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Rationale

In a world that is increasingly culturally diverse and dynamically interconnected, it is important that students come to understand their world, past and present, and develop a capacity to respond to challenges, now and in the future, in innovative, informed, personal and collective ways.

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Aims

The F–6/7 Australian Curriculum for Humanities and Social Sciences aims to ensure that students develop:

a sense of wonder, curiosity and respect about places, people, cultures and systems throughout the world, past and present, and an interest in and enjoyment of the study of these phenomena

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Structure

The Australian Curriculum: Humanities and Social Sciences may be implemented as a combined F–6 program or as an F–7 program. The F–6/7 curriculum is organised into two interrelated strands: knowledge and understanding and inquiry and skills.

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PDF documents

Resources and support materials for the Australian Curriculum: Humanities and Social Sciences F-6/7 are available as PDF documents.
F-6/7 HASS - Combined Sequence of Content
F-6/7 HASS - Combined Sequence of Achievement

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Glossary

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Foundation Year

Foundation Year Level Description

My personal world

The Foundation curriculum focuses on developing students’ understanding of their personal worlds, including their personal and family histories and the places they and their families live in and belong to. The emphasis is on the student’s own history and their own place. They explore why places are special to them and others. As students explore the people and features of their social and physical worlds, they examine representations of place and sources, which may include stories from family members and from different cultures. They may also study places of similar size that are familiar to them or that they are curious about, coming to see how people feel about and look after places. Learning about their own heritage and their own place contributes to students’ sense of identity and belonging, beginning the idea of active citizenship.

The content provides opportunities for students to begin to develop humanities and social sciences understanding through key concepts including significance, continuity and change, place and space and perspectives. These concepts may provide a focus for inquiries and be investigated across sub-strands or within a particular sub-strand context.

The content at this year level is organised into two strands: knowledge and understanding, and inquiry and skills. The knowledge and understanding strand draws from two sub-strands: history and geography. These strands (knowledge and understanding, and inquiry and skills) are interrelated and have been developed to be taught in an integrated way, which may include integrating with content from the sub-strands and from other learning areas, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. The order and detail in which they are taught are programming decisions.

Inquiry Questions

A framework for developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills is provided by inquiry questions. The following inquiry questions allow for connections to be made across the sub-strands and may be used or adapted to suit local contexts: inquiry questions are also provided for each sub-strand that may enable connections within the humanities and social sciences learning area or across other learning areas.

  • Who am I, where do I live and who came before me?
  • Why are some places and events special and how do we know?

Foundation Year Content Descriptions

Questioning

Pose questions about past and present objects, people, places and events (ACHASSI001 - Scootle )
  • posing questions about family and places having explored sources relating to their own life (for example, sources such as family interviews, photographs, stories, film, classmates’ paintings, excursions to places)
  • inquiring about the lives, places and events of family members and inquiring about their own history (for example, asking the questions ‘How old was I?’ ‘Where was I?’ and ‘What was I doing?’ in response to family photographs)
  • posing questions about artefacts of the past (for example, ‘Is it old or new?’, ‘What was it used for?’) and representations of places (for example, ‘Where is this place?’, ‘What does this show?’ and ‘What is that?’)
  • asking questions about the place they are in after being encouraged to observe it using different senses

Researching

Collect data and information from observations and identify information and data from sources provided (ACHASSI002 - Scootle )
  • exploring sources (for example, pictures, photographs, story books, artefacts, excursions to places, family interviews) to gain information about the past
  • listening to stories from oral, audiovisual and other sources to find information about family, friends, celebrations, places and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures
  • observing the features of a special place (for example, their bedroom, under a tree) or local place (such as a beach, farm or ceremony site) and recording these observations
Sort and record information and data, including location, in tables and on plans and labelled maps (ACHASSI003 - Scootle )
  • displaying sources related to an investigation (for example, historical sources such as pictures, photographs, family mementoes and geographic sources such as items collected in the field, sketches of observations, measurements)
  • contributing information to shared records of places, families and friends (for example, adding personal details to murals, concept maps, tally charts and pictorial tables)
  • illustrating on a pictorial map, or by making a model, the location of their home in relation to school or other features of the local area
  • creating representations to show the location of features of familiar places (for example, making a map and illustrating it with pictures; using objects to create bird’s eye view models)
Sequence familiar objects and events (ACHASSI004 - Scootle )
  • ordering images and objects (for example, photographs, drawings or artefacts) to show a sequence of significant personal events or milestones (such as age when beginning to walk and talk, at the birth of a sibling, when moving house, when new teeth appear, on the first day at school)
  • drawing story maps of events described in story books or in stories told by a storyteller

Analysing

  • comparing aspects of the childhood of parents, grandparents, elders or a familiar older person, with similar aspects of childhood today (for example, the favourite games of a familiar older person with those of self and class friends)
  • identifying places in the playground or local area that they like or places they like to avoid, and talking about the reasons for their feelings
Compare objects from the past with those from the present and consider how places have changed over time (ACHASSI006 - Scootle )
  • talking about differences between objects from the past and those of the present using comparative language (for example, 'This toy is older', ‘My new computer game is more fun than the old one', ‘This tree is older than …’)
  • distinguishing between older and newer, using such clues as the condition of the object, the width of a tree, the height of a person
  • identifying natural and constructed features of a place that have changed over time and those that have remained relatively unchanged
Interpret data and information displayed in pictures and texts and on maps (ACHASSI007 - Scootle )
  • talking about the relevance of information to a task (for example, how to find treasure on a treasure map, why a class timetable is helpful, how a weather map can help us decide what clothes to wear)
  • sorting pictures of places and people using criteria such as old/new, younger/older, same/different, outside/inside, safe/not safe, special/not special

Evaluating and reflecting

Draw simple conclusions based on discussions, observations and information displayed in pictures and texts and on maps (ACHASSI008 - Scootle )
  • suggesting ideas about the use of objects from the past and proposing reasons why the objects might have been important
  • identifying how a story connects with an aspect of their family history (for example, how a story book shows how and where their grandparents or a familiar older person once lived)
Reflect on learning to propose how to care for places and sites that are important or significant (ACHASSI009 - Scootle )
  • talking about what has been learnt about a place or site of significance to themselves or others and if they would like it to stay the same in the future
  • describing or drawing special places, telling what they have learnt that makes them special and suggesting how to behave when there

Communicating

Present narratives, information and findings in oral, graphic and written forms using simple terms to denote the passing of time and to describe direction and location (ACHASSI010 - Scootle )
  • describing events they have experienced and/or different places they have visited, using different modes of communication, (for example, orally, through objects, pictures and drawings, role-play and photographs)
  • reporting family history by presenting information in talk, drawings and play and by creating imaginative responses
  • using simple terms to denote the passage of time (for example, 'then', 'now', 'yesterday', 'today', 'tomorrow') when talking about their experiences
  • using appropriate terms to describe the direction and location of a place (for example, ‘near and far’, ‘above and below’, ‘beside and opposite’)

History

Concepts for developing understanding

The content in the history sub-strand in this year gives students opportunities to develop historical understanding through key concepts including continuity and change, perspectives, empathy and significance. Through studies of their family, familiar people and their own history, students look at evidence of the past, exposing them to an early understanding that the past is different from the present (continuity and change). They come to understand why some events are important in their own and others’ lives (significance), and how different people commemorate events that are important to them (empathy, perspectives).

Inquiry Questions

  • What is my history and how do I know?
  • What stories do other people tell about the past?
  • How can stories of the past be told and shared?
Who the people in their family are, where they were born and raised and how they are related to each other (ACHASSK011 - Scootle )
  • identifying and naming the different members of a family (for example, mother, father, step-parent, caregiver, sister, brother, grandparent, aunty, uncle, cousin) and creating concept maps of their family with pictures or photographs to show the relationship between family members
  • finding out where they were born and raised and placing their photographs, drawings and names on a classroom world map
How they, their family and friends commemorate past events that are important to them (ACHASSK012 - Scootle )
  • making a calendar of commemorative events that students, their family and friends celebrate (for example, birthdays, religious festivals such as Easter, Ramadan, Buddha’s Birthday, Feast of Passover; family reunions and community commemorations such as NAIDOC week and Anzac Day) and discussing why they are important
  • recognising ‘Acknowledgement of Country’ and ‘Welcome to Country’ at ceremonies and events to recognise that the Country/Place and traditional custodians of the land, sea, waterways and sky are acknowledged
How the stories of families and the past can be communicated, for example, through photographs, artefacts, books, oral histories, digital media and museums (ACHASSK013 - Scootle )
  • engaging with the oral traditions, painting and music of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and recognising that the past is communicated through stories passed down from generation to generation
  • sharing the story of an object from their family’s past (for example, a photograph, old toy, statue, medal, artwork, jewellery, stories), describing its importance to the family and creating a class museum
  • recognising that stories of the past may differ depending on who is telling them (for example, listening to stories about the same event related by two different people such as a mother and a grandmother)
  • using images, students’ stories and stories from other places to explore what families have in common (for example, people who provide for their needs and wants, love, safety, rituals, celebrations, rules, change such as new babies and dying)

Geography

Concepts for developing understanding

The content in the geography sub-strand provides ways of developing students’ understanding of place, space and environment. Students explore the place they live in and belong to, and learn to observe and describe its features, and why it is important to them. They explore their own special places, how they feel about them, what makes them special, and how they can care for them (place, environment). They learn that their place is also the place of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Peoples (place). The idea of location is introduced through learning about representations on which places can be located and drawing story maps and creating models to show where familiar places and features are located (space).

Inquiry Questions

  • What are places like?
  • What makes a place special?
  • How can we look after the places we live in?
The representation of the location of places and their features on simple maps and models (ACHASSK014 - Scootle )
  • creating story maps or models to represent the location of the places and features they pass on their way to school
  • identifying the ways Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples represent the location of Country/Place and their features (for example, by inscriptions on stone, stories, sand drawings, paintings, song, music and dance)
  • describing how the globe is a representation of the world and locating Australia and other places on a globe
The places people live in and belong to, their familiar features and why they are important to people (ACHASSK015 - Scootle )
  • identifying the places they live in and belong to (for example, a neighbourhood, suburb, town or rural locality)
  • describing the features of their own place and places they are familiar with or they are aware of (for example, places they have visited, places family members have come from, imaginary places in stories, or places featured on television)
  • identifying how places provide people with their basic needs (for example, water, food and shelter) and why they should be looked after for the future
The Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Country/Place on which the school is located and why Country/Place is important to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACHASSK016 - Scootle )
  • identifying and using the name of the local Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander language group
  • identifying how and why the words 'Country/Place' are used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples for the places to which they belong
  • inviting members of the traditional owner group to talk about Country/Place and places of cultural and historical significance to the Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander community in the local neighbourhood, suburb, town or rural area
  • identifying local Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander landmarks in the local area
The reasons why some places are special to people, and how they can be looked after (ACHASSK017 - Scootle )
  • identifying places they consider to be ‘special’ (for example, their room, a play area, holiday location or an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander place of family significance) and explaining why the place is special to them
  • describing the features of places that are special to them based on what they see, hear, smell and feel
  • discussing different ways they could contribute to caring for special places including those that are unique

Foundation Year Achievement Standards

By the end of Foundation Year, students identify important events in their own lives and recognise why some places are special to people. They describe the features of familiar places and recognise that places can be represented on maps and models. They identify how they, their families and friends know about their past and commemorate events that are important to them.

Students respond to questions about their own past and places they belong to. They sequence familiar events in order. They observe the familiar features of places and represent these features and their location on pictorial maps and models. They reflect on their learning to suggest ways they can care for a familiar place. Students relate stories about their past and share and compare observations about familiar places.

By the end of the Foundation year, students identify important events in their own lives. They identify how they, their families and friends know about their past and commemorate events that are important to them.

Students sequence familiar events in order. They respond to questions about their own past. Students relate a story about their past using a range of texts.

By the end of Foundation Year, students describe the features of familiar places and recognise why some places are special to people. They recognise that places can be represented on maps and a globe and why places are important to people.

Students observe the familiar features of places and represent these features and their location on pictorial maps and models. They share and compare observations in a range of texts and use everyday language to describe direction and location. Students reflect on their learning to suggest ways they can care for a familiar place.