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Context statement

The place of the French language and culture in Australia and in the world
French is a major world language, spoken as the first language in more than two dozen countries on five continents and as an official language in 33 countries.

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PDF documents

Resources and support materials for the Australian Curriculum: Languages - French are available as PDF documents. 
Languages - French: Sequence of content
Languages - French: Sequence of Achievement - F-10 Sequence
Languages - French: Sequence of …

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Years 9 and 10

Years 9 and 10 Band Description

The nature of the learners

Students have prior experience of learning French and bring a range of capabilities, strategies and knowledge that can be applied to new learning. They are expanding the range and nature of their learning experiences and of the contexts within which they communicate with others. They have a growing awareness of the wider world, including the diversity of languages, cultures and forms of intercultural communication. They are considering future pathways and prospects, including how French may feature in these.

French language learning and use

This is a period of language exploration and vocabulary expansion, and of experimentation with different modes of communication such as digital and hypermedia, collaborative performance and group discussions. Increasing control of language structures and systems builds confidence and interest in communicating in a wider range of contexts. Learners use French to communicate and interact, to access and exchange information, to express feelings and opinions, to participate in imaginative and creative experiences, and to design, interpret and analyse a wider range of texts and experiences. They use French more fluently, with a greater degree of self-correction and repair. They reference the accuracy of their language use against a stronger frame of grammatical and systems knowledge. They demonstrate understanding of language variation and change, and of how intercultural experience, technology, media and globalisation influence forms of communication.

Contexts of interaction

The language class remains the principal context for learning and using French. Learners use written and spoken French to interact with peers, teachers and some other French speakers in local contexts and online environments. These exchanges are complemented by interactions with rich and varied language resources and materials. Learners may communicate with young French speakers and access additional resources and materials through ICT and teacher-facilitated connections. They may also participate in local community events such as Alliance Française activities, music or film festivals, or exchange-student hosting.

Texts and resources

Learners engage with a range of language-learning texts and support materials, such as textbooks, videos, apps, media texts and online materials. They also draw increasingly on texts produced for French-speaking communities, in a range of different times and contexts, such as short stories, songs, poems, newspaper reports, films, video clips, blogs and social media texts.

Features of French language use

Learners recognise and approximate the pronunciation, rhythms and intonation patterns of more extended phrases and compound sentences. They use words with more complex syllable combinations and become more fluent and accurate in both spoken and written language production. They gain more control of grammatical and textual elements. They use the passé composé tense of verbs conjugated with avoir and être, recognise the form and function of reflexive verbs, and use elements such as possessive adjectives and object pronouns. They use expressive and descriptive language to talk about feelings and experiences. They develop understanding of the nature of both translation and interpretation, noticing the relationship between language, texts and culture. A balance is maintained between activities that focus on language forms and structures and those that involve communicative tasks, performances and experiences. Task characteristics and conditions are more complex and challenging. They involve collaborative as well as independent language planning and performance, and development and strategic use of language and cultural resources. Learners analyse text more critically, identifying how language choices reflect perspectives and shape meaning. At this level, learners are developing understanding of the relationship between language, culture and identity. They identify how meaning-making and representation in a different language involve interpretation and personal response as well as literal translation and factual reporting. They explore the reciprocal nature of intercultural communication: how moving between different languages and cultural systems impacts on the learner’s ways of thinking and behaving; and how successful communication requires flexibility, awareness and openness to alternative ways. They develop the capacity to ‘decentre’ from normative ways of thinking and communicating, to consider their own cultural practices through the eyes of others, and to communicate in interculturally appropriate ways.

Level of support

This stage of learning revolves around consolidation and progression. Learners need opportunities for new challenges and more independent learning experiences. Continued scaffolding, modelling and monitoring are required to support these challenges. Resources are provided and processes modelled for the development of more autonomous self-monitoring and reflecting strategies (such as online journalling, video documenting, and discussion forums). Continuing focused attention on grammatical and textual features supports learners’ development as text producers.

The role of English

French is increasingly used for classroom interactions and routines, for elements of task participation and for structured discussions. English continues to be used as the medium of some instruction, for substantive discussion, comparison, analysis and reflection. This allows learners to talk in more depth and detail about their experience of learning French and about their views on culture, identity and intercultural experience. English is the language of analysis, comparison and critique, encouraging discussion of concepts such as ‘diversity’, ‘flexibility’, ‘interculturality’ and ‘stereotypes’. It allows for discussion and debate appropriate to learners’ age and cognitive levels but beyond their linguistic capability in French.


Years 9 and 10 Content Descriptions

Socialising

Socialise and exchange views on local and global issues

[Key concepts: generation, environment, globalisation, relationships; Key processes: interacting, responding, explaining, comparing] (ACLFRC109 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Sustainability
  • using simple and compound sentences to structure arguments, and explain or justify a position in relation to personal and social issues such as les études, la santé, l’avenir, les passe-temps
  • initiating and sustaining conversation through active-listening strategies, turn-taking cues and verbal and non-verbal responses, for example, ah bon? pas vrai! et si on…?
  • using descriptive and expressive language to exchange views on global issues such as les médias sociaux, l’avenir des jeunes and la pollution, building topic-specific vocabulary and rhetorical strategies such as emphasis and repetition, for example, Au contraire! à mon avis…, je ne suis pas d’accord, après tout…, il faut le dire…, encore une fois..
    • Sustainability
  • contributing to online discussions with young people in French-speaking contexts, comparing aspects of school and home life, for example, les examens, le stress, les sports, l’étude des langues
Participate in collaborative projects that make connections between French language and culture and other curriculum areas

[Key concepts: concepts from other learning areas; Key processes: task planning and resourcing, cross-referencing] (ACLFRC110 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Sustainability
  • organising class displays that combine print and digital resources with demonstrations and performances around themes such as le 14 juillet, le voyage, la Fête de la Musique, la gastronomie francophone
  • finding connections between French language and culture and areas of the curriculum such as history, music, science, sport or the arts (for example, le ballet, Marcel Marceau, Zaz, Zinedine Zidane, le Tour de France, Louis Pasteur), and reporting on particular contributions or achievements
  • participating in visites virtuelles (for example, Le Musée du Quai Branly, le Tour de France, la Martinique, la Nouvelle Calédonie), sharing responsibility for individual elements of a report that highlights key features of the experience
  • designing action-oriented projects such as websites, posters or presentations which include images and expressions that invite concern or support for social or environmental issues, for example, les SDF, le commerce équitable, le développement durable
    • Sustainability
  • using mathematical language and processes in real or simulated transactions, for example, creating a virtual bureau de change, setting exchange rates with the euro, CHF, CFP, XAF; managing a budget for online shopping on French-language internet sites
Develop classroom language to manage shared learning experiences, monitor performance and discuss French language and culture learning

[Key concepts: task, outcome, performance, communication, culture; Key processes: discussing, commenting, interacting] (ACLFRC111 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • interacting in classroom activities and discussions to manage shared learning experiences, report on each other’s contributions and consider each other’s views, opinions and preferences, for example, c’est à qui? Moi, je vais mettre cette image là; qu’est que tu vas faire avec celle-là? Voilà — c’est fait. Qui va faire..? C’est bien réussi
  • planning performances or presentations to showcase French language and culture learning, for example, Si on préparait une photo-montage? Comment est-ce qu’on va présenter les images?
  • using evaluative and comparative language to discuss different learning resources such as textbooks, websites or electronic dictionaries, for example, ils sont utiles/intéressants/trop complexes; je préfère lire le texte moi-même...; je trouve mieux…
  • surveying or interviewing peers to report on shared progress, challenges and achievements, for example, je sais compter/écrire/communiquer en français; j’ai un bon accent; je parle assez couramment; j’aime bien les gestes ; je trouve meilleur...

Informing

Access and analyse information from different sources, identifying how culture and context influence the presentation of ideas

[Key concepts: information, representation, modality; Key processes: selecting, evaluating, interpreting, analysing] (ACLFRC112 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • examining information obtained from different sites and sources to compare how young people are represented in the media, for example, comparing letters to the editor about young people with postings on forums conducted by young people
  • listening to and viewing short informative texts such as documentaries or news reports, listing key words and points of information to be reused in own newsflash or roman photo, and considering how emphasis or perspective can reflect culture and context
  • conducting surveys or structured interviews with classmates or online French-speaking contacts, comparing opinions and perspectives on community or personal issues, and identifying social or cultural variations
  • listening to, reading or viewing excerpts from interviews with public figures such as politicians, sports stars, musicians or actors, noting how vocabulary, phrases or gestures are used to emphasise or clarify key points of information
Convey information on selected topics using different modes of presentation to suit different audiences

[Key concepts: content, audience, mode; Key processes: selecting, designing, presenting] (ACLFRC113 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • presenting information in different formats for different audiences, such as potential consumers or voters, matching language and structure to context and content, for example, digital images and catchy by-lines in advertisements, persuasive language in election speeches (C’est l’heure! Votez vert!)
  • explaining to others a procedure, game or practice, using simple language and supporting graphics, materials and gestures, for example, how to play la pétanque, cook an omelette, house-train a puppy, play an online game
  • creating a web page for young French travellers looking for work in Australia, indicating different regional employment possibilities and providing key points of information about each region, for example, les vendanges, au pair à la ferme, l’intérieur du pays, la côte
  • conveying information and ideas by aligning choice of language and text structure to topics and themes, for example, using emotive images and captions to highlight issues such as la faim or l’anti-discrimination, or rap rhythms and slogans to provoke reactions or to entertain

Creating

Respond to a range of traditional and contemporary texts, and compare themes and language style

[Key concepts: characterisation, themes, imagination, humour; Key processes: responding, comparing] (ACLFRC114 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • comparing treatment of particular themes, such as romance, adventure or family, in a range of texts created at different times, identifying changes in values and perspectives over time (for example, les fables, les contes, les dessins animés, la science fiction)
  • creating a shared database of imaginative, performative and expressive texts that they have enjoyed (such as songs, poems, cartoons and films), cross-referencing titles, genres, themes and values, and giving ratings and brief explanations for selections
  • comparing contemporary French and Australian music by reading music magazines, viewing video clips and listening to music stations, identifying similarities and differences in expression, themes and styles of performance
  • reviewing examples of French humour across different times and contexts (for example, le mime, les blagues, les comiques, les dessins animés), and considering similar changes in Australian expressions of humour according to era and context
Create imaginative texts to entertain, convey ideas and express emotions

[Key concepts: culture, expression, empathy, humour; Key processes: creating, performing, entertaining, reflecting] (ACLFRC115 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • creating an imaginary persona or avatar in a French-speaking fantasy world, incorporating communicative styles and social behaviours observed in French texts
  • creating a storyboard outline that transposes familiar characters to French-speaking contexts (for example, Harry Potter débarque à Paris), and providing a glossary of key vocabulary and expressions
  • composing and performing short songs for imagined occasions (for example, les anniversaires, le départ en voyages), experimenting with vocal and non-verbal expression
  • creating characters and contexts for simple unscripted interactions, such as explorers on an expedition or participants in a television reality show, providing sample descriptors and language, for example, courageux, dynamique, plein d’initative: du courage! Allez les gars! Timide, paresseux, toujours fatigué: pas encore! Ah non, c’est trop…

Translating

Consider the nature of translating and interpreting and the role of culture when transferring meaning from one language to another

[Key concepts: culture, translation, interpretation, meaning; Key processes: comparing, analysing, critical and cultural reading] (ACLFRC116 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • experimenting with the translation of popular French expressions or idioms (for example, être bien dans sa peau; ne pas être dans son assiette; revenons à nos moutons), and explaining the potential for misunderstanding
  • experimenting with various resources to assist in translation, including bilingual and monolingual dictionaries, electronic translators, encyclopaedias and other reference materials, for example, by comparing translations, back-translating and swapping useful references
  • analysing translations of familiar texts such as children’s stories or advertisements, considering the context in which they are produced and whether meaning is sometimes changed or lost in the process
  • finding examples of expressions in Australian English that do not translate easily into French (for example, ‘mad as a cut snake’, ‘the bush’, ‘a formal’, ‘schoolies’), explaining reasons for the lack of equivalence, why this may be the case and referencing sources of information that would help French learners understand or appreciate the context of use
  • viewing excerpts of French/English subtitled films and evaluating the effectiveness of the translations (literal translation, non-translation, adapted translation)
Create bilingual texts such as glossaries, footnotes or captions to interpret cultural aspects of texts

[Key concepts: representation, bilingualism, interpretation; Key processes: interpreting, explaining, comparing] (ACLFRC117 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • providing bilingual captions for images of French or Australian scenes to explain cultural references, for example, bush, beach or city images
  • creating websites or printed guides for intending international students to French or Australian schools, highlighting key terms and expressions associated with traditions, curricula, schedules or routines
  • providing vocabulary lists and annotated cultural explanations for French-speaking visitors to events such as Australian sports days, swimming carnivals or family barbecues, explaining elements such as abbreviated language or team barracking
  • creating a shared website with a group of French-speaking students, and posting news items, comments and questions in both French and English
  • creating parallel bilingual captions for a display or exhibition, and comparing how meanings are conveyed in each language

Reflecting

Interact with French speakers and resources, recognising that intercultural communication involves shared responsibility for meaning making

[Key concepts: frames, standpoints, reciprocity, reflection; Key processes: expressing, discussing, noticing, adjusting] (ACLFRC118 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • exploring the reciprocal nature of intercultural communication, the two-way process of noticing and responding to differences in perceptions, understandings or behaviours, for example, attitudes to interruptions, personal space and physical contact, and degree of formality or directness
  • using personal journals and discussions to reflect on critical incidents in the course of learning and using French, such as breakdowns or breakthroughs in communication, and discussing repair and recovery strategies and insights gained
  • discussing ways in which the experience of learning and using French challenges preconceptions, stereotypes or attitudes
  • exploring the process of ‘decentring’ from own linguistic and cultural standpoint and considering how ways of behaving and communicating might be perceived by people from different backgrounds
Consider and discuss own and others’ cultural identities, and how they both shape and are shaped by ways of communicating and thinking

[Key concepts: identity, culture, communication; Key processes: observing, reflecting, explaining] (ACLFRC119 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • examining the nature of identity, how it is fluid and dynamic and closely related to both language and culture
  • noticing how identity is expressed through languages spoken by people in various cultural contexts, including the range of languages spoken by classmates and family or community members
  • mapping their own linguistic and cultural profile, for example by creating a chart, timeline or web profile to highlight formative elements such as family languages, key relationships and intercultural experiences
  • reflecting on the experience of learning and using French, considering how it might add a further dimension to own sense of identity
  • developing a language for reflecting on language learning and intercultural experience, examining aspects that are unexpected, difficult or enjoyable

Systems of language

Recognise the regularities and irregularities of spoken French, and use pronunciation, rhythm and stress in increasingly complex ways

[Key concepts: liaisons, rhythm, intonation, pitch; Key processes: recognising, discriminating, imitating, producing] (ACLFRU120 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • recognising and reproducing rhythms in more complex sentences, using pausing and intonation to signal clause sequence and emphasis
  • using tone and intonation to indicate emphasis or emotion, for example, elle a fait quoi? Il est tellement doué!
  • using words and expressions with more complex syllable combinations (la magnitude, les augmentations, qu’est-ce que c’est que ça?), building fluency and accuracy in relation to pitch, stress and rhythm
  • understanding the function and patterns of use of liaisons and silent h forms in maintaining speech flow, for example, L’Hȏtel Splendide est situé au bord du lac; c’est en effet un hȏtel splendide!
  • recognising the role of pronunciation, rhythm and pace in creating effects and suggesting relationships in oral texts such as stories, poems, songs and conversations
Extend grammatical knowledge, including the forms and functions of reflexive verbs, verb moods and modality and the imperfect tense

[Key concepts: tense, mood, modality; Key processes: analysing, classifying, applying, explaining] (ACLFRU121 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • understanding additional negative forms such as ne…plus, ne…rien, ne…jamais, ne…que, ne…personne
  • understanding the function of comparative and superlative forms of adverbs and adjectives, for example, vite, plus vite, le plus vite; moins jolie, la moins jolie
  • extending knowledge of le passé composé, understanding that verbs conjugated with être require agreement of the past participle with the subject (elles sont parties hier soir), and that verbs conjugated with avoir require agreement between the past participle and preceding direct object (les fleurs que tu as achetées sont si belles)
  • understanding the function and use of relative pronouns (qui, que), emphatic pronouns (eux, elle), and direct and indirect object pronouns (la, lui, nous, leur)
  • using l’imparfait tense, understanding how to distinguish between a completed and a continuing action in the past (nous étions déjà au lit quand il est arrivé)
  • understanding the form and function of reflexive verbs (for example, se laver, se lever, se presenter), including the use of être and agreements in le passé composé
  • understanding the function of impersonal expressions such as il faut, on peut, on doit…
  • recognising how grammatical choices shade meaning and establish register, for example, use of tu or vous to distinguish relationship; use of nous to suggest inclusivity or shared identity; use of on to suggest distance
  • developing metalanguage to talk in French and English about word order, verb moods, tenses or agreements, for example, le passé composé, le verbe auxiliaire, les adjéctifs possessifs, l’accord du participe passé
Analyse and compose different types of texts using appropriate linguistic, textual and cultural elements

[Key concepts: register, tenor, cohesion; Key processes: analysing, composing, explaining] (ACLFRU122 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • identifying how grammatical choices, words and images combine in a text to achieve particular intentions and effects, for example, the positioning of the reader by the use of personal pronouns, imperative/interrogative verb moods and emotive language in advertisements
  • comparing French and English versions of texts with easily recognisable language features (for example, love songs, recipes or horoscopes), noticing differences or similarities in imagery or focus that might be culturally significant
  • interpreting, explaining and using textual conventions popular with young French speakers, for example, the use of contractions, abbreviations and acronyms in text messaging (bjr = bonjour; A+ = à plus; biz = bisous; 12C4 = un de ces quatre)

Language variation and change

Recognise that French is used in varying ways to achieve different purposes

[Key concepts: language modes, register, context; Key processes: noticing, comparing, analysing, explaining] (ACLFRU123 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • comparing spoken and written texts such as apologies or invitations to identify how differences in grammar and text features determine the nature of interactions, for example, formal or informal (je t’invite! Nous serions très heureux de vous accueillir chez nous)
  • observing forms of communication in different situations, and explaining how elements such as body language and use of personal space or silence contribute to the nature of the interaction and reflect status or relationship
  • examining the power of language to influence actions and beliefs (for example, analysing the wording of appels de secours d’urgence: nous sommes de tout cœur avec les communautés dévastées…), and noticing the use of grammatical choices to include or exclude, for example, vous les autres… nous les jeunes…
  • recognising how diversity of expression and language forms reflects the diversity of individual and community perspectives and experiences
Examine the nature of language change in response to changing cultural conditions

[Key concepts: globalisation, intercultural contact, popular culture; Key processes: reflecting, analysing, comparing, explaining] (ACLFRU124 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • identifying factors involved in language change and adaptation, for example by creating flowcharts or diagrams using captions such as la mondialisation, l’immigration, le multiculturalisme, les médias, les informations
  • finding examples of cross-cultural influences between French, English and Australian-English cultural expressions, art forms and vocabulary, for example, young musicians in France studying le didgeridoo
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
  • considering the concept of ‘ecology’ in relation to French and other languages; that is, the interaction of the language with constantly changing environments due to globalisation, technology, language shifts and exchange
  • understanding that languages increasingly blend to create new forms and functions, for example by comparing traditional creole languages in English-speaking and francophone communities
Understand the symbolic nature of language in local and global contexts

[Key concepts: power, symbolism, culture; Key processes: exploring issues, identifying, analysing, comparing] (ACLFRU125 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
  • identifying the function and power of cultural expressions such as stories, symbols, icons and anthems, for example, le tricolore, la Marseillaise, le fleur de lys, the Dreamtime, Aboriginal and Australian flags
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
  • considering how language marks respect, values and attitudes, and includes and excludes, for example, the language of law and medicine, the (changing) gendered nature of some professional titles in French (un médecin, un chef, une professeure), and access to community information for second language speakers
  • reflecting on the power of language in relation to own and others’ experience, for example, winning an argument or working out the meaning of unfamiliar French words; being locked out of conversations, or being a newcomer or an outsider in a social group

Role of language and culture

Explore the dynamic nature of the relationship between language, culture and communication and how it impacts on attitudes and beliefs

[Key concepts: culture, meaning, change; Key processes: reflecting, analysing, comparing] (ACLFRU126 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • examining how changes to the French language reflect changes in some cultural practices and attitudes, for example, le fastfood, la pub/le pub, Madame le Directeur
  • sharing ideas about how culture ‘works’ as a combination of beliefs, values and practices, and examining own personal and community cultural frames of reference and how and why these change over time
  • using personal journals and group discussions to reflect on how learning French has impacted on own assumptions about French language, culture or identity
  • considering how the experience of learning a new language has impacted on awareness of own communicative and cultural behaviours and of how these may be interpreted by others
  • developing language for thinking and talking about cultural representation and expression, for example, ‘perspectives’, ‘values’, ‘images’, ‘stereotypes’, ‘inclusions’ and ‘exclusions’

Years 9 and 10 Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 10, students use written and spoken French to socialise with peers, teachers and other French speakers in local contexts and online environments. They communicate about immediate and personal interests and involvements (such as family, friends, interests), and some broader social and cultural issues (such as health, social media, international experience, the environment). They approximate rhythms and intonation patterns of extended and compound sentences, using syllable combinations, and building fluency and accuracy in pronunciation, pitch and stress. They use the passé composé tense of regular verbs with avoir and être, noticing that the participe passé form of verbs with être involves gender and number agreement. They identify the form and function of reflexive verbs (such as se laver, se lever) and use appropriate forms of possessive adjectives in own language production. They locate, interpret and analyse information from different print, digital and community sources, and communicate information, ideas and views in a range of contexts using different modes of presentation. They use expressive and descriptive vocabulary to talk about feelings and experiences. They create imaginative and performative texts for a range of purposes, such as entertaining or persuading. They use French to narrate and describe, matching modes of presentation to context and intended audience. They create bilingual texts (such as guides, event commentaries, cultural glossaries), and interpret observed interactions in terms of cultural practices and comparisons.

Students identify differences between spoken and written forms of French, comparing these with English and other known languages. They identify the importance of non-verbal elements of communication, such as facial expressions, gestures and intonation. They make distinctions between familiar text types, such as greetings, instructions and menus, commenting on differences in language features and text structures. They use metalanguage for talking about language (such as formal and informal language, body language) and for reflecting on the experience of French language and culture learning. They identify relationships between parts of words (such as suffixes, prefixes) and stems of words (such as préparer, préparation; le marché, le supermarché, l’hypermarché). Students identify the validity of different perspectives, and make comparisons across languages and cultures, drawing from texts which relate to familiar routines and daily life (for example, la vie scolaire, la famille, les courses, les loisirs, la cuisine). They explain to others French terms and expressions that reflect cultural practices (such as bon appétit, bonne fête). They reflect on their own cultural identity in light of their experience of learning French, discussing how their ideas and ways of communicating are influenced by their membership of cultural groups.


Years 9 and 10 Work Sample Portfolios