardinage)
  • recognising the impact of non-verbal elements of French expression such as hand gestures to replace words (for example, c’est nul, ça suffit!, quoi encore?), or sounds and facial expressions to reinforce spoken language (for example, oh là là! Aïe! T’as fait quoi?)
  • revising the pronunciation of the alphabet, practising spelling out words and using the correct terms for letters and symbols, for example, g, h, j, w, accent aigu, accent cédille
  • distinguishing vowel sounds, for example by recognising distinctions between nasal vowel sounds (cinq, sympa/manger, entre/dont, des bonbons)
Understand and control additional elements of French grammar such as compound tenses, irregular and reflexive verb forms, verb moods and modalities

[Key concepts: tenses, parts of speech, moods, modalities, metalanguage; Key processes: analysing, categorising, distinguishing] (ACLFRU067 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • increasing control of the conjugation of regular verbs in le présent and le passé composé and of high-frequency irregular verbs such as avoir, être, faire, devoir, vouloir, savoir
  • recognising and using idiomatic expressions such as those using avoir, for example, avoir soif, avoir sommeil, avoir peur
  • understanding the form and function of reflexive verbs, for example, il se lève très tard, nous nous promenons chaque soir, je veux m’asseoir à côté de toi
  • extending knowledge of negative constructions such as ne…plus, ne…rien, ne…jamais, ne…que..
  • using le passé composé and le futur proche
  • understanding how to use modal verb forms to express possibility, obligation and ability (for example, je peux m’imaginer…, il doit partir demain), and impersonal expressions such as il faut… and on…
  • learning to use direct object pronouns in conjunction with the present tense, for example, je t’écoute, elle les mange tous les jours!
  • continuing to build a metalanguage to describe grammatical concepts and to organise learning resources, for example, verb charts, vocabulary lists and groups of pronouns, adverbs and adjectives
Analyse the structure and organisation of a range of texts created for purposes such as information exchange or social interaction

[Key concepts: tenor, lexical and rhetorical resources; Key processes: experimenting, reflecting, comparing] (ACLFRU068 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • identifying elements of different types of text (for example, le courriel, la météo, les slogans), and explaining the relationship between the language and structure used and the purpose of the text
  • creating sample texts for a genres resource base, identifying key features and functions, for example, la publicité: les messages directs: n’attendez plus! profitez de…, ou indirects: vous rêvez de… vos enfants méritent…
  • analysing and using informal styles of communication associated with social media texts and texting, such as emoticons and abbreviated language, for example, le sigle MDR (mort de rire)

Language variation and change

Examine how elements of communication such as gestures, facial expressions and choice of language vary according to context and situation

[Key concepts: body language, personal space, expression; Key processes: observing, comparing, analysing] (ACLFRU069 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • comparing and explaining the use of communicative styles in different contexts, for example, une partie de foot au Stade de France (Allez, allez les Bleus!) compared to a written bulletin scolaire (Mathilde s’exprime avec facilité, persévère au travail)
  • analysing the role of formulaic language and symbolic gestures in different contexts and communities, noticing cultural variations, for example, national mottos such as Liberté, égalité, fraternité (la France); Unité, Travail, Progrès (le Chad); ‘Advance Australia’ (l’Australie)
  • comparing elements of communication such as body language, use of personal space and silence in different cultural contexts and exchanges
Reflect on changes in their own use of language(s) over time, noticing how and when new ways are adopted or existing ways adapted

[Key concepts: change, influence, communication, identity; Key processes: observing, reflecting, explaining] (ACLFRU070 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • reflecting on changes in their own ways of communicating, identifying new terms and behaviours which have become part of everyday language through changes in technology and social media, for example, language associated with l’Internet, le portable, les jeux électroniques, electronic messaging replacing handwritten letters or cards
  • examining own and others’ ways of interacting to detect influences from other people, cultures or media products, for example, friends, relatives, teachers, media personalities; travel, education, music and entertainment
  • comparing the experience of learning French and other languages, either in school or in community contexts, and considering how languages intersect or are used for different social functions within families and friendship groups
Investigate the nature and extent of French language use in both Australian and global contexts

[Key concepts: community, arts, fashion, music, cuisine; Key processes: researching, analysing, classifying] (ACLFRU071 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • analysing the influence of French language and culture in international contexts and activities (for example, the Olympic Committee, the International Court of Justice) and in the Australian community, (for example, sporting events, food, fashion, film industry)
  • tracking the contribution of French migrants and settlers to different phases of Australian history,( for example, as explorers, prisoners, refugees, traders, farmers, post-war migrants)
  • researching the extent and impact of French language networks, associations and activities in different Australian communities, (for example by creating a database or information wall, listing activities, events, exchanges and media organisations)

Role of language and culture

Reflect on different aspects of the cultural dimension of learning and using French

[Key concepts: cultural expression, representation, difference, diversity; Key processes: reflecting, comparing, analysing] (ACLFRU072 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • sharing understandings of what culture ‘is’ and how it relates to identity and experience, using statements such as ‘Culture is...’ and ‘Culture can...’
  • comparing challenges and achievements associated with learning French that can be thought of as cultural or intercultural, for example, learning to ‘read between the lines’ to identify cultural information in language; developing the capacity to look objectively at own cultural experience and ways of communicating
  • discussing how own cultural identities are reflected in home, school and social lives, including attitudes and behaviours, and considering how these might be interpreted and responded to by members of different communities
  • identifying changes in own ways of thinking about culture and identity as a result of learning French
  • discussing attitudes towards diversity and difference, including the use of stereotypes and generalisations, and considering how these affect communication

Years 7 and 8 Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 8, students use written and spoken French to interact with teachers, peers and others and to exchange experiences, opinions and views. They use descriptive and expressive language to talk and write about immediate environments, personal interests and feelings and technical language to discuss issues of wider interest (for example, les nouvelles téchnologies, les rapports entre les générations, le travail, la musique). They ask, give and follow directions and instructions, using phrases such as prenez la deuxième rue à gauche ..., suivez le boulevard jusqu’à ... and choisissez la photo. They locate and analyse information from different sources presenting it in modes and formats suitable for the intended audience. They use strategies such as emphasis, repetition and summary to support fluency and expression in shared reading, performances, discussions and debate. They plan, draft and present imaginative, informative and persuasive texts, using simple and compound sentences to structure arguments and to explain or justify a position. Students use regular verbs in the passé composé form independently as well as high-frequency irregular verbs such as faire, être and avoir. They use declarative, imperative and interrogative verbs in affirmative and negative forms. They interpret and translate language which has colloquial or cultural associations in either French or Australian English, providing alternative expressions when equivalence is not possible (for example, à tout à l’heure, good on ya!). They make appropriate language choices when communicating in French in different contexts and situations.

Students use metalanguage to explain language features and elements, using appropriate grammatical terms (such as tenses, genres, agreement). They identify how language features such as vocabulary, tenor and register serve different purposes in different modes. They make connections between texts and contexts, comparing expression and representation in similar texts from different cultural contexts (for example, invitations to celebrations or ceremonies, postcards or letters between friends). Students identify the relationship between language and culture, understanding that personal and community identity are expressed through cultural expression and language use. They reflect on their own ways of communicating, discussing how these might be interpreted by others.