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Context statement

The place of the French language and culture in Australia and in the world
French is a major world language, spoken as the first language in more than two dozen countries on five continents and as an official language in 33 countries.

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PDF documents

Resources and support materials for the Australian Curriculum: Languages - French are available as PDF documents. 
Languages - French: Sequence of content
Languages - French: Sequence of Achievement - F-10 Sequence
Languages - French: Sequence of …

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Years 7 and 8

Years 7 and 8 Band Description

The nature of the learners

Students are beginning their study of French and typically have had little prior exposure to the language and associated cultures. Many will have learnt an additional language in primary school, some have proficiency in different home languages and bring existing language learning strategies and intercultural awareness to the new experience of learning French. Students’ textual knowledge developed through English literacy learning supports the development of literacy in French. Skills in analysing, comparing and reflecting on language and culture in both languages are mutually supportive. Students may need encouragement to take risks in learning a new language at this stage of social development and to consider issues of how the experience impacts on the sense of ‘norms’ associated with their first language and culture.

French language learning and use

Learners are encouraged to listen to, speak, read and write French in a range of interactions with the teacher and each other. They use the language for interactions and transactions, for practising language forms, for developing cultural knowledge and for intercultural exchange. There is code mixing and code switching, as learners use all available resources to make meaning and express themselves. They use English when they need to, with teachers modelling back the French that would have served the required purpose. Rich and varied language input characterises this first level of learning, supported by the use of gestures, vocal and facial expression, and concrete materials. Learners experiment with sounds, intonation patterns and body language, using high-frequency words and expressions, gradually broadening their range of language functions. They notice how French is used differently in different contexts and how French speakers communicate in ways that may be different to their own. As they adjust language use to suit different purposes, contexts and situations, they notice how culture shapes language. Learners work collaboratively and independently. They pool language knowledge and resources, plan, problem-solve, monitor and reflect. They make cross-curricular connections and explore intercultural perspectives. They focus on the different systems (grammar, vocabulary, sounds) that structure language use, and reflect on their experience as French language learners and users. They gradually build a vocabulary and grammatical base that allows them to compose and present different kinds of simple texts.

Contexts of interaction

The French classroom is the primary context for language and culture experience, with ICT resources and community links providing access to additional resources and experiences. Learners may communicate with peers in France or other francophone contexts using teacher-guided ICT resources such as wikis, emails or online chat. They may also access French-language events or resources in the wider community, such as interschool activities, film festivals or cultural performances.

Texts and resources

Learners work with a range of texts designed for language learning, such as textbooks, audio recordings, teacher-generated materials and online resources. They also use materials designed for French students in different contexts (for example, blogs, newsletters, advertisements, magazines, video clips and apps). Authentic texts from different sources provide opportunities for discussion and analysis of the relationship between communication and culture.

Features of French language use

Students become familiar with the sounds of French, including pronunciation, rhythm, pitch and stress. They recognise similarities with many English words, noting differences in pronunciation (attention, menu). They approximate the pronunciation and phrasing of single words and short phrases, including vowel sounds such as -eau, -on, -ère and u, and unfamiliar consonants such as r and soft g. They understand and apply elements of French grammar such as subject-verb-object word order, simple verb forms, gender and number agreement of nouns and adjectives, pronouns and prepositions. Students understand that language is organised as text, and that texts use different structures and language features to achieve different purposes. They create their own texts, mainly using the present tense of regular and common irregular verbs, enriched by the use of adjectives and adverbs. They understand that language use reflects and shapes values and attitudes, and explore how language choices determine how people, events or circumstances are represented.

Level of support

Learning at this level is supported by rich and varied language input and the provision of experiences that are challenging but achievable. Support includes scaffolding, modelling and monitoring; explicit instruction and feedback; structured opportunities for understanding and practising new language; and the chance to revisit, recycle and review. Learners need access to a range of engaging and accessible support resources and materials, including print and digital texts, audio recordings, word banks, graphic organisers and dictionaries.

The role of English

Learners are supported to use French as much as possible for classroom routines and interactions, structured learning tasks, and language experimentation and practice. English is used for discussion, clarification, explanation, analysis and reflection. Learners develop a metalanguage for thinking and talking about language, culture and identity, and about the experience of learning and using French.


Years 7 and 8 Content Descriptions

Socialising

Interact with peers and teacher to exchange information and opinions, talk about self, family, friends and interests, and express feelings, likes and dislikes

[Key concepts: family, friendship, home; Key processes: interacting, describing] (ACLFRC091 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • exchanging greetings, wishes and thanks, adjusting language to suit the situation, for example, Bonjour, la classe! Salut, Marianne, ça va? Bonsoir, Madame Legrand, comment allez-vous? Bonne fête, Solange! Merci bien, Maman
  • introducing and describing self and others, for example, je m’appelle Marc; je te présente mon oncle; voici ma petite sœur, Eliane; je m’appelle Sophie, j’ai les yeux bleus, j’aime les sports
  • using present tense high-frequency verbs such as être, avoir and aimer with adjectives, adverbs and simple formulaic expressions to talk about self and others, for example, je te présente mon copain, Henri, il est drôle! elle est si douée! Nous voici — la famille Mercier!
  • comparing routines, interests and leisure activities, using language associated with time, frequency and location, for example, lundi après-midi, je fais du foot; le weekend, je joue aux jeux vidéos; l’hiver, je fais du ski; l’été, on va souvent à la plage
  • stating likes, dislikes and preferences, for example, j’aime bien le fromage mais je n’aime pas le yaourt; je déteste les prunes mais j’adore les pruneaux
Participate in collaborative activities such as performances and presentations that involve planning, making arrangements, transacting and negotiating

[Key concepts: tasks, performance, transaction, collaborative learning; Key processes: planning and managing tasks, acting] (ACLFRC092 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • collaboratively creating computer-generated designs such as a virtual ideal home or leisure centre, negotiating with each other in relation to different elements and priorities, for example, Moi, je voudrais une salle média immense…, ah non, moi je préfère un grand jardin
  • managing an allocated budget for online shopping, deciding on selected items and explaining choices, for example, le 2ème à moitié prix; 3CD à 15 €
  • creating displays, presentations or performances for family, friends or school community to showcase French learning
  • organising class events such as a vide-grenier/marché aux puces, preparing labels and prices, using transactional language (for example, c’est combien? un très bon prix, vente flash! non, c’est trop cher… une échange?...), and using imperative, declarative and interrogative verb forms to buy, sell or swap items
  • issuing, accepting and declining invitations, adjusting language to suit formal or informal contexts, for example, es-tu libre samedi prochain? je t’invite; je ne suis pas libre - c’est possible dimanche? j’ai le grand plaisir de vous inviter…
  • organising social or sports events, and planning location, date and time (for example, rendez-vous au Stade Central à midi; 19 h chez ma cousine; n’oublie pas ton sac de couchage), using aller + infinitive forms of verbs such as venir, arriver, partir and commencer, for example, nous allons partir à sept heures
  • making arrangements to cater for events such as celebrations or outings through spoken and written texts such as lists, phone calls, letters or emails, and estimating quantities, numbers and prices, for example, il me faut…, une trentaine de… ça coûte combien?
Participate in classroom routines and interactions by following instructions, asking and answering questions, and requesting help or permission

[Key concepts: roles, routines, interaction patterns; Key processes: participating, interacting, contributing, responding] (ACLFRC093 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • asking and answering questions (for example, qu’est-ce que c’est? c’est… ce sont…), and requesting clarification or permission, for example, j’ai une question, comment dit-on…? comment ça s’écrit…?
  • requesting information, explanation or help, for example, pouvez-vous répéter plus lentement s’il vous plaît? qu’est-ce que cela veut dire? je peux recommencer?
  • responding to directions or requests, for example, cliquez sur l’image du chȃteau, choisissez la forme négative
  • discussing aspects of school and social life and responding to each other’s contributions, for example, c’est génial! c’est une bonne idée; ah non, je ne suis pas d’accord
  • using active-listening and turn-taking strategies, for example, et toi, tu es d’accord?… à moi maintenant!

Informing

Locate factual information from a range of texts and resources and use the information in new ways

[Key concepts: concepts from learning areas such as health or environmental studies; Key processes: researching, reading/listening, ordering, classifying] (ACLFRC094 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • collecting vocabulary and expressions from a range of informative texts such as posters, websites, brochures or menus for use in own short reports on topics such as les voyages, manger sain, les médias
  • listening for key points of information in short, spoken/recorded texts such as phone messages or announcements, and representing the information in note form to communicate to others
  • gathering information about places, people or events in francophone contexts and cultures, and using it to build timelines, itineraries or profiles
  • obtaining, classifying and summarising data collected from class surveys or web searches on topics such as favourite books, music, apps, films or social media
  • explaining and sequencing actions or events from texts such as magazine articles or sports reports, using conjunctions and adverbs related to time, for example, puis, d’abord, ensuite, finalement
Present information and ideas relating to social worlds and natural environments in spoken, written and digital forms

[Key concepts: community, traditions, environment; Key processes: composing, presenting, informing] (ACLFRC095 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • creating texts to share with a French-speaking audience such as a video or web page to capture and interpret aspects of their personal and social worlds, for example, ‘A day in our life in middle school’; les copains; mon quartier; le weekend
  • creating resources such as posters, pamphlets, websites or journals to present topics related to lifestyles, events or causes, for example, Le Jour de la Terre, Le Clean-Up Day
  • using different modes of presentation to profile significant events, characters or places related to French culture, history or environment
  • describing aspects of their own lifestyles that may interest young learners of their own age in French-speaking environments, for example, surf lifesaving, school camps or excursions, music events

Creating

Engage with imaginative and creative texts such as stories, poems, songs or cartoons, comparing favourite elements, and discussing characters, events, themes and effects

[Key concepts: imagination, creativity, character, expression; Key processes: participating, responding, evaluating] (ACLFRC096 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • responding to questions about characters or events in different types of imaginative texts, and listing and using associated key words or expressions
  • interacting with texts such as stories, poems, songs or cartoons, using modelled and scaffolded language to express opinions, for example, trop triste, si amusant, affreux; pour moi les images…; personnellement, je préfère…
  • noticing and engaging with rhythm, intonation and imagery used to build mood and meaning in poems, songs and performances, and experimenting with language, voice and actions to create similar effects in own re-enactments
  • listening to or viewing texts such as songs, raps or film and video clips, and noticing ideas and comparing aspects that may be similar or different across cultures
Reinterpret or create own shared texts, experimenting with expressive and performance genres, and creating moods and effects suitable for different audiences

[Key concepts: adaptation, mode, genre, performance; Key processes: interpreting, creating, experimenting, presenting] (ACLFRC097 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • creating short performances for younger learners, incorporating vocal and expressive elements of language in ways that will engage young children, for example, animal sounds (ouah ouah, cocorico, meuh, cui-cui, coin, coin)
  • creating and performing interactions between characters in scaffolded scenarios that allow for some unscripted language production and expression of emotion
  • using digital resources such as Sock Puppets or Cartoon Story Maker to create imaginary characters and situations associated with home or school contexts
  • composing and performing modified or simplified versions of familiar texts that feature repetitive and evocative language, for example, Page d’écriture, Prévert
  • inventing a new character, story twist or event in a familiar text such as Astérix or Tintin

Translating

Translate short texts from French to English and vice versa, noticing which words or phrases translate easily and which do not

[Key concepts: translation, equivalence; Key processes: comparing, translating, interpreting, explaining] (ACLFRC098 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • translating short personal texts such as letters, emails or conversations, identifying words and phrases that can be translated literally (for example, la maison, le ciel, les enfants, Bonjour, mon ami) and those that need to be translated for meaning, for example, il fait beau! A tout à l’heure! courage!
  • translating public signs or notices (for example, sens unique, chaussée deformée, défense de fumer), comparing own versions with others’ and considering reasons for any differences
  • using bilingual dictionaries and electronic translation tools, taking into account issues such as alternative or multiple meanings of words and the importance of context when making meaning, for example, la fille, le bureau, l’histoire, la vue
  • translating headlines, captions and short reports in texts produced for young readers (for example, Wapiti, Okapi, Julie), identifying and explaining words or expressions that require interpretation rather than translation
  • translating and explaining the meaning of words or expressions associated with celebrations in French-speaking regions of the world (for example, le poisson d’avril, la bûche de Noël, le Ramadan, Aïd el-Fitre, la Fête de la Musique, la Toussaint), and considering how they reflect significant cultural experience
Create bilingual texts and resources such as learning support materials, games or posters, deciding how to deal with elements that cannot be readily translated

[Key concepts: equivalence, context, meaning; Key processes: translating, interpreting, explaining] (ACLFRC099 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • creating bilingual resources such as glossaries, word banks or personal French–English dictionaries, including explanations of some idioms and expressions
  • creating bilingual texts for the school or local community (for example, posters, library displays or contributions to online forums), considering how to represent meaning for different audiences
  • creating bilingual texts for specific audiences, for example, rhymes, stories or songs for younger learners of French, invitations to a class event, or posters for a performance
  • using dictionaries and electronic translation tools to create bilingual texts such as menus, schedules or captions for photo montages, and making decisions in relation to language, audience and cultural perspectives
  • designing and maintaining a bilingual website with a sister-school or contact group of English learners in a French-speaking community, making choices about when to use French or English depending on the context, topic and nature of the interaction

Reflecting

Engage with French speakers and resources, noticing how interaction involves culture as well as language

[Key concepts: awareness, interpretation, cultural frames, intercultural exchange; Key processes: noticing, reflecting, responding] (ACLFRC100 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • reflecting on choices made when using French to interact with others, and considering the relationship between language, culture and behaviour, for example, using names or titles and familiar or formal terms of address (Salut, Leila, ça va? Bonjour, Madame Michou, comment allez-vous?)
  • interacting with French speakers online, noticing and responding to expressions or behaviours that are unfamiliar, for example, use of gestures, exclamations, or sigles such as MDR (mort de rire)
  • sharing ideas about the experience of learning and using French, including any perceived changes in levels of confidence, or in attitudes towards and understanding of culture and intercultural communication
  • observing interactions between French speakers in different contexts, noticing and recording elements that reflect cultural attitudes or behaviours, for example, language associated with politeness or emotion (je vous en prie, je suis désolé)
  • participating in guided discussion of the nature and role of ‘culture’ and its relationship with language, with reference to French, English and other known languages
Notice own and others’ ways of expressing identity, and consider the relationship between language, culture and identity

[Key concepts: communication, identity; Key processes: noticing, reflecting, comparing, adjusting] (ACLFRC101 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • talking about own identities in terms of cultural background and personal and social experience, using declarative and descriptive statements, for example, je suis australien d’origine italienne; je parle vietnamien et anglais; je suis membre de l’équipe…
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • preparing a class profile to exchange with French-speaking students, showing cultural backgrounds, languages used in the home, interests and values, and using resources such as photos, captions, quotes and symbols
  • considering the impact of stereotypes on how texts are understood and intercultural experiences interpreted
  • sharing personal reactions and feelings when using French, using prompts such as: Am I the same ‘me’ when speaking French? Does my identity change? How do I feel when…?
  • observing others’ ways of communicating, identifying elements of language or behaviour that might be unfamiliar to people from different cultures or communities, for example, ways of addressing people and expressing wishes, rituals associated with school sports, and the use of body language

Systems of language

Recognise and use features of the French sound system, including pitch, rhythm, stress and intonation

[Key concepts: pronunciation, intonation; Key processes: listening, distinguishing, imitating, reading aloud] (ACLFRU102 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • developing awareness of French sounds, rhythms and intonation patterns, including those with no English equivalents, for example, -u (tu), -r (très vite) and -ion (attention)
  • becoming familiar with the vowel system in French, including nasalised vowels such as plein, bon, and semi-vowels such as famille, oui
  • distinguishing vowel sounds (for example by recognising distinctions between nasal vowel sounds such as cinq, sympa, manger, entre, dont, des bonbons), and experimenting with pronunciation of consonant–vowel combinations, for example by using virelangues such as un chasseur sachant chasser…, six cent six saucissons suisses…
  • using the French alphabet for spelling out names or expressions, noticing similarities and differences to English and using correct terminology for accents (accent aigu, accent cédille, accent circonflexe)
  • recognising differences in intonation and rhythm between statements, questions and commands (Vous écoutez la chanson. Vous écoutez la chanson? Ecoutez la chanson!)
  • using appropriate intonation for common fillers, interjections and responses such as hein?, bon, beh…, n’est-ce pas? Oh là là!, Aïe!, Youpi! Ça alors…
Understand and use elements of the French grammatical system, including word order, gender and number variation, and present and compound forms of regular and some irregular verbs

[Key concepts: grammar, gender, number; Key processes: noticing, applying, explaining] (ACLFRU103 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • using and understanding nouns as core elements of sentence structure
  • using definite and indefinite articles (le, la, l’, les; un, une, des)
  • marking plural forms (le chien/les chiens, une femme/des femmes), including some irregular plural forms (l’œil/les yeux, le nez/les nez)
  • understanding and using the three main conjugations for present tense regular verbs -er, -ir and -re, and the irregular present tense conjugations of the verbs être, avoir, aller and faire
  • understanding that while some adjectives in French follow the noun (un élève intelligent, un match extraordinaire), some precede the noun (une bonne étudiante, une grande maison)
  • understanding that adjectives agree in number and gender with the noun (des élèves intelligents, de bonnes étudiantes) and that des changes to de if the adjective precedes the noun
  • understanding the form and function of subject pronouns je, tu, il, elle, nous, vous, ils and elles, how they determine verb conjugations and substitute for noun subjects (voila le frère de Michel; il est beau, n’est-ce pas?)
  • recognising and using locative prepositions à, en, au, aux and dans when describing where people live (Jean-François habite à Montréal au Canada, ma copine Juliette habite aux Phlippines, la famille Maréchal habite dans une ferme)
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • using the negative ne…pas in simple statements, questions and commands (je n’aime pas l’histoire, tu n’aimes pas le bifteck? ne recommence pas!), recognising substitution of the indefinite article with de in negative sentences (Non, je n’ai pas de frère. J’ai une sœur)
  • understanding three ways of forming a question: a simple declarative sentence with rising intonation (tu as un animal chez toi?), inverting the verb form (as-tu un animal chez toi?), and using est-ce que before a declarative sentence (est-ce que tu as un animal chez toi?)
  • gaining awareness of simple and compound tenses, using le passé composé to recount events that occurred in the past and le futur proche to describe immediate future events (il a regardé la télé, il va regarder la télé)
  • expressing ownership through the use of singular and plural possessive adjectives (mes yeux, ses cheveux, ta mère, ses copains)
  • using the imperative verb mood (mes enfants, soyez sages! va demander à ta mère)
  • recognising the function of irregular verbs such as avoir, être and faire in expressions such as avoir faim, avoir 13 ans and faire beau and as auxiliary verb forms (je suis arrivé, nous avons mangé)
  • recognising the functions of elements such as prefixes and suffixes (désagréable, la camionette, la réorganization) and how word patterns and clusters connect (triste, la tristesse; le marché, le marchand, la marchandise)
  • building metalanguage to talk about grammar and vocabulary (for example, les formes négatives, interrogatives, le futur proche, masculin, féminin, singulier, pluriel), and comparing with equivalent English terms
Recognise and use features of common spoken, written and multimodal texts, and compare with features of similar texts in English

[Key concepts: genre, mode, tenor, audience, language features; Key processes: noticing, analysing, comparing] (ACLFRU104 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • identifying the purpose, intended audience and key language features of familiar texts such as road signs, instructions or postcards, for example, Grosses bises! Défense de fumer; stationnement interdit
  • listening, viewing and reading for gist, context and purpose, drawing on knowledge of types of text, context and language features to predict and confirm meaning, for example, the use of imperative verb forms and specialised vocabulary in an in-flight safety demonstration (en préparation pour le décollage, le gilet de sauvetage, respirez normalement, gardez votre ceinture attaché…)
  • identifying elements of common types of text (le courriel, la météo, les slogans), and explaining relationships between language, structure and textual purpose
  • building understanding of text features through activities such as ‘genre substitution’; that is, transferring typical features from one genre to a different one, for example, a greeting that sounds like an announcement (Attention, Madame, comment-allez vous!), or a weather report that reads like a recipe (Un litre de pluie, un peu de vent, six nuages…)
  • understanding how to create textual cohesion, using elements such as conjunctions or causal phrases to sequence and link ideas and maintain the flow of expression, for example, donc, mais, à propos de, pendant, si, grace à, à cause de…

Language variation and change

Recognise that French language use varies according to context, situation and relationship

[Key concepts: variation, context, relationship; Key processes: noticing, analysing, explaining] (ACLFRU105 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social Capability
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • noticing that French is used differently in different situations and for different relationships, for example, casual conversation between friends, polite interactions between strangers in shops, and respectful/authoritative exchanges between teachers and students
  • comparing language use and other aspects of communication in informal exchanges (for example, un match de football — allez, allez!) and in formal communication, for example, Soyez les bienvenus à notre école
  • collecting and analysing samples of language from texts such as video clips or print/electronic forms of communication to explore differences in communicative style and expression between social groups such as les adolescents, les profs or les tout-petits
Understand the dynamic nature of French and other languages

[Key concepts: language contact, word borrowing, globalisation; Key processes: observing, identifying, classifying] (ACLFRU106 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
  • understanding that languages and cultures change continuously due to contact with each other and in response to new ideas and developments in communications and technology (la mondialisation)
  • recognising that the French language continuously borrows and adapts words and expressions from other languages, including English, for example, stop! le football, le sketch, le clown; le sushi, l’origami
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
  • recognising that many French words are used in English and in other languages (for example, croissant, menu, ballet, chef, chauffeur), and noticing the different vocabulary areas that these words tend to belong to (such as terms relating to food and fashion) and considering possible reasons for this
  • collecting French words used in English (for example, le restaurant, le menu, le chauffeur, le ballet, la pirouette), and comparing how they are pronounced by French or English speakers
  • understanding that some languages are growing and adapting, while others (such as indigenous languages across the world) are endangered, disappearing or reviving, or blending with stronger languages
Recognise that French is both a local and a global language

[Key concepts: first language, global language, dialects, creoles, accents; Key processes: mapping, comparing, distinguishing] (ACLFRU107 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • recognising that French is an important world language spoken with a variety of accents and dialects in many regions of the world as well as in France, for example, le Québec, le Sénégal, le Maroc, La Suisse, La Nouvelle Calédonie
  • understanding that French serves different functions within France and in other regions of the world, including Australia, for example, as a langue nationale, officielle, de communauté, diplomatique and culturelle
  • mapping and comparing variations in forms and expressions of French language in different geographical contexts, for example, les langues kanakes de la Nouvelle Calédonie, les langues bretonnes de la Bretagne, la créole de la Guadaloupe
  • comparing diversity in accents, dialects and vocabulary in French-speaking communities with similar diversity in the use of English within and beyond Australia

Role of language and culture

Explore the relationship between language and culture

[Key concepts: culture, language, meaning; Key processes: analysing, explaining, defining] (ACLFRU108 - Scootle )

  • Literacy
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Intercultural Understanding
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
  • exploring how language and culture influence each other, for example, French terms of address that reflect respect and status such as Madame la Directrice and Monsieur le Président; diverse cuisines and food-related terms and expressions that reflect cultural diversity in contemporary France or Australia
  • investigating connections between language and significant cultural values or practices in French, English and other languages, for example, la Marianne; la patrie; la laïcité; Reconciliation, Aussie Rules, ‘fair go’
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures
  • noticing how people think and talk about themselves and others, for example, comparing ways of addressing and thinking about older people or strangers
  • creating a gift pack of symbols and expressions to introduce French students to Australian languages and cultures, and explaining the reasons for particular choices
  • developing language to analyse and explain the nature of the language–culture relationship, using terms such as ‘meaning’, ‘perspective’, ‘values’, ‘assumptions’ and ‘difference’
  • reflecting on own tastes, interests and language use that have been shaped by intercultural influences, for example, Japanese manga or anime, or American fashion, music and dance
    • Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia

Years 7 and 8 Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 8, students use French to interact with each other, teachers and online French-speaking contacts, to exchange information, opinions, experiences, thoughts and feelings about themselves, their families and friends. They initiate and sustain conversation by using active-listening skills and responding to others’ contributions (for example, c’est vrai ...; ah oui, en effet ...; pas possible!). They respond to familiar questions and directions (such as Qu’est-ce que c’est? Qui est-ce? Posez la question à ...), and request help or clarification (for example, Pardon? Pourquoi? Peux-tu répéter?). They approximate French sound patterns, intonation and rhythms, including novel elements of pronunciation such as -r, -u and -ille. They use the present tense and present + infinitive form to make statements and ask questions about self, peers, family and interests (for example, je suis italien-australien; j’habite à Cairns; j’ai une sœur et deux frères; j’aime chanter; et toi?). They locate factual information from a range of texts and use non-verbal, visual and contextual cues to help make meaning. They describe familiar objects, contexts and experiences (such as la maison, le quartier, l’école), using appropriate subject-verb and noun-adjective gender and number agreements and vocabulary to describe appearance (for example, grand, petit, belle, bizarre), character (for example, sympa, compliqué) and quantity (for example, les numéros, beaucoup de ...). They use modelled sentence structures, formulaic expressions and high-frequency vocabulary to create texts such as captions, emails, posters or short narratives and presentations. They use conjunctions and connectives (such as puis, ensuite and mais), and prepositions of place and time (such as sous, sur, devant, après and avant) to build cohesion and extend sentence structure. They translate short texts and explain French gestures, expressions or signs to friends and family. They provide examples of how languages do not always translate directly, and how interpreting and translating involve meaning (for example, values, ideas, attitudes) as well as parts of speech (such as nouns, verbs, adverbs). They adjust language use to suit contexts and situations (for example, use of tu or vous, different forms of address), and respond in culturally appropriate ways to interactions with French speakers or resources.

Students provide examples of the dynamic nature of contact between languages and cultures in the contemporary world. They identify the significance of French as a world language and the distribution of communities of French speakers in different countries and regions. They give examples of similarities between French and English (for example, the same alphabet and basic sentence structure, many words in common), and some differences (such as pronunciation and intonation patterns, non-verbal language, grammatical gender forms and politeness protocols). They identify French words used in English (such as ‘menu’, ‘mousse’), English words used in French (such as le weekend, le football), and explain how languages and cultures influence and interact with each other (technology, globalisation, popular culture). They know that French has its own rules for pronunciation, grammar and non-verbal communication and that they need to adjust language to suit different situations and relationships (for example, formal and informal language, different text types). They use metalanguage to explain features of language, texts and grammar, making connections with terms such as ‘verb’, ‘adjective’ and ‘tense’ that are used in English learning, and incorporating new concepts such as grammatical gender for talking about French. Students give examples of how languages are connected with cultures, and of how French language reflects ways of behaving and thinking as does their own language.


Years 7 and 8 Work Sample Portfolios